Search Results: william breathes (73)

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Craig LaRotonda/Denver Westword

Toke of the Town “highly” recommends that you head on over to our sister Voice Media site, Denver Westword, to check out marijuana dispensary critic William Breathes’ take on the history of cannabis in Colorado.

Breathes’ absorbing six-page essay gives the background on the cannabis plant and the rich culture surrounding it, and what led us up to this historic point, with legalization measures being voted on Tuesday in Colorado, Washington and Oregon.
Did you know that Colorado passed a law against pot in 1929 — eight years before marijuana was outlawed coast to coast? Minorities, unfortunately, were clearly the focus of that measure; a Denver chaplain told the Rocky Mountain News that the new law against cannabis was “necessary” to control the growing Mexican population.

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Pot Party Photos
No bong-cleaning required.

​​My friend and colleague William Breathes, the nation’s first marijuana/dispensary reviewer employed by a major newspaper chain (me being the second), is a busy man. Breathes is so busy with marijuana news, in fact, Denver Westword is looking to hire a college student to fill what is likely the first medical marijuana dispensary critic internship in history.

Now, before you get all hyperventilated, I should tell you that you don’t have to be a medical marijuana patient to get the nonpaying gig; “there’s plenty of stuff to cover about medical marijuana that doesn’t require you to smoke legal herb,” Breathes said in Wednesday’s announcement.
“In fact, you’ll mostly be updating dispensary listings and reviews, covering a pot meeting or two and generally helping out with our Colorado cannabis coverage,” Breathes said. “Previous blog experience helps, but isn’t required — we’ve all got to start somewhere.

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Photo: Aaron Thackeray
This glass football bong came in at #4 on William Breathes’ list, but it’s way higher on mine.

​I know, I know. You’re all bummed out because you didn’t get to attend KushCon II in Denver this past weekend. I feel your pain, brah.

But all is not lost! Intrepid Denver Westword pot reporter William Breathes has got our backs! He was there in the trenches at KushCon and he thoughtfully compiled a list — with pics! — of his 10 favorite products at the show.
“Last week I talked about how much I hated holiday shopping,” Breathes wrote.
“After going to KushCon II over the weekend, I’ve changed my mind.”
And with Xmas just around the corner — hey, stoner, it’s five days away, man! — I know some you could sure use some gift ideas right about now.
I guess you can tell which one was my favorite, from the Aaron Thackeray photo on the right. 
Go on over to Westword for the complete list.

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Photo: Robyn Twomey

​Pot connoisseur William Breathes over at Denver Westword has written a funny, but on-the-money piece called “Top 5 reasons why your budtender hates you,” and it’s hard to beat for some Friday afternoon reading from the Village Voice Media empire.

“Let’s face it, being the person who sits behind a counter weighing out ganja all day long might not seem like the hardest job in the world, and there are plenty of people who would take that gig just for the leftover shake at the end of the day,” Breathes writes.
“But that doesn’t mean it isn’t work.”

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WBAL
Marijuana critic William Breathes at work

​A Denver man gets paid to smoke cannabis and write about it as one of the first professional medical marijuana critics in the country.

Denver’s Westword alternative newspaper has hired the man, who goes by the name “William Breathes,” to review marijuana dispensaries and the quality of the cannabis they sell, reports WBAL TV.
“He has his journalism degree,” said a Westword editor. “He was a good writer, and he could punctuate and he could spell, which was very different than a lot of people who applied for the job.”
Breathes said he has been smoking marijuana for 15 years to ease chronic stomach pains. Now he smokes pot to pay the mortgage.
William Breathes

The most prominent anti-marijuana group in the country is touting the absence of language in a key Congressional funding bill that has protected the medical marijuana industry in Colorado and beyond from federal prosecution in recent years. But a cannabis advocate dismisses the suggestion that this development could soon unleash a law-enforcement blitzkrieg against the MMJ biz.

In the words of Tom Angell, who leads the national organization Marijuana Majority, “This is a gigantic nothingburger.”

Scott Lentz

“Some people are very lucky — everything they touch works for them,” laments Steve Horwitz, owner of Ganja Gourmet. “But for whatever reason, ever since I opened this business I’ve had a black cloud around me. Pretty much nothing has worked the way it should have or could have.”

Horwitz, a seasoned salesman in his fifties with a hearty Long Island accent and a gold chain around his neck, doesn’t take no for an answer, though; he just shifts his approach and tries again. Over the past eight years — the period during which the marijuana industry exploded in Denver — he’s changed his business model four times. He opened Ganja Gourmet at 1810 South Broadway in late 2009 as a medical marijuana restaurant (and one of the first spots William Breathes reviewed), turned it into a takeout joint in 2010, transformed it into a medical dispensary in 2011, then changed it into a medical/recreational store in 2015. Now, to keep up with the times, Horwitz is gearing up to stamp his candy logo on wholesale edibles and partner with a smoke room once social consumption is allowed.

 

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Brandon Marshall

 

Update, June 14, 2016: We’re back, and we hope we’ll see you again.

Since 2009, Toke of the Town has brought you the biggest marijuana news and loudest pot views from across the country — and around the world. Along the way, we’ve covered the huge progress many states have made towards legalization and wondered why others are so far behind. The country still has a long way to go, but things are looking up — and we have our fingers crossed that 2015 will be another big year for legalization.
But Toke won’t be around to see it — at least, not in its present form. This is Toke of the Town’s final day of publication.
Don’t worry: We’re not quitting the movement. We’re just returning the focus of our marijuana coverage to our local Voice Media Group papers. You can still read William Breathes’ weekly pot reviews and Ask a Stoner column at Westword.com, where they started, and you can continue to follow him on Twitter and Facebook. And you can keep following Toke on Facebook and Twitter, too, for the latest marijuana news from all our papers.
Many thanks for reading and supporting us for the past five years! We couldn’t have covered the marijuana community without such a strong one reading us.
And all our archives will remain online, because we wouldn’t want you to lose access to our serious reporting on issues of medicine and our lighthearted coverage of stoner movies.
Light one up for us, won’t you?

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Late last week Oklahoma and Nebraska filed suit in the U.S. Supreme Court to halt Colorado’s implementation of Amendment 64. Basically, both states say they are tired of dealing with marijuana that crosses the border. In the suit, they claim that Colorado cannabis ties up law enforcement agencies and is wreaking havoc on police and state trooper budgets. And now it seems another neighbor to the east is mulling jumping on the bandwagon.
Kansas Attorney General Derek Schmidt has been debating whether to sue Colorado for months, according to his staff. Jennifer Rapp, spokeswoman for Schmidt, told KMBC News that Schmidt is still “weighing his options.”
Our own William Breathes has the full story over at the Latest Word.

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William Breathes.
Girl Scout Cookies grown in Colorado.

Nebraska and Oklahoma have filed a federal lawsuit against Colorado, urging the feds to shut down Colorado’s marijuana industry that they say is bleeding over into their state and costing their taxpayers millions.
Which would be valid if cops in those states weren’t bringing it on themselves by profiling Colorado drivers, pulling people over for made-up infractions and busting people for minor amounts that they probably wouldn’t have searched for in the past. Oh, and don’t think for a second that these cops – all of which are milking their department overtime pay for court appearances – mind the busts at all. Basically: they’ve brought the “problem” on themselves, are personally reaping financial benefit for it, and now want Colorado taxpayers to chip in to pay for their scam.

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