Search Results: harper (28)

 

Is smoking pot a guaranteed religious freedom?

Excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

The activist known as New Jersey Weedman will be able to argue in court that raids on his Trenton, N.J. “cannabis temple” violate his religious freedom.

Kayvan Khalatbari, a prominent activist and businessman in Denver, discussed the industry’s lack of diversity with Vice.

Sports Illustrated travels to Humboldt to ask about the industry’s impact on high school and college sports there. “There are probably no other public schools in the world that have ever offered clipping trays — trays for clipping marijuana on — as part of their auction for the PTA fair,” local journalist Kym Kemp says.

NFL running back turned cannabis investor Ricky Williams is the subject of a new Sports Illustrated documentary. He estimates that 70 percent of NFL players smoke marijuana.

Harper’s Bazaar visits the annual Spirit Weavers Gathering, a getaway for New Age-inclined women, that the article calls “the world’s chicest cult.” There, author Marisa Meltzer hears of a California pot farm that has fertilized the plant with menstrual blood for two generations.

A Canadian known as Marijuana Man makes $78,000 a year getting high on Youtube. He told an interviewer that he’s had internet “since 1984.”

There’s a crowdfunding campaign to bring “industrial hemp building and farming ambassador” Klara Marosszeky to California for a visit. She’s based in Australia.

Wired visits high-end edibles maker Défoncé Chocolatier. (Défoncé means ‘wasted’.)

“The Summer Fair,” a festival in Portland this month, will have free pot giveaways.

Netflix will make “Disjointed,” a weed sitcom starring Kathy Bates.

The Reductress recommends “ Healthy Snacks To Balance Out All The Junk You’ll Devour When You’re High Tonight.”

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Additional photos and more below.

Today marks six months since recreational marijuana sales began in Colorado, still the only state where such purchases can be made. (The first licensed retail shops in Washington are expected to open on July 7.) By the January 1 launch, eighteen stores had been licensed in Denver, and since then, the total has grown steadily. Some outlets have come and some have gone, but the latest total, as vetted by Westword‘s Amber Taufen, stands at a whopping 88 — fifteen more than our previous update in April.
All the licensed shops are included here, along with photos, videos, links and excerpts from reviews of the ones visited by Westword marijuana critic (your’s truly) William Breathes. See the countdown thanks to Michael Roberts below.

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Justin Trudeau.

The leader of Canada’s Liberal Party, Member of Parliament Justin Trudeau has been honest about his cannabis use in the past few months.
But now he’s drawing attention to the medical cannabis use of thousands of Canadians that is being threatened by law changes that prohibit home cultivation and force patients to purchase from state-regulated outlets. Trudeau has said the changes stem from the current prime minister’s “nanny state” approach to marijuana.

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While the U.S. government teeters precariously on the edge of complete shutdown, hinging on a hyperbole-ridden argument over whether or not its citizens deserve proper basic health care, their neighbors to the north in Canada are on the verge of another revolutionary leap in government-backed healthcare reform.Starting tomorrow, the Canadian government will begin to pump $1.3-billion dollars into its Health Canada program, earmarked specifically to prop up large-scale free market medical marijuana growing operations across the country, in a move that is expected to create not only jobs and revenues, but hundreds of thousands of new medical marijuana patients as well.

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Wikipedia commons.
Rusell Simmons.

What do P-Diddy, Cameron Diaz, Nicki Minaj, Ron Howard and Mark Wahlberg all have in common? Aside from being ridiculously famous and wealthy, they all support the reformation of drug laws in this country.
More than 175 actors, artists, athletes and elected officials signed on to an open letter to President Obama today, asking him to change our drug policy laws from punitive, harsh jail times to one that favors evidence- based prevention and rehabilitation.

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~ alapoet ~
Toke of the Town editor Steve Elliott celebrating three years of high points and big hits

Three years ago today — actually, three years ago tonight, at 7:08 p.m. Pacific time — my THC-stained fingers hit the “Post” button for the first-ever story on Toke of the Town.

“The good thing about a free marketplace of ideas is,” I wrote, in the first sentence ever to appear on this site, “despite the best efforts of prohibitionists and their fear-mongering propaganda, the truth eventually prevails.”
More than 3,600 stories later — and with hundreds of joints, medibles, and bongloads littering my path — I’m still loving this gig, and judging by pageviews, so are close to half a million of you every month.

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The Fresh Scent

Talk about irony, eh? The very same day American voters in two states legalize, the Stephen Harper government in Canada brought into force tough new mandatory minimum sentences for marijuana.
As Washington and Colorado both on Tuesday approved measures loosening their pot laws, drug measures in the Conservative government’s Safe Streets and Communities Act, passed last spring, came into full force in Canada, reports Bruce Cheadle of The Canadian Press.

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Laffin’ Place
The “Hollywood” sign was famously defaced in 1976 after the decriminalization of marijuana in California

On January 1, 1976, the iconic “HOLLYWOOD” sign was altered to read “Hollyweed” by the late Danny Finegood of Los Angeles and a few of his college friends. The stunt — celebrating the decriminalization of marijuana in California — got worldwide publicity at the time.

To accomplish the stunt, Finegood and his buds used ropes and sheets, and reportedly spent only around 50 bucks for materials. The prank was a class project while he was an art major at Cal State Northridge. (Yes, he got an “A” for the project.)
Finegood considered himself an environmental artist, not a vandal. In a letter to the L.A. Times in 1983, he said of the “Hollyweed” sign: “An artist’s role throughout history has been to create representations of the culture he exists in. By hanging four relatively small pieces of fabric on the landmark, we were able to change people’s perception of the Hollywood sign.”

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Green Wellness
Marc Emery: Two years to go

Marc Emery, the self-proclaimed “Prince of Pot” who is doing time in a United States federal prison, now has just two years left of his five-year sentence for selling marijuana seeds to American customers from his headquarters in Canada.

His wife, Jodie, who has spearheaded the Emery empire in the Prince’s absence, is marking the occasion with him in Mississippi, reports James Lewis at Vancouver’s CKNW radio.
“Eighty-five percent of the five-year sentence — that’s July 9, 2014 (when) he would be released,” Jodie said. “But we know that next year, Marc is eligible to apply for transfer to Canadian prisons, and he’ll be doing that in April.

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The Non Conformer

​Despite widespread criticism from experts and a massive price tag, Canada’s Harper Conservatives on Tuesday passed by a 154 to 129 vote the controversial Bill C-10, the so called omnibus crime bill or “Safe Streets and Communities Act.” The new law includes harsh mandatory jail sentences for minor marijuana offenses. The Beyond Prohibition Foundation, which has long advocated against these sweeping changes to Canada’s criminal justice system, said it was “deeply troubled by the implications of the bill.”

The bill increases sentences for drug and sex offenses, reduces the use of conditional sentences such as house arrest, provides harsher penalties on young offenders, and makes it more difficult to get a pardon, reports Bruce Cheadle of the Canadian Press.
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