Search Results: violence (239)

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Marvin Booker, who was killed at the hands of Denver Police while in jail.

More than three years after the filing of an excessive-force lawsuit on behalf of Marvin Booker, who died in Denver jail, the Denver City Council voted last night to pay Booker’s family $6 million.
This incident is hardly an isolated one. The original suit documents a slew of local law-enforcement brutality complaints, with the vast majority of them ending in settlements. There are so many cases, in fact, that it’s going to take two posts to share them all. Denver Westword first fifteen, featuring photos and text from the complaint.

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Julian Harris, a rookie officer in the Dallas Police Department’s South Central Patrol Division, was arrested Thursday morning after police were called to meet with an injured woman at Dallas’ Charlton Methodist Hospital. DPD detectives say that a fight between Harris and the woman at Harris’ Dallas apartment escalated into violence that left the woman hospitalized with serious injuries.
Harris was booked into Dallas County Jail just after 11 a.m. for aggravated assault. An emergency protective order was also issued to keep him away from the woman. In May, just nine weeks after Harris graduated from the police academy, he and another officer were praised for helping rescue a group of hooky-playing boys from a flooding creek.
The Dallas Observer has more.

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Flickr user 0_hai/Modified under Creative Commons license
Hit bongs, not spouses


In the business of analyzing the domestic abuse statistics and trends in our country, there is a term used called “Alcohol or Other Drug” involvement, or AOD. The data seems to show that the impairment, poor decision making and amped up aggression that is generally associated with abusing alcohol, or “Other Drugs”, commonly leads to physical violence in a marriage.
Studies over the decades have varied, but they typically show that 48% to 87% of the time that a person is physically assaulted by their spouse, the aggressor is juiced up on some booze.
So, what do the statistics say about weed?

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Caravan For Peace, Justice and Dignity


Despite fear, Mexican victims of Drug War on Caravan for Peace to visit El Paso-Juarez border to deliver clear message: End the War On Drugs
Families, including exiled residents of Juarez — epicenter of Drug War violence — and relatives of the more than 60,000 killed in the Drug War, go to DEA to demand alternatives to costly, catastrophic failure of drug prohibition, military aid, and the open gun market
Members of the Caravan for Peace with Justice and Dignity will gather on Tuesday in front of the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) division office in El Paso to demand accountability from the principal United States government agency charged with prosecuting the drug war in both Mexico and the U.S., and to seek a dialogue about the costs of this war — and how to bring it to an end.
Families carrying large and small pictures of loved ones lost in Mexico’s Drug War will join Mexican exiles and U.S. families and communities hurt by the Drug War in actions and community events designed to call attention to the human and economic toll of this war on both sides of the border.

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Graphic: The Political Junkie

​Minneapolis Mayor R.T. Rybak has taken to Minnesota’s airwaves in a misguided attempt to blame violence at the hands of criminal gangs on marijuana consumers.
“When you pay for marijuana, you are paying for the bullet that goes into the head of someone on the streets,” he told the Star Tribune, in one instance of his absurdly inflated rhetoric.
But the mayor’s logic is tragically flawed. By trying to blame violence entirely on marijuana’s consumers, Mayor Rybak is conveniently ignoring the central role in gang violence played by marijuana prohibition and the politicians who support it, according to the Marijuana Policy Project (MPP).
medical_marijuana_dea_raid6.jpegadmin | Toke of the Town

It doesn’t really change anything for now.

Here’s your daily dose of pot news from the newsletter WeedWeek.

The DEA confirmed that marijuana extracts containing CBD are illegal. The agency explained that the notice, published in the Federal Register, does not change its enforcement priorities.

Cannabis attorney Bob Hoban responded, “The sky is not falling; however, this is a very concerning move by the DEA…What it purports to do is give the DEA control of all cannabinoids as a controlled substance.”

More than 30% of cannabis businesses are very concerned about Trump’s presidency, according to a Marijuana Business Daily Poll. In particular, they’re worried about the U.S. attorney general nomination of prohibitionist Alabama Senator Jeff Sessions (R).

In Slate, I wrote that the industry is cowardly, hypocritical and stupid for not fighting the Sessions nomination. Legalization activist and journalist Tom Angell tweeted that I’m “ WAY off base” and then got into an interesting Twitter exchange with Bill Piper of Drug Policy Alliance, which is opposing the nomination.

The U.S. Senate extended the Rohrabacher-Farr amendment, which prohibits the federal government from interrupting state MED programs, until April 28. Rep. Dana Rohrabacher (R- Calif.) said he’s confident that it will be extended again. He also wants it to be expanded to include state REC programs.

Rohrabacher and Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.) are forming a “ cannabis caucus” in Congress. Congress also announced that it will perform a comprehensive review of the war on drugs in search of alternative policies in the Caribbean and Latin America.

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, called for changes in U.S. drug policy, as he accepted the Nobel Peace Prize.

Mexico’s Senate passed a MED bill, amid a new wave of drug violence.

Maine’s REC recount has been suspended until the new year. With 30% of the votes counted, yes remains ahead. After Montana’s MED vote, state laws need to be rewritten.

A little known aspect of busts.
Here’s your weekly dose of cannabis news from the newsletter WeedWeek.
An investigation in Reason finds “ widespread, unchecked violence against pets during drug raids.” Two Detroit officers it found have killed more than 100 dogs each.

The owner of Med-West, a San Diego extraction company that was raided by local authorities in January is seeking a return of his frozen assets. $324,000 cash was seized during the raid. No criminal charges have been filed.

Police departments are becoming more tolerant of applicants’ past pot smoking.

Las Vegas police said they would still pursue possession arrests, though the district attorney said they wouldn’t be prosecuted.

With Trump’s election, federal inmates incarcerated for non-violent drug offenses fear their window to win clemency is closing. “Some of these people are bad dudes,”  Trump said at an August rally “These are people out walking the streets. Sleep tight, folks.”

CBS tells the story of Harry Anslinger, a leading figure in passing the Marijuana Tax Act of 1937, which made it illegal.

The New Yorker sent Adrian Chen to the Philippines, where President Rodrigo Duterte is waging a brutal drug war. The article is subtly titled “ When a Populist Demagogue Takes Over.

In California, police are concerned about home grows.

Time Magazine calls hmbldt vape pens one of the 25 best inventions of 2016.
Ozy discovers “ happy pizza” in Cambodia. A Barcelona cannabis club was closed by authorities. There’s a cannabis/comic book convention today in Colorado Springs.

Vice learns how to make “ the most potent weed oil.”

The Washington Post recommends four books to understand the new weed reality. They include Marijuana: A Short History, by John Hudak, Jesse Ventura’s Marijuana Manifesto, Sacred Bliss: A Spiritual History of Cannabis by Mark S. Ferrara and Cooking with Cannabis by Laurie Goldrich.

The New Yorker published a pot-industry cartoon. It isn’t especially funny.

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Josue Rivas / OC Weekly
“Your pain is our pain.”

The story of 43 missing Mexican students from Ayotzinapa, Guerrero refuses to disappear, as their whereabouts still remain a mystery more than two months after local police clashed with them on September 26. Anger continues to fuel protests in Mexico against the government over corruption, violence and ties to narcos. And on this side of the border, activists are holding their own rallies and bringing attention to the cause.

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Another night of violence, looting and property damage plagued Ferguson last night with the grand jury’s announcement that Darren Wilson would not be charged with the killing of Michael Brown. Although the initial reaction on South Florissant Road in front of the Ferguson Police Department seemed peaceful at first, the violence many were expecting ultimately prevailed.
Here is the arrest data provided this morning by the St. Louis County Police Department: 61 total arrests last night in Ferguson. There were seven for unlawful assembly, one for assault, one for arson, 29 for burglary second, six for misdemeanor possession of stolen property, ten for misdemeanor receiving stolen property, one for felony receiving stolen property, seven for trespassing, one for unlawful possession of a firearm, one for marijuana possession. Yes, the cops actually arrested someone for marijuana possession in the middle of all of this. Riverfront Times has more.

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