Search Results: alcohol (744)

gruvi-beer-courtesy-2019 (1)Courtesy of Gruvi

Cannabis legalization has not only spurred a wide variety of new industries, but it’s reinvigorating some old business models. Noticing the growing interest around terpenes — plant compounds found in cannabis and hops (and fruits, flowers, coffee and pretty much anything else grown on Earth) — Niki Sawni decided to start a line of non-alcoholic beverages geared toward cannabis users.

Using terpenes to make non-alcoholic IPAs, sours and even wines, Sawni’s beverage company, Gruvi, has been able to breathe new life into sober drinks; Gruvi products are now on the shelves of 45 liquor stores and craft breweries around Colorado. We recently sat down with Sawni to learn more about how drinking terpenes without the booze can affect our experiences with cannabis.

img_8184_1_Kate Simmons | Toke of the Town

On March 30, Representative Jared Polis reintroduced the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act, as colleagues introduced four other measures in the U.S. House of Representatives that would protect states with legal marijuana from threatened action by the Trump administration.

Under the Obama administration, the Department of Justice followed the 2013 Cole Memo, which essentially protected states with legalized medical or recreational marijuana from federal interference. When Polis originally introduced the Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol Act in 2015, it did not pass — perhaps in part because states with legal marijuana did not feel threatened.

marijuanaalcohol.jpegadmin | Toke of the Town

More stringently, in other words.

Here’s your daily round-up of pot-news, excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Download WeedWeek’s free 2016 election guide here.

Researchers at UCSF argue that the cannabis industry should be regulated more like tobacco than alcohol, for public health reasons. Sales should be “subject to a robust demand reduction program modeled on successful evidence-based tobacco control programs,” they write.

marijuanaalcohol.jpegadmin | Toke of the Town

Potentially a model for the country as well.

Here’s your daily round up of pot news, excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek.

Politico explains how California’s REC initiative, if passed, will disrupt the existing supply chain and provide a windfall to distributors. No other state has a similar model.

A majority of California Latinos oppose legalization, though it’s somewhat more popular among younger voters.

Despite continuous warnings from alarmists who say heavy marijuana use is “soaring among young people,” the most recent survey conducted by Healthy Kids Colorado Survey (HKCS) found marijuana is less of a threat to the state’s youth than other substances. HKCS is supported by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment and collects anonymous student information on multiple health topics.

Trends among high school students remain comparable to the national average and have not risen since the state voted to legalize recreational marijuana in 2014. In fact, the numbers have remained relatively stable since 2005, according to the report.

Four out of five high school students have not used marijuana in the last 30 days, a statistic that, according to the survey, “remains relatively unchanged since 2013.”

Even though more than half of Colorado’s high school students report that marijuana is easy to access, well below half have actually tried the drug.

Of the 17,000 middle and high school students from over 157 schools surveyed across the state, 21.2 percent reported that they currently use marijuana. With the national average at 21.7 percent, this survey corroborates prior evidence that legalization has not increased use among teens.

Alcohol remains the most used substance by minors across the state, a statistic that aligns with national trends. Thirty percent of Colorado’s youth report that they currently drink alcohol and 16 percent said they’ve gone on a binge in the last 30 days. Almost 60 percent say alcohol is relatively easy to acquire.

For more on the marijuana statistics in the survey, read Michael Robert’s article.

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Any Highlands Ranch High School student thinking about pre-gaming before heading to Saturday night’s Homecoming dance should think twice. The school will be doing breathalyzer tests on all students before they can gain entry, and those who score a positive for alcohol use will be tested again — this time by a member of law enforcement.
Read on to see how Highlands Ranch High Principal Jerry Goings says reasons behind the new policy are sound and why he doesn’t believe it will lead down a slippery slope.

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In a January interview with The New Yorker magazine, President Obama now famously stated, “As has been well documented, I smoked pot as a kid, and I view it as a bad habit and a vice, not very different from the cigarettes that I smoked as a young person up through a big chunk of my adult life. I don’t think it is more dangerous than alcohol.”
Since that interview, ESPN sent a reporter into NFL locker rooms across the league asking 100 professional football players whether or not they agree with President Obama’s comments. The players’ replies are not very surprising, but unfortunately, neither is the NFL’s reaction to just blow it off.

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Since legal sales of recreational marijuana got underway on January 1, state agencies have made a big push in regard to so-called stoned driving. Witness the Colorado Department of Transportation’s “Drive High, Get a DUI” campaign, which features a series of public-service announcements with a light touch.
Data revealing the scope of the problem has been hard to come by, as we’ve been reporting for months. But this weekend, we got anecdotal evidence from a Larimer County checkpoint that driving under the influence of alcohol remains a much, much larger issue than does its drug-related counterpart.

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Denver Westword

Earlier this week, Westword and High Times magazine filed a lawsuit against the State of Colorado in regard to regulations that restrict recreational marijuana advertising to publications that are deemed “adult” by a state-mandated formula. Attorney Steve Suskin, who represents Westword on behalf of the paper’s parent company, Voice Media Group, says the complaint was filed because the state’s current rules could violate the First Amendment. Meanwhile, the paper’s publisher emphasizes that when it comes to such ads, Westword is very much open for business.
“We are 100 percent confident of the legality of where we are in terms of taking this business,” says Scott Tobias, who is also the CEO of Voice Media Group, a company that owns publications in Los Angeles, New York and other major U.S. cities in addition to Denver. “From the very start of Amendment 64, we committed ourselves to being a reference point to the medical marijuana community, and now the retail marijuana community. We remain committed to strong partnerships and support of these businesses.”
The story does not end there…go straight to the source for the rest at Denver Westword

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In the latest issue of the New Yorker, President Barack Obama says marijuana isn’t more dangerous than alcohol and is actually less so in at least one significant way.
Obama, who admits to smoking pot during his younger years but has spoken critically about the substance, hasn’t turned into a cheerleader for weed.
But Marijuana Policy Project spokesman Mason Tvert is still upbeat about the President’s statements and hopes they signal more progressive cannabis policies on the part of his administration. Denver Westword has more.

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