Author Toke of the Town

Herbert Fuego

Weed geeks love to test the same strain at different dispensaries. The Grow-Off is a type of Pepsi challenge whose results show which shops specialize in flavor, potency and yield — and which shops to avoid altogether. Last summer, when it was announced that over forty of Colorado’s commercial cannabis growers would be pitted against each other using the same mystery genetics, I couldn’t decide what I wanted to know more — who would win, or what the special strain was.

It took more than half a year, but the results are finally in: The secret mandatory ingredient was Race Fuel OG (also known as Race Fuel), a mix of High Octane OG and Face Off OG, two OG-heavy strains with names that leave little to the imagination. The Herbal Cure in Denver took home first for flavor and potency, while mountain-based High Country Healing saw the most yield.

As difficult as the scoring probably was, I would have paid a lot of money to be a judge on that panel. Luckily, some of the participating dispensaries are now selling their cuts of Race Fuel to the public. A quick whiff of the strain’s diesel and OG scents, which are like a combination of citrus cleaner and gasoline, will make tokers realize just how fortunate they are.

Lindsey Bartlett

Our calendar is getting loaded for 4/20. Alongside more now-traditional events, such as the 420 Rally at Civic Center Park and Snoop Dogg’s annual Wellness Retreat show, there are some new ones on the roster, including a spring dinner put on by the Mason Jar Event Group, its first in the Mile High City.

Mason Jar is the “high society” organizer of the most coveted cannabis pairing dinners around. Think sun-soaked tables where Top Chef-worthy food is passed around along with joints, bongs and vaporizers; where the cannabis-industry elite, who appear the exact opposite of stoner stereotypes, thrive inside their own bubble.

Scott Lentz

“Some people are very lucky — everything they touch works for them,” laments Steve Horwitz, owner of Ganja Gourmet. “But for whatever reason, ever since I opened this business I’ve had a black cloud around me. Pretty much nothing has worked the way it should have or could have.”

Horwitz, a seasoned salesman in his fifties with a hearty Long Island accent and a gold chain around his neck, doesn’t take no for an answer, though; he just shifts his approach and tries again. Over the past eight years — the period during which the marijuana industry exploded in Denver — he’s changed his business model four times. He opened Ganja Gourmet at 1810 South Broadway in late 2009 as a medical marijuana restaurant (and one of the first spots William Breathes reviewed), turned it into a takeout joint in 2010, transformed it into a medical dispensary in 2011, then changed it into a medical/recreational store in 2015. Now, to keep up with the times, Horwitz is gearing up to stamp his candy logo on wholesale edibles and partner with a smoke room once social consumption is allowed.

Sunday After Next Films

There are only two types of regular pot smokers: those who smoke a little extra on 4/20, and liars.

I get it: A lot of you are grownups now and much too busy to dedicate an entire day to cannabis. Me, too. But even if you’re years removed from your gravity bong days and only puffing a few times a week, indulging a little extra on the day of all haze is nothing to be ashamed of.

As a 4/20 veteran with a big-boy job for a few years now, I’ve learned how to appropriately ring in the holiday without being a dirtbag – and, most important, without rubbing shoulders with dirtbags. Want to celebrate 4/20 like an adult? Follow a few of these steps and you’ll feel a lot less shameful Friday morning.

Danielle Lirette

Colorado has been a 4/20 destination for more than a decade, and the allure of tax dollars helped spur a legalization movement that now brings tens of millions of consumer dollars into the state every April.

Data from the Colorado Department of Revenue shows that Colorado made $2.49 million from the state’s 2.9 percent marijuana sales tax in March 2016. (That includes medical and recreational dispensaries and doesn’t count the 10 percent retail marijuana tax and other local taxes specific to cities and counties.) In May 2016, Colorado made $2.76 million from the same tax. But in April 2016, that tax total was significantly higher than in the preceding and following months: $3.29 million. Dispensary sales aren’t just rising in April; they’re rising annually, at an extremely fast rate.

Westword

Dear Stoner: I’m about to get on a flight, and I hear that TSA has changed its rules about allowing you to carry on marijuana. What’s up with that?
Flying High

Dear Flying High: You heard wrong, sadly. In an April 5 article on MassRoots, Tom Angell reported this: “It’s official: The federal government doesn’t care if you bring medical marijuana on airplanes.” Angell had noticed that the “What can I bring?” page on TSA’s website had changed the red “No” next to checked and carry-on baggage for medical marijuana to a green “Yes.” He quickly took a screen shot of the page and wrote an article, and just as quickly, TSA’s Twitter replied with this: “@cannaadvisors: We’re sorry for any confusion. A mistake was made in the database of our new ‘What can I bring?’ tool.” TSA’s web page also changed the “Yes” back to “No” under medical marijuana. Tom Angell’s credit, he updated the article as TSA corrected itself. But confusion remains.

Mountain Medicine Facebook Page

A Denver-based medical marijuana edibles manufacturer has recalled nearly 1,000 products from dispensary shelves because of potentially harmful marijuana, according to an announcement from the Denver Department of Environmental Health.

Approximately 980 Mountain Medicine products are subject to a recall because they were made with marijuana flower from Good Meds, a Denver wholesale marijuana cultivator. Good Meds voluntarily recalled its marijuana flower, concentrates and edibles earlier this month after city inspectors found “a lack of effective controls in place to prevent and detect pesticide contamination, and the presence of potentially unsafe pesticide residues.”

The pesticides in question contained fungicides tebuconazole and myclobutanil, according to the Department of Environmental Health.

Kyle Huninghake

What was once Colorful Colorado has been turning greener since recreational cannabis became legal, especially on 4/20. For music fans, the holiday has been attracting some of the greatest talent around, for block parties and concerts alike, making this state a place where you can match your extracurricular smoking activities with some of the best local and national music acts, all for the love of everything green.

Music lovers, here’s what’s going on:

Kate Simmons | Toke of the Town

When Amendment 64 passed in 2014, adults in Colorado not only had the right to possess recreational marijuana, we gained the right to grow it. However, growing the potent, stanky cannabis many of us are used to smoking is no easy task for a rookie. Home growers spend years perfecting their lighting, nutrients, feeding schedule and more, but few have the time and bandwidth to breed their own genetics.

Most experienced home growers will tell you that the best way to grow your own is by planting reliable seeds, growing your own clones from a mother plant or finding a trustworthy clone breeder that doesn’t have anything to lose from selling you his or her best genetics – but for newbs and those too lazy to build a community, dispensaries provide a convenient place to start your home-growing journey.

To my chagrin, not too many pot shops in Denver sell clones anymore, making them hard to track down even after a Google sesh. Here’s a list of dispensaries in Denver that sell the green little guys (in alphabetical order), with more to be added as I find them.

Westword

Dear Stoner: An old friend is visiting soon, and I was thinking of welcoming him with a marijuana goodie bag. What should I put in there? I have about $150 to spend.
Heidi

Dear Heidi: I’ll leave the artful arrangement of the gift basket up to you, but I can help with the grocery list. For a visitor who’s new to legal cannabis, you’ll want to start with the three staples: flower, edibles and concentrates. An eighth of bud shouldn’t be more than $45 to $50 after tax at the pricey spots, so that leaves you $100 for more goodies.

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