Search Results: legislation (609)

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The North Carolina House last night approved a CBD-only bill in what seems to be a fast track to overall passage.
It’s a step in the right direction, sure, but it’s still very limited and relatively hard to get access in the program. If approved by the Senate and given the okay by the governor, North Carolina citizens suffering from chronic seizure disorders would be able to access the treatment only after proving that at least three other drugs don’t work. The bill is mostly aimed at children in the state.

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New Jersey state Sen. Nicholas Scutari.

New Jersey is wasting millions of dollars on the enforcement marijuana laws and blowing millions in tax revenue that could be generated if the plant was taxed and regulated. Because of that, New Jersey state Sen. Nicholas Scutari says that New Jersey should follow the lead of Colorado and legalize the use, sales and cultivation of limited amounts of cannabis for adults 21 and up.
Of course, as long as Chris “Tollbooth” Christie is in office, actually getting the measure passed and signed into law is a very long shot.

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Flikr.com
Let me grow.

The movement to reform our failed cannabis policies has grown tremendously in recent years and months. It’s not slowing down anytime soon. Cannabis reform is a mainstream issue, and frankly, there’s no denying it. A majority in the county support legalizing cannabis, and 81% support its legalization for medical purposes.
On top of this, a majority of states in our country (27 in total) have either decriminalized cannabis possession (14), or legalized it for medical and/or recreational purposes (18). The remaining states are hard at work towards reform, and advocates in the states mentioned above are vehemently trying to improve their situation. For those who have been on the line about getting involved in helping bring cannabis law change, now is absolutely the time to jump in.
Below is a breakdown of efforts going on around the country:

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Surf In Oregon

​​With some of the wack-ass laws emanating from the Oklahoma Legislature recently — I mean, come on, life in prison for hash? — you might wonder if those Okie lawmakers are on drugs, or something.

Well, you’re just gonna have to keep wondering, because the Republican-led Oklahoma Senate has killed legislation that would have required politicians to be drug tested, along with people receiving temporary public assistance, reports Michael Allen at Opposing Views.
The Senate Committee on Health and Human Services on Monday passed a bill that would require applicants for the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) program to undergo a mandatory drug test, reports KSWO-TV, but they stripped out language that would have required they themselves be tested.

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Graphic: Drug Policy Alliance

​The first bill ever introduced in Congress to end federal marijuana prohibition is coming on Thursday, June 23. Historic, bipartisan legislation which would end the United States’ war on marijuana — and allow states to legalize, tax regulate and control cannabis commerce without federal interference — will be introduced by Rep. Barney Frank (D-Mass.) and Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas).

Co-sponsors of the bill include Rep. John Conyers (D-Mich.), Rep. Steve Cohen (D-Tenn.), Rep. Jared Polis (D-Colo.), and Rep. Barbara Lee (D-Calif.)

The legislation would limit the federal government’s role in marijuana enforcement to cross-border or interstate smuggling, allowing people to legally grow, use or sell marijuana in states where it is legal.

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Photo: Jeff Fryer/flickr
Rep. Jared Polis (C-Colorado) will meet on Wednesday with members of the National Cannabis Trade Association to discuss the federal legislative needs of marijuana-related businesses.

​The National Cannabis Industry Association, the first national trade organization dedicated to advancing the interests of marijuana-related businesses, will discuss the federal legislative needs of the industry at the National Press Club this Wednesday, March 30.

Prominent leaders in the industry will join Congressman Jared Polis (D-Colorado), as well as the manager of See Change Strategy, an independent firm that, on March 23, released the first-ever financial analysis of the legal medical cannabis industry in the United States.
This report, based on interviews with more than 300 people in the industry, projected the total legal medical cannabis market at $1.7 billion in 2011.

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Photo: Marijuana Reviews

​Good news, folks. Preachers, police and politicians in Illinois must have already solved all the real and important problems troubling the state, because now they seem to have time to go after blunt wraps.
Clergy and cops are backing a plan being pushed in the General Assembly to classify blunt wraps — made of tobacco leaves, and often used to roll marijuana — as “drug paraphernalia,” reports Kristen Mack at WGN-TV.

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Photo: www.liberty-lawyer.com
Indoor marijuana grow in Minnesota. Thanks to Governor Tim Pawlenty’s veto, patients still have to break the law to use medical cannabis.

​With Minnesota’s legislative session set to begin this week, the author of last year’s medical marijuana bill said he doubts he will introduce another bill this year.

“For right now, it looks a little discouraging,” said State Senator Steve Murphy, who authored and introduced medical marijuana bills in both 2007 and 2009, reports Kyle Potter at mndaily.com.
A medical marijuana bill actually passed the Minnesota Legislature last session, but was then vetoed by Republican Gov. Tim Pawlenty.
Lindsey Bartlett

On July 20, the Senate Appropriations Committee approved the Energy and Water Development appropriations bill for fiscal year 2018, authorizing $38.4 billion in spending. Wedged into this bill was the Industrial Hemp Water Rights Act, a piece of bipartisan legislation introduced in part by Colorado senators Michael Bennet and Cory Gardner.

File photo by Shane Lopes/L.A. Weekly

New legislation would force the federal government to allow veterans to obtain medical marijuana in states, like California, where it’s legal.

The amendment to force the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs to make cannabis available to veterans who need it was recently approved by the Senate’s Appropriations Committee 24 to 7. The department would be prohibited from interfering with a veteran’s ability to obtain weed, and from blocking healthcare providers from giving pot to veterans where it’s legal, according to language attached to a military appropriations bill.

“The amendment ensures that veterans have equal access to all of the medical options available in their local community, to include medical marijuana in states where it is legal,” according to a statement from the office of co-author Steve Daines, a Montana Republican.

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