Search Results: growing (1094)

timcullenKate Simmons | Toke of the Town

Since it founded a medicinal grow in 2009, Colorado Harvest Company has had a commitment to clean cannabis, adding a recreational operation in 2014 and always improving on a well-oiled system. That system has earned Colorado Harvest Company a growing reputation for quality.

As more and more states have legalized marijuana, Colorado Harvest has been hosting many out-of-state visitors who want to observe grow operations. “The world is watching Colorado, and that’s why it’s so important that we do a good job here,” says Colorado Harvest CEO Tim Cullen. “We have people visiting at least every other week or so.”

img_9572Kate Simmons | Toke of the Town

This fall has seen a myriad of crime related to marijuana home grows. At last week’s Marijuana Management Symposium, a panel on law enforcement and public safety comprising Denver Police Commander James Henning,  former Erie police chief Marco Vasquez and Aurora Police Sergeant Scott Pendleton advised law enforcement reps from other states on what Colorado has done right in handling cannabis-related crimes — and what it should have done differently.

Henning addressed the issue of cannabis home grows, which he says have become a bigger problem in Colorado since Amendment 64 passed. “The black market and marijuana, it got big here,” he said. “It got much bigger. The black market in marijuana is booming.”

Pasted_Image_6_28_16__5_14_PMPhoto by Miami-Dade County Department of Regulatory and Economic Resources

Forty-three-year-old Alex Sanchez spent just one night in jail last October after he was arrested for growing weed at his house in Kendall. When he returned home, the electricity wasn’t on. Sanchez called to figure out what was up and stumbled upon a little-known county ordinance that prevented him from taking a hot shower or cooking himself dinner unless he forked over what amounted to his life savings.

That day, Sanchez learned he was on the hook for thousands of dollars in fees, inspection costs, permits, repairs, and, eventually, once all of that was paid off and completed, a four-figure deposit payable to Florida Power & Light.

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CBD oil.

Despite laws against growing cannabis, a group of about 100 parents in Chile have banded together to begin growing cannabis to help their children, many of whom suffer from severe epileptic conditions.
The group, Mama Cultiva, or “Mama Grows”, has formed to help parents learn more about how to grow cannabis, extract the beneficial cannabinoids and how to dose their children appropriately.

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Commons/IDuke


For some people, owning a home is one of their lifelong aspirations, only second to living out the rest of their days stoned to the bone in a legal marijuana state. Indeed, this level of paradise seems relatively easy to achieve these days, especially since an increasing number of states have voted to legalize the leaf for medical and recreational use.
Unfortunately, the problem some folks are running into, shortly after the last piece of furniture has been pulled off the U-Haul, is that some neighbors are not very pot-friendly and more than willing to file a complaint with the homeowners association the moment the first puff of pot smoke crosses the fence.

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Benton Mackenzie in court.


Benton Mackenzie doesn’t have much time left. The angiosarcoma eating away at his blood vessels and leaving fist-sized tumors on his skin is in the final stages. He’s in pain. It’s why he chose to grow cannabis at his parent’s Iowa home where he lives with his wife. It was worth the risk, a risk that ultimately led to his conviction for cannabis cultivation earlier this month along with his wife.
Without much strength or time left, though, Mackenzie wants to be comfortable. So he’s travelled from Iowa to Oregon where he can legally purchase cannabis with a doctor’s recommendation. It’s likely a last trip for Mackenzie, his wife and their son. And one he is already enjoying.

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Toke of the Town.


An Alabama political leader did what any good old boy from the anti-pot Bible belt would have done if caught with a marijuana grow operation on their property – he up and quit, y’all.
A report released earlier this week by The Gadsden Times verified that 52-year-old John Lloyd Ellis resigned from his position as the Cherokee County Republican party chairman after getting busted last Friday growing dope in his backyard. The big dog, State party chairman Bill Armistead says Ellis has since severed all ties with the Alabama GOP, and that the party wishes to refrain from issuing any further comments about the incident. “We will allow legal and judicial system to follow its course,” said Armistead.

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Not the parents grow, though that would be impressive.


A 9-year-old girl recently walked into a police station in the western Minnesota town of Barnesville and calmly reported her parents for growing marijuana inside their home.
“Her and one of her friends came here and just had these concerns about her parents,” Barnesville Police Chief Dean Ernst tells our sister paper, the Minneapolis City Pages, adding that the friend was about the girl’s age.

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