Search Results: rosenfeld (31)

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A medical marijuana proposal in Pennsylvania may make it to lawmakers by the start of summer, according to the head of the state Senate Law and Justice Committee.
Sen. Chuck McIlhinney, a Republican from Bucks County, says the committee will likely vote on a medical marijuana proposal before the Senate adjourns sometime later this month until early September.
The committee was in day two of hearings yesterday, marked by the appearance of federal medical marijuana patient Irvin Rosenfeld. Rosenfeld, tub of joints in hand, pleaded with the committee to do the right thing.

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President Barack Obama would arrest you for trying to purchase three-quarters of a ton of marijuana, but when his administration does exactly that it’s business as usual.
According to a Drug Enforcement Administration, the amount of marijuana being grown by the federal government at the University of Mississippi will increase this year to 1,430 pounds of pot.

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Kentucky state Sen. Perry Clark, a Democrat from Louisville, announced late last week that he will again be pushing medical marijuana legislation in his state. He made his plans public last Thursday at a party for supporters at his house.
Clark’s two previous attempts in 2012 and 2013 failed to even get a hearing. Clark says that isn’t going to be the case this session as legislators are poised to debate his bill August 21 in a Health and Welfare joint committee (no pun intended).

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If you combined Saturday Night Live‘s “Really?” segment with ESPN’s celebration of boneheaded NFL plays titled “C’Mon Man!” you would have my reaction to Derek Rosenfeld’s recent HuffPo article trashing our commander in chief. In his piece “President Obama Is the Last Person Who Should Joke About Marijuana”, Rosenfeld, who is the Internet communications associate at the venerable Drug Policy Alliance, took issue with one joke from the Prez’s annual White House Correspondents Dinner.
What was so egregious about Obama’s marijuana diss? It wasn’t one to begin with.

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wn.com

By Robert Platshorn
The Silver Tour
In 2011, with the help of Irv Rosenfeld and volunteers from NORML of Florida, I developed a free show that would entertain and educate seniors on the benefits of medical marijuana. It was something that no activist organization had ever done.
We “took it on the road.” Our first show was in front of an audience of six people, in an alleyway behind a Green Party storefront. The next show was in the back room in a Denny’s for 20 Libertarians.
When we were ready for the “Big Time,” Karen Goldstein, president of NORML of Florida, booked us into Ladies Auxiliary meeting at the Reform Synagogue of a South Florida Century Village. The show rocked! They lined up to sign letters and petitions demanding  “safe legal access” to nature’s most important medicine. The rest is history.

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~ alapoet ~
Toke of the Town editor Steve Elliott celebrating three years of high points and big hits

Three years ago today — actually, three years ago tonight, at 7:08 p.m. Pacific time — my THC-stained fingers hit the “Post” button for the first-ever story on Toke of the Town.

“The good thing about a free marketplace of ideas is,” I wrote, in the first sentence ever to appear on this site, “despite the best efforts of prohibitionists and their fear-mongering propaganda, the truth eventually prevails.”
More than 3,600 stories later — and with hundreds of joints, medibles, and bongloads littering my path — I’m still loving this gig, and judging by pageviews, so are close to half a million of you every month.

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Congress.org
Irv Rosenfeld smokes 10 to 12 federal medical marijuana cigarettes a day — and he has for 30 years

On Tuesday, November 20, Florida stockbroker Irvin Rosenfeld will celebrate 30 years of receiving 10-12 marijuana cigarettes a day from the United States federal government. Irv, 60, has now received and smoked more than 120,000 joints from the feds.
Rosenfeld — the longest surviving of the final four federal medical cannabis patients from a program that was started in 1978 and stopped under President H. W. Bush — and 13 others were “grandfathered” in what is called a “Compassionate Care Investigational New Drug” [IND] protocol.
“Even though I have a severe bone tumor disorder, I am in great health because of my cannabis use,” Rosenfeld said. “The sad part is that the federal government either doesn’t care or does not want to know how well I am.”

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Irvin Rosenfeld/Facebook

Irvin Rosenfeld has smoked more than 125,000 U.S. government marijuana cigarettes over the past 30 years. 

Editor’s note: Did you know that for the past three decades, the U.S. federal government has been providing a handful of patients with medical marijuana? The program grew out of a 1976 court settlement that created the country’s first legal cannabis smoker, Robert C. Randall, and the creation of the Compassionate Use Investigative New Drug Program.

By Irvin Rosenfeld
Federal Medical Marijuana Patient
President Obama, you now have to make a decision with regard to how the federal government will answer the groundswell of support nationwide not only for medical use of cannabis, but also for outright legalization.
 
Why am I writing? Of the final four federal medical marijuana (cannabis) patients in the United States, I am the longest surviving member, and I believe I have a unique voice on this issue. On November 20, I will be starting my thirty-first year of receiving 10 to 12 cannabis cigarettes per day for severe bone tumor disorders.
It serves as a muscle relaxant, an anti-inflammatory, an analgesic, and has kept my tumors from growing for more than 38 years. I am in great shape for someone with my conditions. That’s because I have the right medicine.

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Sun Post Weekly
Robert Platshorn spreads the truth about cannabis through The Silver Tour. Now the federal government has moved to silence him

Federal Officer Threatens To Return The Black Tuna To Prison

Robert Platshorn became the longest serving marijuana prisoner in United States history, doing almost 30 years in federal prison for importing Colombian pot in the 1970s. When he got out four years ago, Platshorn — a weed warrior through and through — didn’t take the easy way out and opt for a quiet retirement. Instead, he took up the cause of medical marijuana, launching The Silver Tour to bring the good news about cannabis to senior citizens.

Platshorn did his time, and when he got out, he started trying to make the world a better place and to help sick people. Now, even though he’s been officially released from the jurisdiction of the U.S. Parole Commission, the federal government is trying to silence him, ordering travel restrictions — which would effectively end The Silver Tour — and forbidding him to associate with fellow Silver Tour director, federal medical marijuana patient Irvin Rosenfeld.
The Showtime movie Square Grouper featured Platshorn’s story; federal agents dubbed him the Black Tuna. But today, millions of senior citizens call him the Pied Piper of medical marijuana, and often refer to him as “the secret weapon for legalization.” Last year, after being released from parole, he joined with Rosenfeld to found The Silver Tour to teach seniors the benefits of medicinal cannabis.
After getting home from a book signing tour (he wrote an autobiography, Black Tuna Diaries) and an international medical cannabis conference hosted by Patients Out of Time and the University of Arizona, Platshorn got a surprise visit from a new parole officer. The stranger demanded a urine sample and made it clear to Robert and his wife that Platshorn could be returned to prison if he refused.

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PotluckRx.com
Irvin Rosenfeld, 59, has received 300 joints a month from the U.S. federal government for almost 30 years


Irvin Rosenfeld Will Appear in Concord At Tuesday Morning, May 8 Press Conference
Irvin Rosenfeld, one of four patients who still receive medical marijuana from the U.S. federal government as part of the Compassionate Investigative New Drug (IND) Program (a little-known program that was closed to new applicants in 1992), will visit Concord, N.H., on Tuesday, May 8, for a press conference in support of medical marijuana bill SB 409.
The press conference will begin at 9:30 a.m. in the lobby of the Legislative Office Building. Rosenfeld will also meet with elected officials.
Rosenfeld, 59, has suffered since childhood from a rare bone disorder known as multiple congenital cartilaginous exostosis. He recently published a book called My Medicine: How I Convinced The U.S. Government To Provide My Marijuana And Helped Launch A National Movement.

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