Browsing: Medical

Herbert Fuego

The phrase “drink the Kool-Aid” is commonly used when talking about letting hype or peer pressure affect a decision, but it has pretty morbid origins. The saying stems from the 1978 Jonestown tragedy, in which over 900 followers of cult leader Jim Jones died from drinking a cyanide-laced version of the juice mix. Don’t let that stop you from enjoying a glass at your next cult meeting, though: Just add a little more sugar, and that cyanide tang will go right away.

Toxic Kool Aid, a strain popping up in a handful of dispensaries around Denver, wouldn’t be my first choice for infusing a Keef Cola, but I’ll happily stuff a gutted cigarillo with it.

Kate McKee Simmons

Cannabis’s federally illegal status makes it difficult to conduct licensed clinical research on the plant and products made from it, hampering medical and commercial advancements in cultivation, extraction and ingestion. Colorado legislators got tired of waiting for the feds, and in May passed a bill that allows for state-approved research and development licenses for clinical studies on potency, chemical composition, agriculture and other areas.

Herbert Fuego

After a week of nothing but clean, active highs from Lamb’s Bread and a few days off the flower during a family trip, going back to a strain with a lineage stretching further than a sequoia would’ve been too much for my simple mind to process. It’s hard to find something easygoing yet delicious in an industry focused on potency, but with nearly 175 retail dispensaries open now in Denver, I was bound to come upon at least one rose among the weeds.

Scott Lentz

Changes to Colorado’s cannabis industry are on the horizon. The Marijuana Enforcement Division has been holding meetings for industry stakeholders and government officials in order to iron out the details of recently passed laws and new regulations, and the public is encouraged to attend those meetings and provide input.

Illustration by Alvaro Diaz-Rubio

Over the past several months, New Times dug into the backgrounds of the seven companies’ current and former owners, executives, and partners. These marijuana moguls include some of the state’s best-connected and savviest businesspeople. Many also have backgrounds that haven’t been explored in-depth. Among them are a real-estate developer once tied to political corruption, a hedge fund manager who recruited two gambling tycoons as investors, an attorney embroiled in a burgeoning Tallahassee FBI probe, a Gainesville entrepreneur who bought a franchise from one of the largest cannabis companies in Colorado, an ex-IBM executive, a Miami mortgage broker, and some of the largest nursery operators in Florida.

Shutterstock.com

Marijuana is sold for both medical and recreational purposes in Colorado, but it’s definitely not sold at the same prices for both purposes. Not only is the cost of flower, concentrates and edibles cheaper for medical patients, but the taxes on those purchases are around 25 percent lower.

After paying a doctor’s consulting fee – usually anywhere from $60 to $100 – and the Colorado Medical Marijuana Registry application fee of $15, state medical marijuana patients are in the hole for a decent chunk of change. But buying enough medication can make up for the initial cost outlay.

Roxana Gonzalez /Shutterstock

Casara Andre is stuck between a rock and a hard place. In fact, so are all of her clients and some of her colleagues. The owner of Scheduled Relief veterinary clinic and a practicing veterinarian, Andre thinks cannabis products have medical benefits for pets, but she can’t legally recommend cannabis for her furry patients, and there’s little published research on the benefits of cannabis for animals to support her beliefs.

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