Search Results: amsterdam (78)

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First, it seizes up the brain like an old Chevy being driven at full speed through the desert with no fluids; sending a violent message to the spinal cord that cripples the user in his tracks. Then comes the inability to breath properly, followed by 10-20 seconds of remaining consciousness before the brainstem resembles a rubber chicken bone, sending the person deep inside the hole to the otherside without any chance for survival. This my friends is the fierce course of the wrecking ball known as a heroin overdose, a brown drug so powerful it was once used to by the ancient Egyptians to paralyze camels in an effort to prevent them from biting during intercourse.

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Commons/LasVegasLover


High rollers. Glitzy casinos. Feathered showgirls. And now, weed.
Las Vegas has long been a city of overindulgence. That little slogan, “What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas,” exists for a reason. And that reason? Debauchery. Throw a little weed to the mix and it may just push that Vegas-bred stimulation into overdrive.
Not that legalization is a new subject in Nevada, mind you. When it comes to weed, the state has long been on board for medical use, with the state’s voters electing to legalize medical marijuana way back in 2000. And Nevada doesn’t only have medi-pot on the brain; a petition has been filed to legalize recreational pot as well that is expected to pass by 2016, which will create a blanket legalization of the plant for the state. The Houston Press has more.

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Wikimedia commons/Public domain image.

The mayor of Amsterdam is pushing for laws that would close cannabis-friendly coffee shops within 250 meters of schools, but only for part of the day. After about 6 p.m. as well as all weekend long and on holidays, the shops can open back up to tokers and space-cake eaters alike.
In the states, heads would roll over shops being within 250 feet of a school or even 1,000 feet of a school. Actually, that’s not true. The feds simply send out $.49 letters to everyone within 1,000 feet of schools and shut them down without really lifting a finger.

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BBC reporter Heather Alexander.

It’s always interesting to see the take on American medical and recreational cannabis from our friends across the pond. This recent report from the BBC on legalization in Colorado is proof of that, with the reporter singling out the ski resort town of Breckenridge as the potential American version of cannabis-friendly Amsterdam in the Netherlands. As a Coloradan, I highly doubt that will be the case — but the report does bring up a few interesting ideas.

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Nol van Schaik/Facebook

Good news from Amsterdam, where the mayor says the Dutch city will continue to allow foreign tourists in its famous cannabis-dispensing coffeeshops after January 1. That’s the day when the infamous WeedPass was to become mandatory in the Netherlands — with the effect of shutting everyone but Dutch locals out of the thriving coffeeshop scene.

Mayor Eberhard van der Laan made it clear in an interview with AT5, in answering the statement of Dutch Justice Minister Ivo Opstelten’s spokesman, who said Mayor van der Laan “could not” go ahead allowing foreign tourists to buy marijuana in Amsterdam’s coffeeshops nexst year.

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John Moore
A man smokes a joint at a 4-20 celebration in front of the state capitol building, April 20, 2010, Denver, Colorado

By Artemis Hendy
Special to Toke of the Town
From all over the world, people regularly make hazy pilgrimages to the Mecca of cannabis smoking, Amsterdam. It is not only home to liberal drug laws and a huge selection of cannabis cafes; it is also a stunningly beautiful city with picture perfect canals all over the place, historic churches lurching out of the scenery and quaint buildings on every corner. You can’t help but want to move there. 
But chances are you have been there and bought the t-shirt — and now, Amsterdam is threatening to ban foreign “weed tourists,” anyway.
So why not try an alternative cannabis-conscious destination? Such as…

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Big Buds
Police shut down the Cannabis Cup in Amsterdam today. It will be relocated and is still a “go.”

​The 24th annual High Times Cannabis Cup in Amsterdam, for the first time in its history, has been raided by Dutch police. According to reports, attendees were searched as they left the event.

The unprecedented raid comes as a wave of more conservative cannabis policies and attitudes engulfs the Netherlands.

In a video posted to YouTube, police can be heard announcing the event was being shut down and that attendees are subject to search, reports High Times. Vendors were asked to remain at their booths while attendees left.
High Times has announced that the event will continue Wednesday night with a scheduled concert at the Melkweg a concert hall in Amsterdam, followed by a full day of the expo — including Cannabis Cup voting — at the Borchland (Borchlandweg) on Thursday, the final day of the competition.

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Photo: The Washington Examiner
These buzzkill “No Toking” signs have been banned in Amsterdam.

​Only in the Netherlands! The city of Amsterdam said it will likely have to ban the “No Toking” signs it introduced in an attempt to discourage youths from using marijuana.

The Dutch government’s top legal adviser ruled that the city had no right to establish official zones where smoking cannabis isn’t allowed, since marijuana is already technically illegal in the Netherlands, reports The Associated Press.
In practice, possession of small amounts of weed is allowed, and both cannabis and its concentrated form, hashish, are sold openly in designated “coffee shops.”
When the “No Toking” signs first went up in 2007, they were stolen so often that the city started selling them as souvenirs.
City spokeswoman Iris Reshef admitted that Wednesday’s ruling likely means the buzzkill signs have to go, but the city can still fine young pot smokers who “cause problems.”
Medical-marijuana-sign-1.jpgadmin | Toke of the Town

The case was an anomaly in the legal state.

The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

Federal prosecutors agreed to drop charges against Devontre Thomas, a 19-year who faced prosecution for being caught with a very small amount of weed at a federally run boarding school for Native Americans in Oregon.

A Massachusetts court ruled that smoking MED violated a man’s probation.

Two men face criminal charges connected with the failed attempt to open a cannabis resort on a reservation in South Dakota.

Following a robbery at a Portland dispensary, police said Oregon pot shops are not attracting a disproportionate amount of crime .

The DEA’s criteria for whether a home contains a grow operation are very broad.

The New York Times reports on Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte’s unapologetically brutal war on drugs.

In Connecticut, schoolchildren will used seized grow lights to produce food.

The Kind investigates the judging of High Times Cannabis Cups, and speaks to Max Montrose, a connoisseur and critic of the high stakes process.

Vice learns about life as a “ trim bitch” on an illegal weed farm. The money is good, but conditions aren’t and sexual harassment is a problem.

Rapper Snoop Dogg is the executive producer of the new MTV weed comedy “Mary + Jane.”

Recently retired NFL player Eugene Monroe has a new column at The Cannabist.

Frankie Schnarrs, owner of Frankie’s Sports Pub in Olympia, Wash. said he’ll continue to allow patrons to use cannabis despite a recent fine and suspended liquor license, which he’s also ignoring. “I want them to take my license from me. They can go to Hell,” he told a reporter. “Get out of here. Get off my property.”

The Guardian hangs out with three elderly British women in Amsterdam, while they try pot for the first time. They enjoyed themselves at a playground, swinging on the swings.

Artist Tony Greenhand is well paid to roll joints that resemble guns, animals and other elaborate shapes.

Leafly looks back at jazz great Louis Armstrong’s long fondness for cannabis, which he called “the gage.”

Butane extraction has reached the U.K.

Cannabis tampons.

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