Herbert Fuego

Remember dial-up Internet? I can still hear that scratching beep on the phone line. Cable and DSL made life a little easier and porn a little clearer, but wi-fi made that era look like the Stone Age. Wireless Internet has been a game-changer: sharing information, bar debates, family dinners — it’ll never be the same. White Fire OG Kush, known as WiFi OG for short, came around in the early 2000s, about the same time I got rid of my ethernet cord. It didn’t change the world like Facebooking on your phone at Starbucks has, but it’s made a mark on dispensaries all the same.

Brandon Marshall

The drafters of Denver’s social cannabis consumption initiative have been vocal about their dissatisfaction with the city’s finalized rules and distance requirements for businesses applying to open a consumption area. Now they’re taking it a step further, threatening to sue the City of Denver if less restrictive rules aren’t put in place.

Courtesy of Smart Approaches to Marijuana

Kevin Sabet, the president and CEO of Virginia-based Smart Approaches to Marijuana, has become arguably the most influential critic of marijuana legalization in the United States. But in an extended interview on view below, he fights against the perception that he’s a one-dimensional prohibitionist along the lines of U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Sabet stresses that he and his organization, shorthanded as SAM, take what he sees as a sensible approach to cannabis by arguing in favor of treatment rather than jail time for users in trouble and advocating for greater study of the substance to determine the best ways to utilize it medically.

Courtesy Instant Media Press

Bud and Breakfast is a cannabis-friendly getaway that could make for a good place for the ceremony or perhaps a nice honeymoon retreat.

As summer inches toward autumn, another perennial shift looms on the horizon: wedding season. September remains the main target of the marriage-industrial complex, and there has been a recent emergence of weed-friendly weddings as California has made headway on legalizing cannabis.

At a weed wedding, guests may no longer feel compelled to sneak out for a puff when there’s a bud bar for the bridesmaids, a joint in the groom’s boutonniere or a weed-infused wedding cake. “Planning a weed wedding is like planning any other wedding,” says Cat Goldberg, CEO of marijuana event company WeedBar L.A. “We work with the couple to match their specific needs. Like different strains of cannabis, no two weddings are alike.”

Whether a couple wants to offer guests an alternative to alcohol or simply celebrate their nuptials with some nugs, the modern marijuana marriage has an abundance of options.

kdshutterman/Shutterstock.com

Astrological vibes will take hold of America on August 21, when a solar eclipse will stretch across the United States. It will be close to complete in Colorado, and the path of totality is just a few hours away, in Wyoming.

In fact, Wyoming is considered one of the best places in the West to view the eclipse, with between 250,000 and 500,000 people expected to head into the state, taking advantage of its clear skies and place in the eclipse’s direct line. Towns from Jackson to Torrington are on the path, and Casper, four hours up I-25, is even holding a five-day festival leading up to the eclipse; the Astronomical League is holding its annual convention there just before the eclipse.

But the Wyoming Association of Sheriffs and Chiefs of Police has a warning for travelers coming from Colorado: Don’t bring your weed.

Discussion of marijuana reform somehow made it into the special session, even though there is little chance any related bill will pass.

State Representative Joe Moody, an El Paso Democrat, must know there’s more of a chance that the Texas Legislature will do a group rendition of the macarena than there is that House Bill 334 will get through the Legislature during the special session. Still, Moody held a public hearing on a bill he filed this week, pretty much just for the heck of it.

ile photo by Susan Slade Sanchez/L.A. Weekly

In a proposal that was widely panned by pot shops and legalization advocates, the city in June revealed possible regulations for Los Angeles cannabis businesses that would have continued the problematic policy of treating even the most legit enterprises with “limited legal immunity.”

Many cannabis folks were up in arms. Voters in March approved Proposition M, which was pitched as an initiative that would finally grant licenses to weed sellers and producers. But the measure ultimately left the fine print up to City Hall. The groups representing collectives in town opposed the limited-immunity approach in proposed regulations forwarded as a way to implement M. This week, City Council president Herb Wesson submitted additions to those regulations that would endorse full licenses for pot businesses.

Courtesy Toke.tv

On Toke.tv, a marijuana-centric livestreaming app based in downtown L.A., users broadcast themselves rolling joints, packing bowls and admiring their bongs. Between hits, they talk about what’s on their mind.

User @silenttoker expressed her annoyance that a McDonald’s had run out of Fanta Orange. Another woman held her cat up to the camera. A recent @treeofgreens livestream begins with a guy laid out on the couch before he repairs to a patio to take dabs with his buddies. The video lasts 92 minutes.

Their audiences send their appreciation with short messages and a constant stream of heart and cloud icons that bubble up on the screen. Like Facebook Live or Periscope, the streamers see the messages and can respond in real time. Cultivators, glassblowers and other specialists also have found an online home on the app.

PBS NewsHour YouTube channel

Colorado’s cannabis industry has been holding its collective breath ever since President Donald Trump nominated Jeff Sessions for attorney general. And since he was sworn in, Sessions, a proponent of the war on drugs, hasn’t been shy about saying that marijuana should remain illegal federally.

In a proactive move, on April 3 the governors of four states with recreational cannabis businesses up and running at the time — Alaska, Colorado, Oregon and Washington — sent a letter to Sessions and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, urging that federal officials “engage with us before embarking on any changes to regulatory and enforcement systems.”

Gustavo Turner

Jeff Hunt, the vice president of public policy at Colorado Christian University, invited Westword and others to share his op-ed titled “Marijuana Devastated Colorado, Don’t Legalize It Nationally” earlier this week. Although we declined, USA Today obliged in spreading Hunt’s reefer-madness gospel on August 7. And Hunt’s piece — as well as the alleged facts, studies and sources he used to hammer home his point — elicited quite the response.

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