Search Results: mendocino county (81)

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As one of the original counties formed when California was granted statehood back in 1850, Mendocino County is known for its picturesque northern Californian coastline, its majestic redwood forests, and of course, its weed production.
Home to a short-lived, county-regulated, cannabis cultivation program for nearly two years, Mendocino now finds itself stuck between the citizens who willingly signed up for the program, and the federal government who is seeking to acquire all of their personal information for reasons unknown.

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Care2

In an ominous development, the United States federal government has subpoenaed financial records kept by Mendocino County, California, regarding its medical marijuana program, official sources have confirmed.

County officials on Tuesday confirmed that a federal grand jury issued a subpoena to the Mendocino County Auditor-Controller’s Office for records of fees paid to the county under its medical marijuana ordinance, County Code 9.31, reports Tiffany Revelle at the Ukiah Daily Journal.

The subpoena arrived in late October, according to one source. The reason for the federal request isn’t clear; neither local nor federal authorities have made a statement.
The federal subpoena seems to confirm the darkest fears of those within the medical marijuana community who are reluctant to cooperate or participate with state- and county-level medicinal cannabis programs, since the herb is still illegal for any purpose at the federal level. Many have argued that filing paperwork with any local or state government puts medical marijuana growers at risk of federal prosecution.

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Christopher Chung/The Press Democrat
Matthew Cohen takes cuttings from marijuana plants in order to clone them at the Northstone Organics Cooperative, in Redwood Valley, in 2010

​Mendocino County, California’s unique, income-generating medical marijuana growing permit program has been suspended pending the outcome of a Southern California court case challenging the legality of issuing permits for activities that are illegal under federal law.

“We’re waiting to hear something,” said Mendocino County Sheriff Tom Allman, reports Glenda Anderson at the Santa Rosa Press Democrat.
The permits — popular in the medical marijuana community for the peace of mind they fostered — allowed medicinal cannabis collectives to grow up to 99 plants, with a fee structure including inspections and zip-tie identification markers for each plant.

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Graphic: Reality Catcher
Mendocino County’s regulations on collective medical marijuana grow-ops and dispensaries are being hammered out Monday.

​Historically weed-friendly Mendocino County’s debate over regulating medical marijuana dispensaries continues Monday at 3 p.m., when the Human Services Advisory Committee of the County Board of Supervisors meets. The committee has been working since spring to hash out the county’s marijuana cultivation rules.

Supervisor John McCowen, who along with Supervisor Kendall Smith sits on the committee for monthly meetings, said the process has been delayed by numerous speakers opposed to the county regulating dispensaries.
“People are opposed to what the committee is doing, and they’re doing everything they can to impede our work,” McCowen told the Ukiah Daily Journal. “I suspect the real intent is that they are not in favor of any regulation that might actually apply to them,” he said.
“Interfering with the ability of the committee to make a decision would prevent regulation,” he said.

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All photos by Steve Elliott ~alapoet~
The glass entry case contained all 200 flower entries, and a couple dozen concentrate entries in the center wheel

The ninth annual Emerald Cup medical cannabis competition — a Humboldt County, California-based event in which only outdoor, sun-grown, organic marijuana and concentrates are allowed — was held this past weekend in Redway, and Toke of the Town was there.

The winning strain (left), entry #47, Chem Dawg, from Cannabis Aficionado

Two hundred strains of marijuana were entered (compared to last year’s 108 entries), as well as a couple dozen concentrates. Winners were selected, and the Grand Prize winner — entry #47, ChemDawg Special Reserve, grown by Leonard Bell and Elenah Elston (first female to take the top spot in this cannabis competition) — was announced. A very happy Leonard and Elenah, who together run the company Cannabis Aficionado, won an all-expenses paid trip to Jamaica for seven days and nights.
The winning strain, according to the lab results posted on Facebook by The Emerald Cup, contains 18.4 percent THC and 0.9 percent CBD.
Entrants in the Emerald Cup are judged by entry numbers only. It’s a completely blind judging process, i.e., the judges have no idea who grew it, what strain it is, or anything else about it. Entrants are judged on the high, appearance, smell, taste, and potency, with the high counting twice as much as the other components (and rightly so).

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Jean Hamamoto/Jean’s Artworks

Mendocino County Board of Supervisors and County Counsel hold closed-door meeting Tuesday after 9 a.m. public comment period
The Mendocino Board of Supervisors and County Counsel Thomas Parker met in a closed-door session Tuesday to discuss a pending federal subpoena for records held by the Sheriff’s now-defunct medical marijuana cultivation program, County Code 9.31, in which registrants were allowed to grow collectively up to 99 plants and were sold zip ties for $25 per plant to show they were being cultivated in compliance with state law.

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Santa Rosa Press Democrat
Mendocino County Sheriff Tom Allman: “We are, of course, supportive of legitimate medical marijuana here.”
 

Tell me what company you keep and I’ll tell you what you are.
   ~ Miguel de Cervantes, “Don Quixote de la Mancha Part II” (1615)
By Jack Rikess

Toke of the Town

Northern California Correspondent
Conventional wisdom for anyone living north of Santa Rosa is that marijuana is an integral component of California’s economy. In the beginning, growers were tolerated by the locals as misfits of society who had migrated north to avoid the world of straight jobs and or had fled to Mendo with the ‘back to the county’ movement to grow their organic beans and fruit.
Venerable local institutions such as the timber and fishing industries were leery of the young freaks with their torn jeans and rusting VW vans. Their fears were soon justified when that first generation found that there were endless acres of hidden land stashed in them there hills.
If a guy could find a secluded patch in the hills that was close to water and had sun, he had the makings of his first clandestine start-up. The Timber giants viewed the encroaching growers as threats to their land, their water, and to the political dominance that they held in NorCal since the mid-19th century. 
By the 1980s, the marijuana industry was entrenched and blooming, much to the chagrin of local law enforcement and community leaders. These former lazy rejects were driving new trucks, sending their kids to school, and buying their veggies at Safeway just like everyone else.  
Thirty years later it is estimated that cannabis industry generates around 13 billion dollars in annual sales. And that’s what is available to count. The timber industry is now a hollow trunk of its former self. The salmon and other fish populations have been so drastically depleted in the last few decades that fishermen can’t rely on their yield from season to season. Many fishing boats on the coast have gone belly up.

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County of Mendocino, California
Mendocino County Counsel Doug Losak: Busted for marijuana possession and a concealed pistol

Smoking marijuana and carrying firearms are such widely accepted behaviors in Mendocino County, California, it seems to have barely raised any eyebrows when the county’s top legal adviser was cited on Tuesday for possessing a small amount of cannabis and a concealed pistol in his Volvo.

Mendocino County Counsel Doug Losak faces a closed-door performance evaluation by the Board of Supervisors following his citation, reports Glenda Anderson at the Press Democrat, but meanwhile, he remains on the job.
Possessing three grams of marijuana is no big deal in Mendocino County, said Supervisor John Pinches. “It’d be like you stopped a woman and found a tube of lipstick in her purse,” he said.
Pinches said the allegations do not change his opinion that Losak is a fine interim county counsel who remains eligible to take on the job full time. Pinches discounted the allegation that Losak possessed a concealed weapon, a misdemeanor.

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Aeon Byte Gnostic Radio

Jack’s Timeline of the History of Cannabis


By Jack Rikess
Toke of the Town

Northern California Correspondent


Your Higher Power provides Cannabis to the Earth.
2737 BCE:  Shen Nung’s Pen Ts’ao, in China, refers to Cannabis as a “superior” herb in the world’s first medical text, or pharmacopoeia.
For the next several thousand years, Cannabis and Hemp are utilized in almost every major civilization in the Old World including everything from paper to sails.
1632 AD, America gets a new cash crop when the Pilgrims bring Cannabis to the New World in their carry-on luggage.
1776 AD: Declaration of Independence drafted on hemp paper.

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Northstone Organics
This was the beautiful cannabis garden at Northstone Organics on August 3. As you read this, federal DEA agents are destroying these plants, and patients are going without the medicine they need.

​Federal agents are reportedly raiding the garden of Northstone Organics, a pioneering participant in Mendocino County, California’s innovative “zip-tie” program to license medical marijuana gardens.

Mendocino County’s zip tie program, overseen by Sheriff Tom Allman, allows legal medicinal growers to purchase zip ties from the county to designate their plants as legal.
California NORML Coordinator Dale Gieringer denounced the raid as a “shameful and despicable” attack on California’s most successful legally regulated marijuana cultivation program.
“The DEA is doing nothing but encouraging lawlessness and disobedience to the law,” Gieringer said. “This is a victory for the Mexican cartels.”
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