Dear Stoner: Why do you and all of the media refer to marijuana buds as “flower”? The flowers on the marijuana plant are produced by the male plant. The real magic happens when you successfully eliminate all of the males and their flowers and keep the females from getting pollinated.
Old-School Grower

Dear Old School: Some older growing guides refer to a male plant pollinating a female (resulting in a seed) as “flowering,” but that isn’t the case for the majority of cannabis literature nowadays. And while you’re defining a marijuana flower as when a seed is born, the true definition of a flower is “the seed-bearing part of a plant,” so that doesn’t mean an actual seed needs to spawn; it just has to be something that blooms, and that includes the buds we smoke. Also, most marijuana growing guides recognize the term “flower” in both female and male plants, with the female version turning into resin-coated calyxes and the male turning into a seed. That’s why so many grow guides refer to the last six to ten weeks of growing as the “flowering” stage. Some growers even refer to the stage as “blooming.”

hou_news_20160220_hillaryclinton_marcotorres_0017Marco Torres

She doesn’t seem very enthusiastic about full legalization though.

Here’s your daily round-up of pot-news, excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Download WeedWeek’s free 2016 election guide here.

A document preparing Hillary Clinton for her primary debates and released by WIkiLeaks suggests that as President she would continue President Obama’s hands-off policy towards state-legal marijuana industries, as long as they follow broad federal guidelines. Her talking points also suggest some openness to industry banking. (See page 97 of the document for more details.) via YouTube

“Don’t repeat our terrible mistake.”

These words are delivered in extremely dour fashion by former Denver mayor Wellington Webb in a new commercial opposing Proposition 205, an Arizona measure to legalize limited recreational marijuana sales in that state. The proposition is clearly modeled on Colorado’s Amendment 64, passed here in 2012; it even uses the slogan “Regulate marijuana like alcohol.” And Webb isn’t the only Colorado political noteworthy to speak out against it in the Arizona ad. Also talking about marijuana legalization using ultra-negative terms is onetime Colorado governor Bill Owens, whose image is juxtaposed with the shot above of marijuana edibles made to look like typical candy bars, presumably in an attempt to lure unsuspecting children into taking a bite.

marijuana-arrest.jpgadmin | Toke of the Town

Arrests for possession are ongoing even in legal states.

Here’s your daily round-up of pot-news, excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Download WeedWeek’s free 2016 election guide here.

A study from the ACLU and Human Rights Watch found that more people are arrested for pot possession in the U.S. than for all violent crimes combined. See the report here.
Arizona’s REC debate has led to questions about how drug smugglers would adapt. REC supporters say traffickers will lose business. Opponents say they’ll switch to selling heroin and crystal meth.
picmonkey_collageWilliam J. Sisti, Larry Johnson, Ken Lund and Don Graham

Cities and counties across Colorado have ballot measures related to marijuana regulation. Many of them involve adding additional sales taxes or excise taxes, which are paid when unprocessed marijuana is sold or transferred from a cultivation facility or site to a retail store, manufacturing facility or another facility. But there are also measures that would allow — or ban — the sale of marijuana altogether.

The towns of Palisade, Dinosaur and Englewood are considering allowing retail stores within town limits, while Pueblo voters will decide whether to ban all retail marijuana sales and production in Pueblo County. The only marijuana-related measure on Denver’s ballot concerns public marijuana use in designated areas. Here are the details, county by county: 

hightimescoverHigh Times

High Times magazine launched in the summer of 1974 and has documented the evolution of the marijuana industry though the decades. Now, in partnership with Emerald Brand Solutions, the magazine has created a clothing line to honor the industry and how far it’s come.

“The fashion trend in general is about retro and vintage…. You can see it at any show you go to. At the same time, what you’re seeing is this recognition of the legalization of cannabis,” says Larry Linietsky, COO of High Times. “It’s a way to support the movement by wearing the clothing. We think it’s well-timed. [It’s] vintage, counterculture and authentic.”

kansashighKansas Highway Patrol Facebook page

Update: In January, we reported about surveys being sent to prosecutors and law enforcement officials in Kansas by attorney general Derek Schmidt in an effort to determine how Colorado cannabis was negatively impacting the good people of that state; our previous coverage has been incorporated into this post.

Nine months later, Schmidt has delivered the fruit of this labor — “‘Legalization’ of Marijuana in Colorado: The Impact on Kansas,” a report on view below. And a summary of the results suggests that the quality of cannabis available in the state has improved significantly thanks to Kansas’s proximity to Colorado.

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