Search Results: in search of good medicine (132)

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All photos by Sharon Letts
Pure Life Wellness is located on La Cienega Boulevard in Los Angeles

By Sharon Letts
On the heels of continued raids by the DEA of four legally run dispensaries in Los Angeles, West L.A. dispensary owner Yamileth Bolanos is pretty much at the end of her Hemp rope, so to speak.
Bolanos, who is founder and owner of Pure Life Wellness, has been at the forefront of cannabis activism in the city of Los Angeles, where recently dispensaries were threatened with closure by city officials.
With the creation of GLACA, the “Greater Los Angeles Cannabis Alliance,” Bolanos, with other longtime dispensary owners, banded together to create their own entity in order to deal with the powers that be, driven by the philosophy that “strength in numbers” matter.
“We founded GLACA in 2006 to help create ordinances on how dispensaries should behave, because the city would not instate ordinances until 2010,” Bolanos said. “Those who were operating safely and were respectful of their neighbors needed a way to differentiate from profiteers who did not care about patient safety, or were otherwise problematic in their behavior.”

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Hercules Health Center is located in a state-o-the-art medical facility in Hercules, California, just north of Oakland

Story and Photos by Sharon Letts
Hercules Health Center, named after the bedroom community by the same name just north of Oakland, California, is located in a well-manicured, modern industrial park in a state-of-the-art, modern medical facility.
The large building is occupied by dozens of medical specialists who are no strangers to the dispensary or the magic of cannabis.
“We have many specialists in the building who send patients here for alternative therapies,” said Ed Breslin, co-founder of the center. 

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All photos by Sharon Letts

She’s The Brains, He’s The Strains: On The Road With Craig & Sharon


Story and Photos by Sharon Letts
Strain Review by Craig Carroll

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Introduction: Changing the Way People Think About Cannabis, One Bud at a Time

By Sharon Letts

Craig and I came of age in the 70s. He surfed and played guitar in rock bands, while I rode the waves on a Boogie Board and gardened.
Both of us reaped the benefits of cannabis: Craig for anxiety and undiagnosed autism; me for menstrual cramps and depression. I can’t speak for the boys, but we girls knew what worked each month, and pitied the girl relying solely on Midol and a heating pad.
Both of us watched as cannabis grew up to be good medicine, then was legalized in California in 1996. Neither of us rushed out to get a “Prop. 215 card.” I was busy raising my daughter; he was teaching high school and starting a family. Both of us stopped smoking for long periods of time. 
Surprisingly, it was age and health issues that brought the herb back into our lives. 
Heading into menopause, already suffering from digestive issues and weight gain caused by Thyroid Disease, I began using cannabis to relax my stomach where I hold my stress. 
Sleeplessness with menopause has become a huge issue for me, and a honey tincture provides at least six good hours of sleep a night, allowing me to write. 
While others may go the pharmaceutical route, we’ll stick to this simple herb. Our travels will have Craig looking for a pick-me-up for his chronic fatigue and relief for his chronic pain. I’ll be perusing the edible isles for sleep-aids and help with my flucuating mood swings.
Each trip will include a review of the top five collectives from the town we are visiting, while Craig reviews its top strains, deciphering aesthetics of the bud, and potential medicinal benefits.
We’ll also find a canna mover and shaker from that town and have a hang-out, chatting about what’s going on with the medicine in their world.
If your personal favorite club isn’t listed, not to worry, we’ll pass through town again! Send in your favorites and who knows, maybe your friendly neighborhood collective will make our list during our next trip.
So, sit back, relax, roll-up a fatty, and enjoy the ride!

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Phoenix New Times 2014.


Dr. Sue Sisley was about to conduct some of the most important cannabis research in the United States when she was abruptly fired from her job at the University of Arizona this past June for what she says (and what clearly appears to be) purely political reasons.
Our cohorts at the Phoenix New Times have done an amazing job looking into what happened and, more importantly, what is in store for Sisley’s study that looks at how military veterans can use cannabis to help treat symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder.

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As we’ve reported, the University of Arizona fired the lead researcher of a study that looked at the therapeutic benefits of cannabis for treating people with post-traumatic stress disorder. While no reasons were given, Dr. Sue Sisley says that she was fired for political reasons and not because of her performance.
And now she has filed an official appeal with the university, demanding that continue as assistant professor and assistant director of the Arizona Telemedicine Program. She has support, too. As we wrote earlier this week, an Iraq veteran posted an online petition at Change.org that has gathered more than 31,300 online signatures.

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Sue Sisley.

The lead researcher for a study looking at medical marijuana for post-traumatic stress disorder at the University of Arizona has been fired, and she is now claiming it is because of her cannabis lobbying.
Sue Sisley, formerly the assistant director of the Arizona Telemedicine Program at UA, was informed this week that her contract will not be renewed next year but was not given any reason in a letter from the interim dean of the College of Medicine.
But Sisley says the reasons are pretty clear. She says it is because of her advocacy at the state capitol for medical cannabis research – particularly in PTSD treatments for returning military veterans.
That included speaking at the state capitol to provide some sense to the argument when people like State Sen. Kimbery Yee blocked research funding based on her own political agenda. Keep in mind, the $6 million she blocked from being used was all excess from medical marijuana patient and dispensary fees. But Yee didn’t want it to go back to the benefit of medical marijuana patients.

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Minnesota state Rep. Diane Loeffler.


About the only thing people can agree on when it comes to the medical marijuana debate is that the federal government isn’t helping. Many of the disputes at the state level wouldn’t be necessary if the Drug Enforcement Administration would reconsider its classification of the plant as a Schedule One narcotic and expedite, rather than hold up, serious research on its medicinal value.
Troubled by this, Minnesota state Rep. Diane Loeffler (DFL-Minneapolis) introduced a resolution Thursday that calls upon President Obama and Congress to force those federal agencies into action.

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Weedist

By Jack Rikess
Toke of the Town
Northern California Correspondent
I had the privilege and honor of attending a conference this past week in San Francisco titled, “Cannabis In Medicine.” The symposium brought together all levels of health care workers: Doctors, nurses, researchers and other medical professionals, mostly unfamiliar with marijuana as a medical treatment, gathered in one room to receive straight, sober information. We were treated to the results of data, case studies and clinical trials conducted using cannabis therapy.

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Sharon Letts
Dr. Marion Fry believes that cannabis is good medicine, and that God will save her.

Exclusive Prison Interview:
Dr. Mollie Fry
Story and Photos
by Sharon Letts
It’s been one year and five months since Dr. Marion “Mollie” Fry and her husband, Civil Attorney, Dale Schafer, surrendered to Federal prison for manufacturing and distributing Medical Cannabis in California.
More than six years of litigation and three years of appeals rendered “no defense,” insuring mandatory five year Federal prison terms, respectively.
In 2001 the Fry/Schafer family home located in the hills just north of Sacramento was raided by Federal authority under then President George W. Bush, Jr. during the failed “War on Drugs.” 
Thirty-four plants were confiscated – 20 were infested with spider mites, sitting near a compost pile. 
44 Plants in a Pile
According to Schafer, the couple had never grown more than 44 plants in a given year – well below the 99 plant limit set forth by the State of California for medical use – and never sold a leaf.

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All photos by Sharon Letts
The Bud Sister’s Pain Relief Salve, infused with lemongrass

Lotions, Salves & Oils… Oh, my!
By Sharon Letts
“Why would you put something in your mouth, you can’t swallow?” my friend asked, showing me the label of a trusted tube of toothpaste. 
It was 1975. I was 16, she was 17, and the “Clean Air & Water Acts” were in effect, opening up a whole new topic of conversation at home…. How would we make our own difference? Shortly after that conversation I bought my first tube of “Tom’s of Maine” (Fennel) toothpaste, and have not looked back.
Around that same time my mom gave me my first bottle of fancy face lotion – “Oil of Olay.” The glass bottle of thin, pink cream with its black cap seemed elegant and French to my young, impressionable mind. It smelled good, was soft on my face, and I had seen it in magazines. It must have been alright, right?
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