Search Results: imperial beach (8)

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The Weed Blog

By Eugene Davidovich
 
Imperial Beach, California City Council member Brian Pat Bilbray on Friday issued an official endorsement in support of Proposition S, a voter initiative slated to appear on the November 6 ballot in the city. 
 
“With my sister having to use medical marijuana to treat her stage three melanoma this issue is very emotional and personal for me and my family,” Bilbray said. “If the federal government is not going to take it up upon themselves to start regulating, allow the FDA to actually look at it so it can be put in pharmacies, then it is up to the states to do exactly what they have done.”
 
If passed, Prop S would repeal the city’s current prohibition on medical marijuana dispensaries and replace it with strict zoning and operational requirements that would allow for a limited number of patient collectives and cooperatives to open in industrial and commercial zones of the city. Those that open would have to meet all operational and zoning requirements laid out in the measure including video cameras, centrally monitored alarm systems, overnight security, as well as strict non-profit operation.

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SafeAccessIB.org
Just more than 1,000 valid signatures are needed for November’s ballot, but organizers plan to turn in 2,000 to make sure

Advocates Begin Circulating Petitions To Overturn City’s Ban On Safe Access To Medicinal Cannabis

A team of community activists on Friday converged in Imperial Beach, California, and began circulating a petition and gathering signatures to place the Safe Access Ordinance of Imperial Beach on the November general election ballot.
If passed, the measure would overturn Imperial Beach’s current ban on safe access to medical marijuana and replace it with reasonable zoning regulations and operational requirements for medical cannabis dispensing collectives and cooperatives wishing to operate in the city.
The Imperial Beach City Council began working on this issue two years ago when Marcus Boyd, vice chair of San Diego Americans for Safe Access and local business owner in Imperial Beach, brought the issue to them at a council meeting.
At that time, the city denied Boyd’s request for a business license and adopted a temporary moratorium, promising to conduct research and return a reasonable ordinance in just a few months.

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Nuggetry

Fifteen percent of registered voters in Imperial Beach, California have signed the initiative to overturn the city’s current ban on safe access to medical cannabis and replace it with reasonable regulations.
 
The Safe Access Ordinance of Imperial Beach, a collaborative effort between Canvass for a Cause, a San Diego based LGBT non-profit, San Diego Americans for Safe Access, and concerned citizens, launched the first ever initiative to regulate safe access to medical cannabis in Imperial Beach. If passed, the measure would repeal the city’s current ban and replace it with strict zoning regulations and operational requirements for medical cannabis dispensing collectives and cooperatives.

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Facebook
The local news blurred out the “Fuck the Growers…Marijuana is still illegal” part of this narc’s lame shirt


There is no shortage of headlines in the news these days about police officers abusing their power and denying citizens of even their most basic rights.
From Ferguson, Missouri, to your town or one nearby, cops are getting caught – many times on camera – showing little or no respect for due process, and all too often are using their own personal ideologies as a sliding scale of sorts to decide when and how to enforce the law.
They typically do not wear that ideology printed on their uniforms, however, but one law enforcement officer involved in a raid earlier this week in San Diego has some explaining to do regarding his blunt sense of style.

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Safe Access IB

Law enforcement and prohibitionist groups are continuing to spend thousands of dollars in San Diego County, California, to craft and enforce unfair restrictions and bans on safe access to medical cannabis. These bans, combined with the recent federal crackdown on patients’ rights, have hurt those for whom California’s Compassionate Use Act of 1996 was designed in the first place, according to patient advocacy group Safe Access Imperial Beach.
San Diego County patients suffering from HIV/AIDS, multiple sclerosis, cancer, and other serious conditions are now faced with a difficult choice: either break the law and turn to local neighborhood drug dealers to find their doctor-recommended medicine, or travel a long distance — in some cases up to 50 miles — to the nearest permitted dispensary in the remote eastern part of the county.

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Neon Tommy

​Activists in the last week have filed initiative proposals to allow medical marijuana dispensaries in Encinitas, Solana Beach, Lemon Grove and La Mesa, all cities in north and east San Diego County, California. Another ballot initiative is in the process of being filed in Del Mar.
Citizens for Patient Rights, in association with the Patient Care Association, announced that they are expanding their direct democracy campaign for safe access to sympathetic communities around San Diego County. 

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The Liberator Today

​Californians have a chance to make two strides for human rights in the coming weeks. Two important bills before the Legislature must be voted on this month: SB 129 would grant employment rights to medical marijuana patients, and AB 1017 would reduce penalties for marijuana cultivation.

The Legislature will be voting on the bills in the next two weeks (between January 19 and 31). Both bills fell short of passage last legislative session, and both are in critical need of support fro constituents in key districts.

“We are urging supporters in key districts to contact their legislators ASAP!” said Deputy Director Ellen Komp of California NORML.

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Marijuana.com
The inevitable crackdown came, not as a result of harmless cannabis nor even of is frisky big brother, LSD — but due to the same, tired old death drugs that have been killing people and destroying lives for generations

Drug Screen of Surfers Could Wipe Out Sport’s Rebellious Image

The mystique of surfing, since its music-fueled rise on the American West Coast during the 1960s, has always had a lot to do with rebellion, with alternatives, with a countercultural image. With the “bushy bushy blonde hair” and the rest of the accoutrements, of course, came marijuana and LSD, drugs of choice for the surfing culture which, unlike traditional narcotics and stimulants, didn’t noticeably reduce the physical abilities of those participating in the sport.
The mystic search to catch the perfect wave became the obsession of many a stoner — but the perfection of the art of surfing was a double-edged sword. It brought with it the inevitable commercialization of the sport, and big-purse surf competitions, along with their attendant product endorsements, became the tail that started wagging the dog.