Search Results: injustice (52)

wp48ae25ac_05_06.jpeg
PeterMcWilliams.org
R.I.P. Peter McWilliams (1950-2000)

By Robert Platshorn
The Silver Tour
Long before he was incarcerated, Peter McWilliams wrote about the injustice of our cannabis laws. Peter’s death is significant only as statistic in our insane drug war. There have been thousands of Peters who lost their lives as a result of a cruel and impersonal system that incarcerates hundreds of thousands of our citizens — ordinary, hardworking Americans who have committed no crime against person, property or society.
If you believe that Peter was singled out for his activism, you have nothing left to fight for. He’s gone! The truth is he was treated like every other prisoner in the federal justice system. There are hundreds, maybe thousands of marijuana offenders, both in and out of prison, who are in exactly the same situation as Peter at the time of his death.
In my 30 years in federal prison for marijuana, I saw dozens of pointless unnecessary deaths, and hundreds who lost limbs or contracted debilitating diseases simply for lack of treatment.

Sisley-PNT.jpg

Controversial cannabis researcher Sue Sisley is on her way back to Colorado today, after six months that have been a “pretty barbaric rollercoaster,” she says. “One injustice after another, and I suspect it will not slow down for quite a while.” But at the end of November, the Arizona-based researcher finally caught a break: Colorado’s Medical Marijuana Scientific Advisory Council chose eight research-grant proposals for the Board of Health to consider at its December 17 meeting — including Sisley’s proposal to study the effectiveness of using marijuana to treat veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.

Washington-DC.jpg


Think marijuana use, cultivation and possession of limited amounts of pot should be legal for adults 21 and up? Think you should be able to purchase some pot at a local, neighborhood store possibly right in the shadow of the nation’s capitol? You’re not alone.
The D.C. marijuana initiative has received the support of the local chapters of the NAACP and the National Organization for Women.


Earlier this week, a reader passed along the following note and video to us. It’s a frustrating tale that unfortunately is all too common, even in states that allow for medical cannabis use and cultivation.
“Deborah and Dennis are elderly patients living in San Diego that decided to grow a small amount of cannabis for personal use and soon after were raided by the San Diego Narcotics Task Force. Deborah Little has been HIV positive for over 20 years and her husband suffers from nerve damage – there is no reason they should have been raided and dragged through the judicial system. Thankfully, they were both found NOT GUILTY in the end, but not before the public officials made their life a living hell for nearly 2 years. It is a true injustice that patients are still having to deal with this in 2014.”

hydrogrow1.jpg
FlickrCommons


Back in 2008, a massive DEA sweep through suburban Philadelphia took down a multimillion dollar cannabis cultivation ring, resulting in the arrest and indictment of twelve Vietnamese Americans who stood accused of conspiring to grow thousands of highly illegal pot plants across several grow sites in Berks County, Pennsylvania.
Among those rounded up in the raids was then 40-year old Dung Bui, also known as “Danny Bui”. Facing compounded consequences due to the fact that his grow site was within spitting distance of a school-owned park, Bui pled guilty to charges of conspiracy to manufacture more than 1,000 marijuana plants and manufacturing and distributing marijuana within 1,000 feet of an athletic field owned by the school district.
Now, six years later, the 3rd Circuit Court has tossed the 2008 ruling out the window, vacating Bui’s guilty plea based on his appeal that he was given bad advice by his attorney.

sunburn.JPG
Sunburn O.G.


With less than a month to go before November elections that could bring the legalization of limited amounts of cannabis for adults 21 and up, the New York Times has stepped in to the mix with an editorial endorsing the pot policies.
“Opponents of legalization warn that states are embarking on a risky experiment. But the sky over Colorado has not fallen, and prohibition has proved to be a complete failure. It’s time to bring the marijuana market out into the open and end the injustice of arrests and convictions that have devastated communities.”

TheLittles2.jpg
Bobby Earle
Deborah & Dennis Little had their home raided in 2012, now they’re fighting back


Two years ago, in September of 2012, a law enforcement helicopter buzzed over the top of Dennis Little’s land in the quiet country town of Ramona, California. One month later, a joint task force comprised of local law enforcement officers and DEA agents kicked down Mr. Little’s door and arrested him and his wife on suspicion of cultivating illegal amounts of marijuana.
In March of 2013, San Diego District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis took them to court on the charges, and one full year later, in March of this year, they beat her at her own game and were fully acquitted of all charges by a jury of their peers.
With two years of their lives turned upside down, thousands of dollars lost to lawyers and courts, and a hard reputation to shake in a small town, one might think that the Little’s would be happy to put it all behind them. But they have some justice of their own to attend to first.

homeless-womEOSflickr.jpg
Flickr/WomEOS
The government would rather see pot smokers homeless.


Despite Colorado having passed legislation to legalize limited amounts of marijuana for recreational use for adults 21 and up, some residents remain victimized by lingering, antiquated pot laws. Indeed, the purgatory between a progressive state law and federal prohibition have continued to wreak havoc on residents like 87-year-old Lea Olivier, who was recently evicted from federal housing after an inspector claimed to smell weed. Now, she has less than two weeks to find a new place to live.

gavel-weed.jpg


Delaware is known for having some of the most obscene and outdated pot laws in the United States, with possession of even small amounts of the ganja punishable by up to six months in jail and a fine up to $1,150. Not only is this powdered wig injustice smearing the permanent records of many citizens who would not otherwise have a criminal history, but in most cases, these people cannot even afford the proper legal council to give them a fighting chance in court.
Fortunately, attorney Thomas Donovan maintains the belief that petty pot offenders should not have to shell out big bucks for a solid legal defense, which is why he now offers free legal services to stoners.

swat-team1.jpeg
Serve and protect? Really?


A Minnesota SWAT team on a brainwashed mission to rid the world of yet another non-violent drug user has tipped the scales of injustice and inhumanity by brutally killing a family’s pets while executing a no-knock search warrant on their St. Paul residence.
The twisted, domestic infantry marched up to the home belonging to Larry Lee Arman and his girlfriend Camille Perry early Wednesday morning and used brute force to bust down the front door while the family slept inside. “I was laying right here, and I really thought I was being murdered,” Larry Lee Arman told KMSP Fox 9. “I don’t want to say by who. I thought it was like, the government.”

1 2 3 6