via YouTube

“Don’t repeat our terrible mistake.”

These words are delivered in extremely dour fashion by former Denver mayor Wellington Webb in a new commercial opposing Proposition 205, an Arizona measure to legalize limited recreational marijuana sales in that state. The proposition is clearly modeled on Colorado’s Amendment 64, passed here in 2012; it even uses the slogan “Regulate marijuana like alcohol.” And Webb isn’t the only Colorado political noteworthy to speak out against it in the Arizona ad. Also talking about marijuana legalization using ultra-negative terms is onetime Colorado governor Bill Owens, whose image is juxtaposed with the shot above of marijuana edibles made to look like typical candy bars, presumably in an attempt to lure unsuspecting children into taking a bite.

marijuana-arrest.jpgadmin | Toke of the Town

Arrests for possession are ongoing even in legal states.

Here’s your daily round-up of pot-news, excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Download WeedWeek’s free 2016 election guide here.

A study from the ACLU and Human Rights Watch found that more people are arrested for pot possession in the U.S. than for all violent crimes combined. See the report here.
Arizona’s REC debate has led to questions about how drug smugglers would adapt. REC supporters say traffickers will lose business. Opponents say they’ll switch to selling heroin and crystal meth.
picmonkey_collageWilliam J. Sisti, Larry Johnson, Ken Lund and Don Graham

Cities and counties across Colorado have ballot measures related to marijuana regulation. Many of them involve adding additional sales taxes or excise taxes, which are paid when unprocessed marijuana is sold or transferred from a cultivation facility or site to a retail store, manufacturing facility or another facility. But there are also measures that would allow — or ban — the sale of marijuana altogether.

The towns of Palisade, Dinosaur and Englewood are considering allowing retail stores within town limits, while Pueblo voters will decide whether to ban all retail marijuana sales and production in Pueblo County. The only marijuana-related measure on Denver’s ballot concerns public marijuana use in designated areas. Here are the details, county by county: 

hightimescoverHigh Times

High Times magazine launched in the summer of 1974 and has documented the evolution of the marijuana industry though the decades. Now, in partnership with Emerald Brand Solutions, the magazine has created a clothing line to honor the industry and how far it’s come.

“The fashion trend in general is about retro and vintage…. You can see it at any show you go to. At the same time, what you’re seeing is this recognition of the legalization of cannabis,” says Larry Linietsky, COO of High Times. “It’s a way to support the movement by wearing the clothing. We think it’s well-timed. [It’s] vintage, counterculture and authentic.”

kansashighKansas Highway Patrol Facebook page

Update: In January, we reported about surveys being sent to prosecutors and law enforcement officials in Kansas by attorney general Derek Schmidt in an effort to determine how Colorado cannabis was negatively impacting the good people of that state; our previous coverage has been incorporated into this post.

Nine months later, Schmidt has delivered the fruit of this labor — “‘Legalization’ of Marijuana in Colorado: The Impact on Kansas,” a report on view below. And a summary of the results suggests that the quality of cannabis available in the state has improved significantly thanks to Kansas’s proximity to Colorado.

discount-tireLynn Trimble

Phoenix-based Discount Tire Company and its billionaire owner, Bruce Halle, face a growing boycott movement after making a $1 million donation to help defeat Proposition 205, the ballot initiative to legalize recreational use of marijuana in Arizona.

In August, local immigrant-rights groups organized a boycott after Discount Tire stores posted “Re-Elect Sheriff Joe Arpaio” signs in their windows. An infamous foe of the Latino community, Arpaio is almost certain to facecriminal charges of contempt for violating a federal judge’s orders in connection with the landmark discrimination case Melendres v. Arpaio. | Toke of the Town

The industry would rather see it younger.

Here’s your daily round-up of pot-news, excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Download WeedWeek’s free 2016 election guide here.

In Ottawa, a city public health board said the legal purchase age for REC should be 25, citing brain development. Bruce Linton, CEO of major grower Tweed, said the age should be 19, same as the drinking age in most of Canada.


Dear Stoner: I have bouts of nausea for days sometimes, and I’ve heard that pot tea can help. Do you know how to make it? I live in Colorado, so it’s legal here.

Dear Blizz: You’ve heard correctly — pot tea can be a marvel for those suffering from nausea. But since water isn’t a strong enough solvent to boil for extraction, making a cup is not as simple as putting ground-up pot in a teabag with boiling water. If you’re good using milk or butter in hot drinks, you can make a chai tea or latte by whipping up your own infused butter or milk: Mix ground herb into a simmering pan of milk or butter and let it heat on low for a few hours, then strain out the pot and add the liquid to your hot beverage of choice.

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