polk-leibsohn-fleeing-questionsRay Stern | Toke of the Town

Yavapai County Attorney Sheila Polk and talk-show host Seth Leibsohn don’t want Arizonans to be able to decide whether marijuana should remain a felony-level drug or become as legal as beer.

But following a brief hearing regarding the lawsuit they filed seeking to nullify a measure widely expected to appear on ballots this November, they didn’t care to elaborate for the edification of New Times readers.http://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news/sheila-polk-and-seth-leibsohn-flee-new-times-questions-about-their-anti-legalization-lawsuit-8469739

Kendal Norris and her company, Mason Jar Event Group, have done it again. Her most recent of signatureseasonal Cannabis Pairing Dinners last weekend allowed guests to combine a high-end cannabis experience with fairy tale scenery and amazing food.

Beginning the night with a shuttle service from Sweet Leaf Dispensary to Shupe Homestead Farm in Boulder County, guests socialized, ate hors-d’oeuvres, and drank cannabis-infused iced tea, all under the backdrop of the Rocky Mountain skyline.

Sitting down to a dinner prepared by award-winning chef Hosea Rosenberg of Blackbelly

We were so inspired by the beauty, creativity and mastery Norris and her team created for their Summer Seasonal Dinner, we’ve created a list of tips for you, should you wish to host your own backyard cannabis-infused soiree.

vagina-bong-apartment-roomScottsdale Police

Samuel Oliphant of Scottsdale was kicked out of his luxury apartment last week, days after a hazmat team found the place trashed, toxic, and just plain gross.

Scottsdale Police Department photographs of the interior of Oliphant’s former crib, obtained by New Times through a public-records request, reveal a garbage-filled drug den reminiscent of a hoarder’s home: a place where a paranoid user of marijuana and other drugs concocted (or attempted to, anyway) distillations or recipes or … something.

 

Is smoking pot a guaranteed religious freedom?

Excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

The activist known as New Jersey Weedman will be able to argue in court that raids on his Trenton, N.J. “cannabis temple” violate his religious freedom.

Kayvan Khalatbari, a prominent activist and businessman in Denver, discussed the industry’s lack of diversity with Vice.

Sports Illustrated travels to Humboldt to ask about the industry’s impact on high school and college sports there. “There are probably no other public schools in the world that have ever offered clipping trays — trays for clipping marijuana on — as part of their auction for the PTA fair,” local journalist Kym Kemp says.

NFL running back turned cannabis investor Ricky Williams is the subject of a new Sports Illustrated documentary. He estimates that 70 percent of NFL players smoke marijuana.

Harper’s Bazaar visits the annual Spirit Weavers Gathering, a getaway for New Age-inclined women, that the article calls “the world’s chicest cult.” There, author Marisa Meltzer hears of a California pot farm that has fertilized the plant with menstrual blood for two generations.

A Canadian known as Marijuana Man makes $78,000 a year getting high on Youtube. He told an interviewer that he’s had internet “since 1984.”

There’s a crowdfunding campaign to bring “industrial hemp building and farming ambassador” Klara Marosszeky to California for a visit. She’s based in Australia.

Wired visits high-end edibles maker Défoncé Chocolatier. (Défoncé means ‘wasted’.)

“The Summer Fair,” a festival in Portland this month, will have free pot giveaways.

Netflix will make “Disjointed,” a weed sitcom starring Kathy Bates.

The Reductress recommends “ Healthy Snacks To Balance Out All The Junk You’ll Devour When You’re High Tonight.”

ask_a_stonerWestword

Dear Stoner: My dad has expressed an interest in getting in on all this marijuana business; as a supportive daughter, I’m wondering if there is any opportunity for a veteran civil engineer in the industry.
Marisa

Dear Marisa: Your dad is probably overqualified for 99.5 percent of the jobs in the marijuana industry at the moment — but he could still find ways to use his skills, and there may be more opportunities in the future. Depending on what sort of civil engineer he was/is, he could help design the exteriors of grow houses. With all of the energy that hydroponic systems use in warehouses, I’m sure commercial growers and environmentalists alike would be interested in maximizing efficiency and minimizing energy use.

State-of-the-art grow warehouses will be more in demand as other states legalize pot. And if the federal government ever reclassifies it, big business will get involved — and will need people like your dad to make sure it’s not wasting money. If this whole legal-weed thing stays around long enough, businesses might even want to invest in artistic or sustainable cultivation operations, similar to what breweries and wineries do. How cool would it be to become the Frank Lloyd Wright of commercial pot cultivation?

marijuana-growing-plant

Governor Ducey imagines Arizona students lounging around, stoned out of their minds on marijuana-laced lollipops.

A Scottsdale mom worries about pot stores on every corner.

The Arizona Public Health Association sees benefits as well as risks.

Arizona voters will find these opinions and more among the pro and con arguments for Arizona’s marijuana-legalization initiative that the state published last week. It’s an entertaining, albeit lopsided, glimpse into various views on the issue.

Legalization troubles some cops.

Excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

LA Weekly asked cops why they oppose the Adult Use Marijuana Act (AUMA) California’s REC ballot initiative. “This is not a law-enforcement jihad or Reefer Madness,” Ken Corney, Ventura’s police chief and president of the California Police Chiefs Association said. “Proposition 64 isn’t about green, leafy marijuana that people smoke at home or pass across the aisle at a concert. It’s a for-profit play to bring the commercialization of marijuana to California.”

The piece continues: “[Corney] subscribes to the theory, so far unproven, that the proposition’s biggest financial backer, Holmby Hills tech billionaire Sean Parker, is in it to open the door to Big Marijuana profits for rich folks like himself.”

The group Law Enforcement Against Prohibition endorsed AUMA.

Three Santa Ana, Calif. cops who were caught on video last year snacking and mocking an amputee (“I was about to kick her in her fucking nub”) during a dispensary raid are no longer with the department. The Orange County District Attorney’s Office has filed petty theft charges against the three officers.

The three had argued that they believed police had already disabled all of the cameras and therefore “had a reasonable expectation that their conversations and actions were no longer being recorded.”

Art Way, Colorado state director for Drug Policy Alliance writes:

Those with vested interest in the devaluation of black life and the criminalization of black                            communities need the drug war for political cover. Those who want to end state sanctioned                        murders should consider joining forces to end the drug war. 

This is a war waged to keep the black, brown and poor disenfranchised all while using their bodies as commodities for a prison industrial complex similar to the human commodification witnessed during slavery. ( H/T Word on the Tree )

A small but growing number of Canadian RCMP officers (the equivalent of FBI agents) are getting their MED reimbursed by the government.

In the Philippines, imprisoned drug lords have raised a $21 million reward for whoever kills the country’s new president Rodrigo Duterte. For his part, Duterte offers bounties of $1 million for drug lords killed and $600,000 for drug lords captured. According to his administration, 75 percent of the drugs in the country were manufactured inside its largest prison.

Industry hub Pueblo, Colo. has seen quite a few drug busts.

A Pennsylvania man has been charged with abuse of a corpse after blending weed with brain embalming fluid.

The question of use by women who are expecting heats up.

Excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

A study suggests that cannabis use during pregnancy affects brain development. More Colorado newborns are testing positive for THC.

Thirty-three were hospitalized in Brooklyn, for suspected synthetic cannabis (“K2”) overdoses in the area around a subway stop.

The National Institutes of Health sent out a request for information about varieties of marijuana and their possible research value.

Check out this chart which illustrates last week’s remarkable finding that drug prescriptions are falling in MED states.

Project CBD published a CBD Users Manual. It’s one of the better ones I’ve seen.

Cannabis allergies are climbing.

The big move by Scotts Miracle-Grow into cannabis is dividing the industry.

Buzzfeed makes the case that Facebook and Google’s cannabis policy enforcement is a mess.

The U.K.’s GW Pharmaceuticals which has seen its stock soar on data from its cannabis-based drug Epidiolex, plans to raise $252 million on the Nasdaq exchange with Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and Bank of America Merrill Lynch shepherding the deal.

Business attorney Hilary Bricken lays out  six weed scams  for investors and others to watch out for.

Compliance at Millennium Bank, a community bank in Des Plaines, Ill. is reportedly under scrutiny from state and federal authorities for working with marijuana companies.

Whitney Hobbs, a founder of Oregon distributor Highly Distributed, has sued CEO Christopher Mallott for sexual harassment that led to her departure from the company. She says he groped and smelled her. The company declined to comment but an employee refuted Hobbs’ claims.

Cannabis sales continue to climb in Colorado and support the state’s economy. See here for more.

A glimpse of the future? A group of Colorado’s largest craft breweries, led a break-up of the Colorado Brewers Guild to form a new group called Craft Beer Colorado. The split follows an overhaul of state alcohol laws.

Analyst Alan Brochstein writes that Canada’s pot policies make more sense than America’s.

Former NORML head Allen St. Pierre joined a publicly-traded consultancy called Freedom Leaf.

DNC tokeLindsey Bartlett

Democrats have adopted a platform that their members are trumpeting as the “most progressive platform in party history” — and when it comes to marijuana, Dems aren’t just blowing smoke. The Party of the Donkey has taken a position on marijuana that no major political party in the United States has taken before.

The preliminary draft of the platform, released on July 1 by theDemocratic National Convention Committee, asserts that states should be “laboratories of democracy on the issue of marijuana.”

It goes on to say states that wish to decriminalize marijuana should be allowed to do so.

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