Author Kate Simmons

lit_on_lit_3_lindsey_bartlettLindsey Bartlett

“Be a crazy, dumb saint of the mind…,” proclaims Daniel Landes, standing in a third-floor attic space in south Denver that feels nice, warm and present.

At first glance, this class may look like your average creative-writing workshop, with pens sprinkled across two tables in the center of the room, alongside desk lamps and composition notebooks. But Lit on Lit is a new kind of creative-writing class, one that puts something different on those tables: a bowl of cannabis and rolling papers to help spark creativity.

This is the first writing class in the country that invites attendees to smoke legal cannabis during the brainstorming session and the prompts.

socialconsumptionKate Simmons | Toke of the Town

Much of Denver’s fourth Social Consumption Advisory Committee meeting on March 11 was spent discussing the proposal to allow marijuana clubs, which is currently before the Colorado Legislature.

SB 17-184, the Private Marijuana Clubs Open and Public Use bill, passed a Senate committee last week in a bipartisan five-to-two vote and is on its way to the Senate floor. Denver’s advisory committee, which was set up after the passage of  I-300, wants to ensure that as the city implements the voter-approved social consumption initiative, it does not interfere with the language in the state’s bill.

firstsale_opt_opt_1_Brandon Marshall

After hours of testimony on Wednesday, March 8, a Colorado House committee approved Senate Bill 17-17, which would make people suffering from PTSD and other stress disorders eligible for medical marijuana, in an 8-1 vote. It now moves on to a full vote of the House.

“We’re in the final stretch, and the momentum has really kicked in,” says Cindy Sovine-Miller, a lobbyist working with the Hoban Law Group to help shepherd the proposal through the Colorado Legislature. “There were two and a half hours of testimony of people who were opposed to this bill — testimony from very credible people. The testimony from the people who are actually impacted by this really won the day.”

timneville@NevilleforCO

The Colorado Legislature is loaded up with marijuana measures this week, including proposals to establish pot clubs and to add PTSD to the list of patient ailments that can be treated with medical marijuana. And on March 8, the Senate Business, Labor and Technology committee approved Senator Tim Neville‘s bill to allow medical marijuana delivery systems for patients and businesses.

Senate Bill 17-192 calls for a state licensing authority to create an endorsement for existing medical marijuana licenses, permitting them to make deliveries to patients in need in areas where medical marijuana is currently sold.

cannabisoutsideWorld Cannabis Week

In a 34 to 1 vote, the Colorado Senate passed the Post-Traumatic Stress Bill; today, March 8, it’s scheduled for a public hearing before the House State Affairs Committee.

Adam Foster, lead attorney on the case, says it’s time for Colorado to join the 21 states with medicinal cannabis laws that have approved PTSD as a qualifying condition.

“Colorado has been the leader in so many different regards with regard to the cannabis plant, but we are very much behind the curve as far as using medical cannabis to treat PTSD,” he says. “Every other state that has considered the issue has approved medical cannabis for the treatment of PTSD, and Colorado is really an outlier in that regard.”

4217656499_a747f7ee60_oMoppet

Marijuana is now legal in more than half the country, but related areas of the law are taking a while to catch up. Women are still being punished for exposing their babies to marijuana; under child-abuse and child-neglect statutes, women can be arrested for child endangerment or have their babies taken away.

Even so, little is known about whether an infant can be harmed if an expectant mother uses marijuana during pregnancy or after birth. Dr. Thomas Hale is working to change that.

marchharedinner-daniellelirette059Danielle Lirette

On Saturday, March 4, Curious Appetites hosted a cannabis-infused dinner at Cluster Studios that took everyone down the rabbit hole. An “Eat me” sign sat on the edibles table; on the bar was a sign that said, “Drink me,” and on the dab bar, a sign urged guests to “Smoke me.”

Those guests were given an hour to mingle, then invited to sit down at a long, single table, where chef Hosea Rosenberg and his staff from Blackbelly served a four-course meal, paired with four strains of cannabis. Hungry to know more? Here are ten tips for an Alice in Wonderland-themed dinner.

1 2 3 21