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Days after a letter from Attorney General Jeff Sessions surfaced, asking congressional leaders to revoke federal protections for medical marijuana, senators have introduced a bill that would protect medical marijuana patients in states where it’s legal while also removing cannabidiol (CBD) from the Controlled Substances Act and expanding research on marijuana.
Senators Cory Booker (D-New Jersey), Mike Lee (R-Utah), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-New York), Rand Paul (R-Kentucky), Al Franken (D-Minnesota) and Lisa Murkowski (R-Arkansas) introduced the Compassionate Access Research and Respect the States (CARERS) Act on June 15. The bill would protect medical marijuana users from federal prosecution, allow Department of Veterans Affairs doctors to recommend medical marijuana to veterans, and loosen multiple restrictions on cannabis research and medical compounds.

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How’d that famous Shel Silverstein poem go about sick little Peggy Ann McKay? “What’s that? What’s that you say? You say today is Shatterday?”

Goodbye, we’re doing dabs all day.

Nothing makes us more excited to rip hash than seeing others rip hash. Or seeing pictures of hash. Or anything to do with hash. But what really gets us all warm and tingly inside are shatter slabs. Even if they’re not your favorite form of THC, those sappy, gleaming chunks of THC are a sight to behold. Don’t believe us? Check out what Colorado’s hash-makers aren’t whipping up! (Stoner high-five if you get that.)

Danielle Lirette

The stereotype of the bleary-eyed, long-haired stoner gazing through a cloud of smoke is on its way out, replaced by a picture of happy, business-clad partners sharing a joint after returning home from the office. A landmark new study conducted by BDS Analytics reveals that cannabis users in Colorado and California are some of the happiest, most successful and well-adjusted adults around.

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The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws is sending a clear signal to the administration of President Donald Trump following the latest negative words and deeds aimed at legal marijuana in Colorado and beyond by Justice Department officials Jeff Sessions and Rod Rosenstein. In the words of NORML policy director Justin Strekal, “Should the Department of Justice decide to throw out the Tenth Amendment and respect for states’ rights as they govern their own intrastate commerce, they’re going to have a fight on their hands.”

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Fox News, which has a history of portraying Colorado pot smokers as apathetic morons, recently ran a piece suggesting that the Western Slope community of Durango has been overtaken by panhandlers in the wake of recreational cannabis legalization. The head of a business organization that created a Facebook video ripping the article as false says the Fox News reporter with whom he spoke seemed disinterested in any information that contradicted his conclusion that weed had put the town on the fast road to hell even though the supposed link between homelessness and cannabis has been widely discredited.

Eaze

The cannabis industry is booming, and the cannabis tech sector is no exception. There’s the “Tinder for Tokers,” the “Uber for Weed” and the “Amazon of Cannabis.” As Sheena Shiravi, head of public relations for cannabis delivery app Eaze, says, “Cannabis is a brand-new industry, and every single part of the supply chain provides opportunities for an app.” Here are five digital tools that are helping enthusiasts and amateurs cultivate a deeper relationship with marijuana.

Lindsey Bartlett

Mixing gourmet food and premium cannabis was a hot topic for white-collar America after the New Yorker‘s April feature story on the “Martha Stewart of edibles,” a Portland food writer who holds cannabis-infused dinners at her home. The story was nothing new to us in the Mile High, of course, where there have been plenty of edibles, both legal and illegal, to choose from for quite some time.

But what if you want to separate weed and food while still enjoying them together?

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Most users consider marijuana addiction a myth, but Colorado State University’s psychology department takes it seriously…so much so that it’s focusing on marijuana in  its new master’s program on addiction counseling.

“Historically speaking, people thought you couldn’t get addicted to marijuana. We know that’s not true in the scientific community, but that hasn’t penetrated public opinion yet,” says Bradley Conner, associate professor and director of addiction counseling at CSU.

According to Conner, a shortage of certified addiction specialists and a rise in drug addiction have created a gap in accessible treatment. With his team’s undergraduate and master’s programs at CSU, he hopes to fill that void while teaching students counseling methods tailored for marijuana abusers. That’s something that hasn’t been covered enough since Colorado’s legalized marijuana industry started in 2014, Conner adds.

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