Search Results: drug raid (461)

A little known aspect of busts.
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An investigation in Reason finds “ widespread, unchecked violence against pets during drug raids.” Two Detroit officers it found have killed more than 100 dogs each.

The owner of Med-West, a San Diego extraction company that was raided by local authorities in January is seeking a return of his frozen assets. $324,000 cash was seized during the raid. No criminal charges have been filed.

Police departments are becoming more tolerant of applicants’ past pot smoking.

Las Vegas police said they would still pursue possession arrests, though the district attorney said they wouldn’t be prosecuted.

With Trump’s election, federal inmates incarcerated for non-violent drug offenses fear their window to win clemency is closing. “Some of these people are bad dudes,”  Trump said at an August rally “These are people out walking the streets. Sleep tight, folks.”

CBS tells the story of Harry Anslinger, a leading figure in passing the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937, which made it illegal.

The New Yorker sent Adrian Chen to the Philippines, where President Rodrigo Duterte is waging a brutal drug war. The article is subtly titled “ When a Populist Demagogue Takes Over.

In California, police are concerned about home grows.

Time Magazine calls hmbldt vape pens one of the 25 best inventions of 2016.
Ozy discovers “ happy pizza” in Cambodia. A Barcelona cannabis club was closed by authorities. There’s a cannabis/comic book convention today in Colorado Springs.

Vice learns how to make “ the most potent weed oil.”

The Washington Post recommends four books to understand the new weed reality. They include Marijuana: A Short History, by John Hudak, Jesse Ventura’s Marijuana Manifesto, Sacred Bliss: A Spiritual History of Cannabis by Mark S. Ferrara and Cooking with Cannabis by Laurie Goldrich.

The New Yorker published a pot-industry cartoon. It isn’t especially funny.

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Serve and protect? Really?


A Minnesota SWAT team on a brainwashed mission to rid the world of yet another non-violent drug user has tipped the scales of injustice and inhumanity by brutally killing a family’s pets while executing a no-knock search warrant on their St. Paul residence.
The twisted, domestic infantry marched up to the home belonging to Larry Lee Arman and his girlfriend Camille Perry early Wednesday morning and used brute force to bust down the front door while the family slept inside. “I was laying right here, and I really thought I was being murdered,” Larry Lee Arman told KMSP Fox 9. “I don’t want to say by who. I thought it was like, the government.”

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My Fox Memphis
They’re so eager to shoot the dogs these days, they’re accidentally shooting each other

Over the last few years, it seems cops have decided it’s the “thing to do” when conducting drug raids on family residences: Going in with guns blazing and shooting the family pets has become the barbaric way things are done in America’s War On Drugs. It’s almost as if once the avid Drug Warriors saw their fellow boys in blue getting away with this kind of thing, it became “their right” to shoot the dogs on the most petty little pot raids.

Now, they’ve gotten so avid about shooting family dogs while on drug raids, that in their unholy enthusiasm, these contemptible morons have starting shooting each other.

A Memphis police office was recently shot and critically injured by Officer Byron Willis, 43, who claimed he was aiming at a dog, city officials said on November 8. Willie Bryant, 32, of the Organized Crime Unit, was taken to the Regional Medical Center at Memphis.

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Photo: PicsDigger

​A pregnant, unarmed woman was shot during a drug raid in Spokane, Washington on Friday morning, and she remained hospitalized as investigators pieced together exactly what happened in the county’s third officer-involved shooting within a month.

A Washington State Patrol detective sergeant shot the woman, who is 39 weeks pregnant, while “serving a search warrant” at the Victoria Apartments on Lincoln Street, according to the Spokane County Sheriff’s Office, reports Meghann M. Cuniff of the Spokane Spokesman-Review.
The shooting is being investigated by the Sheriff’s office, along with members of the Spokane Police Department and the Washington State Patrol.
Officers found no weapons in the home, confirmed Sheriff’s Office spokesman Sgt. Dave Reagan. He claimed they did, however, find drugs — crack cocaine, marijuana, and controlled prescription medications — during execution of the search warrant.
But a woman who identified herself as the victim’s mother, but who wouldn’t give her name, said there were no drugs or weapons in the home.

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Photo: WXIA
Kathryn Johnston, 92, was shot five times by six officers after they busted down her door in a botched drug raid.

​The city of Atlanta will pay $4.9 million to the family of a 92-year-old woman killed in a botched November 2006 drug raid, Mayor Kasim Reed’s office announced on Monday.

Kathryn Johnston, 92, was shot to death by narcotics officers serving a so-called “no-knock” warrant. Investigators later determined the raid was based on falsified paperwork saying that illegal drugs were present in the home. Three former police officers were sentenced to prison terms for the cover-up that resulted, reports CNN.
The Atlanta Police Department’s drug unit underwent a major, though probably largely cosmetic, housecleaning as a result of the incident.
Johnston’s family will receive $2.9 million sometime in fiscal 2011, according to the mayor’s office, with the other $2 million to be paid in fiscal 2012, on or before August 15, 2011.

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Don’t Look At Me Like That. You Were Thinking It Too
Kitsap County, Washington is presumably safe from 9-year-old girls with Mickey Mouse wallets, thanks to those brave drug cops at WestNET

​A Washington State mother says that drug cops mistreated her son, took $80 from her daughter’s Mickey Mouse wallet, and trashed her house.

Christine Casey, affiliated with North End Club 420, a patient collective considered legal under Washington state law, told the Seattle Weekly that detectives from the West Sound Narcotics Enforcement Team (WestNET) handcuffed her 14-year-old son for two hours and put a gun to his head, reports Nina Shapiro.
They also told the frightened kid to say goodbye to his dad, Guy Casey, because they said the pot dispensary operator was going to prison.
As the Rambo-esque detectives trashed the home looking for cash, trying to prove the dispensary was illegally profiting from medical marijuana, Casey said they confiscated $80 that her nine-year-old daughter had received for a straight-A report card.
The gung-ho drug warriors found the money in the little girl’s Mickey Mouse wallet.

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Photo: MPP
Every year, CAMP goes all Rambo, terrorizing ordinary citizens for growing marijuana, of all things.

​Should a local radio station broadcast information on the real-time movements of police and drug agents? Community station KMUD, based in southern Humboldt County, the unofficial capital of marijuana cultivation in California, says its reports are an essential tool in protecting the community from police abuse.

The broadcasts grew from a citizens’ monitoring project that began after the Reagan Administration in 1983 launched the huge, wasteful and ineffective “marijuana eradication campaign” known as CAMP, or Campaign Against Marijuana Planting.
The waste, arrogance and abuse associated with the program — which has unfortunately become the largest law enforcement task force in the United States, with more than 100 agencies taking part — have become legendary.

That could end with legalization.

The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

California companies tell Inc. that a growing number of raids on businesses in California owe to asset forfeiture laws which allow authorities to seize cash and other valuables even if criminal charges aren’t filed.

An American citizen who was invasively searched at the Texas/Mexico border in 2012 will receive a $475,000 settlement but not an admission of guilt from the U.S. Border and Customs Protection agency. She previously received $1.1M from an El Paso, Texas, hospital that conducted secondary searches.

Devontre Thomas, the Oregon teen who faces a federal misdemeanor charge for possessing “about a gram” of marijuana, allegedly had it at his boarding school which is run by the federal Bureau of Indian Education. He faces up to a year in prison.

A judge in a trafficking case has ordered Yahoo to disclose how it handles deleted emails. The evidence includes emails that, according to Yahoo’s policy should not be accessible.

Filipino President Rodrigo Duterte defended war on drugs which includes offering money to those who kill drug dealers.

Masamitsu Yamamoto, a Japanese man with liver cancer died at 58 while on trial for MED possession.

A lot of cannabis is found on federal land. The mail is a popular way to send weed and other drugs.

An Alabama prison guard was charged with using a Bible to smuggle opioids into a prison.

TV personality Montel Williams was briefly detained in Germany for MED.

At 99.9 % THC, crystalline is the strongest hash in the world. It sells for $200 a gram in southern California dispensaries.

Humboldt County, Calif. will start stamping product originating in the famed growing region. John Malkovich will star as the head of a crime family in the Netflix series “ Humboldt,” inspired by Emily Brady’s book “ Humboldt: Life on America’s Marijuana Frontier.”

Hip hop star Lil’ Wayne stormed off stage 10 minutes into his set at a High Times event in southern California. High Times said it was “baffled” and “awaiting an explanation.”

Yahoo meets Jeremy Plumb, Portland’s “wizard of weed.” The Oregon State Fair will give out blue ribbons for top pot plants. A Portland director made the first professional cannabis drink commercial/video. It features a cute song.

Billionaire Richard Branson said he has smoked pot with his son and recommended that other parents do the same. Cannabis Now interviews impresario Dr. Dina, who’s not a real doctor.

Cannabis absinthe exists, but doesn’t contain THC.

The Cannabist says little gifts of weed are not a substitute for tipping.

In The Onion, Joe Biden said it breaks his heart that so many hard working Americans can only afford “shitty ditch weed.”

Here’s the WeedWeek list of pot journalists on Twitter. Send recommendations for upcoming lists (opponents, executives, activists etc.) to weedweeknews@gmail.com. Self-nominations welcome.

pueblo.heroin.meth.bust.2.800.croppedPueblo County Sheriff's Office

Earlier this year, High Times announced that it would move its annual Cannabis Cup to Pueblo after it was forced to relocate the event from Denver. And while the plan subsequently fell apart (and the Cup headed to California, at least temporarily), the idea of the Cup in Pueblo made sense since the community has been viewed as one of the more marijuana-friendly in Colorado.

But that reputation appears to be changing in a big way.

The number of busts aimed at allegedly illegal marijuana growshas skyrocketed in the city, with another one taking place this week. Since mid-March, the Pueblo County Sheriff’s Office has reportedly confiscated 5,900 marijuana plans and arrested 35 people in 25 homes.

Meanwhile, the PCSO has announced the breakup of a drug-trafficking operation with alleged links to a Mexican cartel — the conclusion of a months-long investigation that led to multiple seizures of methamphetamine, plus cocaine and heroin.

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