Laura Scudder

Often times, newer growers tend to believe that if you put up some lights and feed your plants good nutrients, you will get big yields. While these are factors in plant growth, the reality is that maximizing yields is about fostering photosynthesis and plant metabolism. That means maintaining temperatures, humidity, and adequate carbon dioxide levels. It is a delicate dance between balancing environmental factors, providing rich nutrients and listening to your plants that will ultimately lead to a bountiful harvest. Staying on top of CO2 levels while growing cannabis indoors, when combined with the right cultivation technique, can deliver you truly enviable yields.

Understanding the Basics of Photosynthesis

Anyone can throw together a rudimentary cannabis grow room, however, to get the most out of your garden, you have to understand the basic processes that lead to happy and healthy plants. Photosynthesis is the process by which all plants take in carbon dioxide, sunlight and water and convert them into energy. It is this energy that turns all of your hard work into the dense buds that you will come to harvest later. Increasing yields are all about maximizing the energy that your plant metabolizes from the nutrients you feed, and the environment that you create.

The Benefits of Increasing CO2

Optimal conditions for a cannabis grow are between 75 and 85 degrees, depending on strain, stage and a handful of other factors. Humidity levels should remain around 40-50% during flowering. There is an intimate relationship between temperature and humidity, however, the one thing that often gets left out of this equation is CO2. Carbon dioxide has a direct impact on the rate of metabolism in your cannabis plants. As temperatures rise, in order to keep up with the demand for increased metabolism, there has to be an injection of CO2. Increased CO2 facilitates the process of photosynthesis, and as a result can not only affect plant size, but the quality of cannabinoids contained within.

The Luxury of Indoor Cultivation

Indoors you have the luxury of being able to boost CO2 levels at will. This is one benefit to indoor cultivation. Increased CO2 levels, besides facilitating metabolic process, also aid the plant in fighting adverse environmental conditions. In a manner of speaking, CO2 helps to immunize the plant from things like air and soil contaminants, adverse reactions to physical damage, shifting temperature shock and a host of other potential problems. Carbon dioxide levels will often be the determining factor as to whether or not a plant pulls through in rough conditions.

Finding a Balance

Outdoors, the carbon dioxide levels are about 400 ppm, or parts per million. Plants themselves can handle a much higher concentration. To achieve optimal growth, indoor cannabis grow rooms should maintain a CO2 ppm of around 1200-1500. This means having sufficient light to bring temperatures up enough to balance the increased CO2. Finding the right balance between temperature, humidity and CO2 levels is the key to maximizing your plants’ metabolic processes and achieving the yields of which you once only dreamed.

Kristin Bjornsen | Toke of the Town

Remember when 72 percent of Floridians voted to usher in a new era of open access to medical marijuana? That triumphant moment for medical weed was just in November, but for Florida patients this morning, it feels like a lifetime ago.

Late this past Friday, a bill to regulate the new weed industry imploded in Tallahassee. Then medical marijuana’s two biggest champions — über-lawyer John Morgan and United for Care campaign consultant Ben Pollara — viciously turned on each other in a spicy Twitter beef.

Now the fate of medical marijuana access lies in the hands of Gov. Rick Scott’s Department of Health, which has already signaled it will enact even more restrictive rules. The whole situation is likely to end up in court, meaning hundreds of thousands of taxpayer dollars will be wasted — and patients, in the meantime, still won’t have the easy access to marijuana that voters overwhelmingly backed in November.
Dank Depot

Three days after state lawmakers failed to pass a bill establishing rules for medical marijuana, Miami Springs Vice Mayor Bob Best shook his head at a council meeting Monday night as the city attorney explained it was time to extend the city’s moratorium on dispensaries.

“The purpose of the moratorium was for us to have something ready when that hit, and, apparently, based on the legislative session, nothing’s gonna happen,” Best complained.

Pro-marijuana activist David Wisniewski pointed out repeatedly last year that Prop 205, the adult-use marijuana initiative, did not have the full support of the cannabis-consuming community.

Now he’s running a new legalization campaign that has the same problem.

The Safer Arizona 2018 recreational-marijuana initiative campaign has been getting positive press lately, including an article in Saturday’s Arizona Republic that claimed “Recreational Marijuana May be Headed Back to the Ballot.”

The reality, though, is that key legalization proponents believe Safer Arizona isn’t likely to collect enough signatures to make the ballot — and they have little or no intention of helping to make it happen. The Phoenix New Times has the story…

Thinkstock file photo

As our Ask a Stoner columnist noted this week, flying with marijuana is still not okay despite a TSA glitch that briefly suggested otherwise. But a new survey suggests that it’s happening a lot anyway. The report from MissTravel.com, which calls itself “the world’s first travel dating website,” shows that more than half the respondents have taken cannabis with them on a domestic flight. But that number tumbles for people traveling internationally.

Flying with marijuana has long been a hot topic among Westword readers. But the subject flared up nationally earlier this month, when the Marijuana Majority’s Tom Angell, a frequent interviewee in this space, tweeted the following: “Trump TSA marks marijuana as less restrictive on planes than alcohol over 140 proof, bottled water, corkscrews & recreational oxygen.”

Interiorrain

A new study on marijuana use and attitudes toward legalization was released earlier this week — just in time for 4/20. During the first week of March, the Marist Poll conducted the Weed & the American Family survey, funded by Yahoo News and focusing on the impact of marijuana use on relationships and the family.

The survey found that more than half of the adults in America have tried marijuana at least once in their lives. Nearly 55 million people in this country currently use marijuana; 35 million consume monthly, 20 million consume yearly, and 78 million have tried it but aren’t using it right now. That adds up to 22 percent of Americans using marijuana, and 63 percent of those using marijuana regularly. Of the respondents who are users, 54 percent are parents and 30 percent are parents with children younger than 18.

For most users, it’s a social activity; 88 percent of the respondents say they consume with their close friends. The survey also determined that there are almost as many marijuana users in the U.S. as there are cigarette smokers.

Herbert Fuego

Weed geeks love to test the same strain at different dispensaries. The Grow-Off is a type of Pepsi challenge whose results show which shops specialize in flavor, potency and yield — and which shops to avoid altogether. Last summer, when it was announced that over forty of Colorado’s commercial cannabis growers would be pitted against each other using the same mystery genetics, I couldn’t decide what I wanted to know more — who would win, or what the special strain was.

It took more than half a year, but the results are finally in: The secret mandatory ingredient was Race Fuel OG (also known as Race Fuel), a mix of High Octane OG and Face Off OG, two OG-heavy strains with names that leave little to the imagination. The Herbal Cure in Denver took home first for flavor and potency, while mountain-based High Country Healing saw the most yield.

As difficult as the scoring probably was, I would have paid a lot of money to be a judge on that panel. Luckily, some of the participating dispensaries are now selling their cuts of Race Fuel to the public. A quick whiff of the strain’s diesel and OG scents, which are like a combination of citrus cleaner and gasoline, will make tokers realize just how fortunate they are.

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Update: After the publication of this post, Scott Pack provided us with additional information that’s intended to show he did nothing to defraud the plaintiffs in a lawsuit against him and acted in a manner that was completely legal and ethical. See it below, following our previous coverage.

Original post: Attorney Matthew Buck has filed a lawsuit in what he calls “the largest fraud case in the history of Colorado’s marijuana industry.” This contention is rejected by Scott Pack, the entrepreneur at the center of it.

No criminal charges have been pressed against Pack at this writing. But in the complaint, on view below, Buck’s clients, Pierre and Christophe Raygot, claim to have been bilked out of $500,000 by Pack and Rudy Saenz, the latter of whom was among sixteen people indicted last month in what prosecutors describe as a massive operation that grew marijuana for distribution outside Colorado. And Buck maintains that seventeen additional investors were also taken by Pack and Saenz; he estimates the total losses at more than $5.3 million.

“We’ve never seen anything close to this” in the Colorado cannabis business, Buck says. “I’ve never seen investments this great fail, let alone fraud on this scale. And our law firm” — Corry & Associates — “has been doing this for seventeen years,” since the approval, in the year 2000, of Amendment 20, which legalized medical marijuana in the state.

Lindsey Bartlett

Our calendar is getting loaded for 4/20. Alongside more now-traditional events, such as the 420 Rally at Civic Center Park and Snoop Dogg’s annual Wellness Retreat show, there are some new ones on the roster, including a spring dinner put on by the Mason Jar Event Group, its first in the Mile High City.

Mason Jar is the “high society” organizer of the most coveted cannabis pairing dinners around. Think sun-soaked tables where Top Chef-worthy food is passed around along with joints, bongs and vaporizers; where the cannabis-industry elite, who appear the exact opposite of stoner stereotypes, thrive inside their own bubble.

Westword

4/20 has been a sacred holiday since the ’70s, and with Colorado leading the way on recreational legalization, Denver has become ground zero for the celebration. Whether it’s your first time in town for the big day or you’re a veteran, here are some tips on how to survive 4/20 at Civic Center Park and beyond:

1. Don’t carry more than an ounce
When you leave for the day, make sure you’re carrying no more than the legal amount of marijuana. If you’re planning to stop by a dispensary during the day, carry less than the legal amount so you don’t go over. In Colorado, it’s legal for adults 21 and up to possess one ounce of THC — flower, concentrates, edibles, whatever. Just make sure the total amount of THC does not go over one ounce.

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