Browsing: News

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it’s another security concern dispensaries face.

The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

Ryan Kunkel, owner of Seattle dispensary Have A Heart alleges that a recent robbery was an inside job.

Mexican police executed more than 42 suspected gang members on a ranch last year.

The Justice Department said it would stop using private prisons on grounds that they’re more dangerous and less well run than public prisons. The move does not apply to most prisoners in the country, who are incarcerated under state laws.

A photo from the Kansas State Patrol Facebook page.Facebook

A photo from the Kansas State Patrol Facebook page.

For years, we’ve written about reports of marijuana profiling.

The claims consistently maintain that law enforcers in jurisdictions beyond this state are more apt to stop vehicles for marijuana-related searches if they’re outfitted with Colorado license plates.

Such tactics were always controversial. Now, a federal court says they’re totally unjustified.

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None of them touch the plant.
The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.
Four cannabis companies made the Inc. 500 list of fastest growing private companies. They are the media site Leafly, Apeks Supercritical, a manufacturer of extraction equipment, Marijuana Business Daily, and GrowersHouse.com, an equipment retailer. Inc. spoke to MBD’s Cassandra Farrington “ High priestess of marijuana business intelligence.”

Marijuana Business Daily estimates that tourists in Colorado bought almost $100M worth of REC last year, about 17% of the state total.

The flag of New Mexico

It’s for her sick child.

The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

New Mexico mom Nicole Nuñez is suing the state over “arbitrary” supply limits. Nuñez’s eight month old daughter has a seizure disorder. A Michigan judge ruled that seedlings count as plants.

The four Colorado doctors suspended for overprescribing large plant counts will have to go through administrative hearings to try and get their licenses reinstated.  A judge tossed out a lawsuit they filed.

Here’s some news that will add a delightful lift to your Monday: There’s a Tommy Chong’s meet-and-greet contestcoming to Denver. Yes, you can hang with the legend himself when he comes to town for the official release of his Chong’s Choice cannabis line, selling now exclusively at these eight dispensaries.

Not only will you get to meet him, but the winner of the contest has been promised his or her very own toking session with Chong. You will be smoking Chong’s Choice line of cannabis grown by Verde Natural.

Blue Line Protection Group trains security personnel to protect your weed, and it’s hiring. The cannabis security company is hosting a career fair at its new Denver headquarters at 5765 Logan Street from noon to 7 p.m. on Monday, August 22 — which means today.

Blue Line has seen an increased demand for its services in the cannabis industry and is looking to hire thirty to forty people to fill both part-time and full-time armed and unarmed security jobs across Colorado, but primarily in the metro Denver area.

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 Use patterns are changing.
The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

A study found that daily marijuana use is growing rapidly, especially among users who are “poor and lack a high school diploma.” “What’s going on here is that over the last 20 years marijuana went from being used like alcohol to being used more like tobacco, in the sense of lots of people using it every day,” according to one of the researchers. (See the study here.)

The number of U.S. cannabis users is set to exceed tobacco users within a few years.

Tommy Chong's weed line is on sale in select stores now, including Northern Lights (pictured above.)Lindsey Bartlett

Tommy Chong’s weed line is on sale in select stores now, including Northern Lights (pictured above.)

Tommy Chong’s weed is coming to a pipe near you. Seven dispensaries in Colorado quietly began carrying Chong’s Choice flower this week. The modest yet carefully thought-out cannabis line consists of three strains, marketed simply as Chong’s Choice Indica, Sativa and Hybrid. The genetics of the three strains: the indica is Grape Stomper, the hybrid is Blue Dream, and the sativa is Durban Poison.

Chong’s Choice is modest for a celebrity line, relying less on packaging and more on overall bud quality. The Chong flower is grown by Verde Natural, a small Denver cultivator whose storefront on East Colfax Avenue is medical-only, but which sells wholesale recreationally, as is the case with the Chong line. Verde is best known for its eco-conscious practices, including grows that are solar-powered, soil-amended and pesticide-free.

Brett Levin

As personal marijuana grows proliferate throughout the state, so do the problems that can accompany them. Entrepreneur Alison Helsley thinks she may have found a solution: Rooms to Grow, a space where individuals can grow their own plants away from their private residences. But she’s had to deal with growing concerns in her business’s home base of Cañon City.

Home grows can present a variety of challenges for all parties involved. Growers — medical patients, recreational users and caregivers — face spatial, financial and practical challenges, as well as having to comply with restrictive plant caps. Landlords grapple with potential property damage caused by their tenants’ grows. And neighbors often complain about noxious smells coming from next door. 

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It’s a controversial theory.

The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

In Esquire, author Don Winslow argues that legal weed is responsible for the opiate epidemic. As demand for Mexican marijuana has fallen, The Mexican Sinaloa Cartel “increased the production of Mexican heroin by almost 70 percent, and also raised the purity level, bringing in Colombian cooks to create ‘cinnamon’ heroin as strong as the East Asian product. They had been selling a product that was about 46 percent pure, now they improved it to 90 percent.
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