Search Results: mother (413)

img_6513_1_Courtesy of Todd Mitchem

The first time Todd Mitchem’s mother was diagnosed with cancer, she says it scared him more than it did her. “He thought he was going to lose his mom,” Kenny Cummins says. “It was a very fearful time.”

When she was diagnosed with cancer a second time, she started using marijuana as medicine. “Once he saw what I was doing and how it was helping me, he started doing his own research,” Cummins says of her son. “He knew it was saving my life, and he knew it could help other people.”

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JackstonStormes.com
Jackson Stormes.


Jackson Stormes is one of the thousands of children in this country suffering from Dravet syndrome, a rare form of severe epilepsy that causes constant seizures and, generally, means a painful, poor quality of life for the children who have it. But for many, hope can be found in a low-THC, high-CBD cannabis extract that all but stops the seizures and allows kids to live a much more normal life. Sadly, Jackson hasn’t been able to access the high-CBD medicine where he lives in New Jersey, because that state’s program is being bogged down by inept program management and state leadership who would rather it all just go away says his mother, Jennie Stormes.
So with few other options, the Stormes family is uprooting and moving to Colorado where they know nobody, have no jobs but know that there is at least some hope for their son.

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Pink-haired ladies.

One day last October, just after 4:20pm, Candace Delaven Kelly answered a knock on her door to find state police and task force agents from the attorney general’s office “requesting permission” to enter and search her home, located in rural Buffalo Township , PA, where the biggest grass problems usually revolve around whose turn it is to mow it.
Ms. Kelly really isn’t all that different than most 64-year-old ladies. Locks of gray hair pulled back in a simple braid, a gentle smile, a modest mobile home in Pennsylvania, five grandkids, 64 pounds of dank hydro expertly sealed and packaged , and just shy of $400,000 in cash stashed in duffel bags under the bed. Still, she let the officers in that day, and they reported being “overwhelmed” by the powerful aroma of weed that blasted them when they walked through the door.

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A Thai woman caught with nearly 40 pounds of pot in a bus station in Sungai Petani last February will be hung for her “crime” according to Malaysian English-language news site, The Star.
Thitapah Charoenchuea, a 26-year-old single mother of a ten-year-old daughter, has maintained that she is was framed and that this was someone else’s drug deal gone wrong. She says that a man she only knew as “Ali” approached her before she boarded a bus after a brief stop on a bus from Changlun to Kuala Lumpur and asked Thitapah to take care of his bags and he would meet her in Kuala Lumpur.

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Florida.

A Tampa woman wants to get medical marijuana to save her 2-year-old daughter’s life. Although she’s still getting her cancer-stricken daughter conventional treatment, such as radiation therapy, Moriah Barnhart says that’s not enough.
And she wants options other than just chemotherapy. Medical marijuana, Barnhart says, would work better than chemotherapy, particularly considering chemo’s long-term effects.As it is, medical marijuana remains illegal in Florida. Broward-Palm Beach New Times has the rest of this heart-wrenching story.

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Saraland Police Department
Chelsea Mack, 23, was arrested and charged with “chemical endangerment of a child”

An Alabama mother was arrested last week after police claimed she smoked marijuana around her 23-month-old son.

Chelsea Mack, 23, was arrested and charged with “chemical endangerment of a child,” according to booking records, reports Theresa Seiger at AL.com.
The arrest resulted from one of those “suspicious smell” complaints from a neighbor that are feared by all cannabis users in non-legal states.
According to Cpl. Arlan Gaines, public information officer for the Saraland Police Department, the boys in blue “discovered that marijuana had been smoked in the residence while a toddler was present,” Gaines said.



When you speak to a cannabis festival audience — as I did Saturday at Hempstalk 2012 in Portland — you’d better have some attention-grabbers to share, since these good folks have typically been hearing speeches about marijuana all day.

One thing that I shared with the sizable crowd was the not-nearly-well-enough-known fact that babies born to mothers who smoke marijuana are both healthier and smarter than those born to women who don’t do any drugs or herbs at all.
​The prohibitionists tell us that the smoking of marijuana by pregnant women results in lower birth weights and less intelligent babies. The scientific research tells us that toking mothers have babies that are just as healthy, with birth weights just as normal, as babies born of non-toking mothers.

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Sabrina At NORML


NORML Women’s Alliance, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition and other Reform Organizations Team Up for “Cops & Moms Week of Action”
Mothers from around the country will join with law enforcement and students at the National Press Club on May 2 in honor of Mother’s Day. The press conference will launch a new coalition of national organizations that will represent mothers, police and students that seek to finally end the disastrous Drug War.
The NORML Women’s Alliance, Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), Students for Sensible Drug Policy (SSDP) and others will share powerful stories of losing loved ones to the criminal justice system, and the social repercussions of prohibition. The coalition will unveil the “Mom’s Bill of Rights” and highlight a series of activities around the country timed to Mother’s Day.
“‘Mother’s Day’ was derived out of an intensely political effort to organize women on both sides of the Mason-Dixon Line against the Civil War,” explained Sabrina Fendrick, coordinator for the NORML Women’s Alliance. “The reason mothers were made the vehicle was because they were the ones whose children were dying in that war.

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John Clanton/Tulsa World
Patricia Spottedcrow is serving eight years in an Oklahoma prison for selling $31 worth of marijuana to a police informant

A young Oklahoma mother of four who is serving an eight-year prison sentence on a first-time marijuana offense — for selling $31 worth of pot — has a chance at parole after the parole board unanimously agreed to hear her case early.

Patricia Spottedcrow, 26, is scheduled to appear on the Pardon and Parole Board’s docket between April 17 and 20 in Oklahoma City, reports Ginnie Graham at Tulsa World.
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