Search Results: memphis (14)

The industry is worried.

Here’s your daily round-up of pot-news, excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek

President-elect Donald Trump nominated anti-pot hardliner Sen. Jeff Sessions of Alabama (R) for Attorney General. At a Senate hearing in April 2016, Sessions said that ‘we need grown-ups in charge in Washington to say marijuana is not the kind of thing that ought to be legalized, it ought not to be minimized, that it’s in fact a very real danger.’

“I think one of [Obama’s] great failures, it’s obvious to me, is his lax treatment in comments on marijuana,” Sessions said at the hearing. “It reverses 20 years almost of hostility to drugs that began really when Nancy Reagan started ‘Just Say No.’ ”

Lawmakers, he said, have to “send that message with clarity that good people don’t smoke marijuana.”
USNews calls Sessions an “ Existential threat” to state-legal cannabis. Industry leaders are very nervous.

Reason points out that Sessions has an “aversion to civil rights” and gay rights. The U.S. Senate failed to confirm him for a federal judgeship in 1986, amid allegations of what late Senator Ted Kennedy called “racial insensitivity” and “lack of commitment to equal justice under the law.” The New York Times editorializes that the nomination is an “ insult to justice.”

What does a Trump presidency mean for the industry? The transition team isn’t talking. NBC speculates.So does CBS.

The Sessions nomination needs to be approved by the Senate. Have a view you want to share?  Contact your Senator.

Before the Sessions pick, the Washington Post’s Radley Balko said former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani (R) would also be “ terrifying.”

Before the Sessions pick, anti-legalization activist Kevin Sabet said, “A Trump administration throws everything up in the air… “Is it going to be ‘ states’ rights Trump’ or ‘law-and-order Trump’?”

Marijuana.com’s Tom Angell has launched a petition for Trump to keep his “marijuana pledge” to respect state laws.  Even if he doesn’t go after the industry, The Stranger says President Trump will  make the industry whiter.

It’s official, Denver will be the first U.S. city to license social use businesses.

After the Massachusetts REC vote, Rhode Island could legalize REC through the legislature. Alaska is setting up a  drop box system  to collect taxes in cash.

Tennessee Attorney General Herbert Slatery (R), said looser cannabis regulations in Memphis and Nashville can’t stand.

Due to a glitch, it appears that MED in California will be tax-free until the state’s REC program begins in 2018.

Some conservatives don’t like that MED patients can’t buy guns.

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It could mean a clean sweep.

Here’s your daily round-up of pot-news, excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Download WeedWeek’s free 2016 election guide here.

Legalization is ahead in all nine states where it’s on the ballot.
The Florida Democratic Party  donated $150,000  to support MED in Florida. Casino billionaire Sheldon Adelson  gave another $500,000  to oppose MED in Florida.
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it’s another security concern dispensaries face.

The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

Ryan Kunkel, owner of Seattle dispensary Have A Heart alleges that a recent robbery was an inside job.

Mexican police executed more than 42 suspected gang members on a ranch last year.

The Justice Department said it would stop using private prisons on grounds that they’re more dangerous and less well run than public prisons. The move does not apply to most prisoners in the country, who are incarcerated under state laws.

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DJ Paul and cohorts

DJ Paul isn’t just a codeine syrup sippin’ Memphis thug. He’s an Academy Award winner alongside his Three 6 Mafia brethren for their original song “It’s Hard Out Here For A Pimp,” for the movie Hustle & Flow.

He’s got an album dropping September 2nd, The Killjoy Club, with the Insane Clown Posse, and another soon after with Da Mafia 6ix, who he is currently on tour with.

He’s also an avid pot head and bbq sauce impresario who loves marijuana edibles and having a good time. Here’s what he had to say about smoking Headbanger, starting a dispensary, and what he thinks of dabs.

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My Fox Memphis
They’re so eager to shoot the dogs these days, they’re accidentally shooting each other

Over the last few years, it seems cops have decided it’s the “thing to do” when conducting drug raids on family residences: Going in with guns blazing and shooting the family pets has become the barbaric way things are done in America’s War On Drugs. It’s almost as if once the avid Drug Warriors saw their fellow boys in blue getting away with this kind of thing, it became “their right” to shoot the dogs on the most petty little pot raids.

Now, they’ve gotten so avid about shooting family dogs while on drug raids, that in their unholy enthusiasm, these contemptible morons have starting shooting each other.

A Memphis police office was recently shot and critically injured by Officer Byron Willis, 43, who claimed he was aiming at a dog, city officials said on November 8. Willie Bryant, 32, of the Organized Crime Unit, was taken to the Regional Medical Center at Memphis.

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Jane Phillips/The New Mexican
Steve Jenison, who worked as medical director for New Mexico’s medical marijuana program until his retirement, will voice his support for the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Act, Issue 5

Arkansas Doctors Show Support for Issue 5
A press conference featuring Arkansas doctors voicing their support of Issue 5, the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Act, will be held Thursday, November 1. Dr. Steve Jenison, chair of the New Mexico Medical Cannabis Advisory Board, will be the featured speaker. Dr. Jenison will speak about the success of the New Mexico program — its regulations, oversight and impact on the State of New Mexico, and about the similarity of the Arkansas Medical Marijuana Act to New Mexico’s own program.
Dr. Jenison worked at New Mexico’s Department of Health as the medical director for the medicinal cannabis program before he retired.

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Facebook
Chavis Carter was only 21 when he died of a gunshot wound while handcuffed in the back of a police patrol car 

Police in Jonesboro, Arkansas, are claiming the death of a man they detained on marijuana charges in the back of a squad car was the result of shooting himself in the head while his hands were cuffed behind his back.

The officers claim that Chavis Carter, 21, killed himself after being searched on suspicion of possessing marijuana, reports Steve Watson of Infowars.com. Officers had double-locked the handcuffs to make it harder for the lock to be picked, but they claimed Carter was somehow miraculously able to pull out a hidden gun, raise it to his head and pull the trigger while they were briefly away from the car.
The cops claimed they found a .380 handgun and a spent cartridge in the back seat next to Carter’s slumped body. They claimed the gun “must have been overlooked” when they searched Carter — twice.

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Photo: Chief Greenbud

​Musical artist Chief Greenbud has no problem openly advocating for cannabis, and his latest song and video on YouTube are no exception.

“You Can Smoke As Much As You Like” was written as a parody of Taco & Da Mofo’s cover of rapper T.I.’s song “Whatever You Like,” Greenbud told Toke of the Town.

“I was visiting Taco & Da Mofo’s website — they’re friends of mine from Memphis/Jackson, Tennessee — and they had a video on there for this song,” Greenbud told us. “I listened to it and was like, “Wow, this is a great song! These guys have a hit! I was sure of it.
“I know great songs and this was just great! I listened to it over and over again, like 20 times in a row,” Chief Greenbud told us. “And then I started hearing ‘Chief Greenbud’ words.
“It wasn’t until later that evening that I found out it was a song by the rapper T.I., and WAS a hit song! By that time, the parody was already on its way to being complete,” the Chief told us. “Then, of course, I had to call Taco and play it for him.

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