Search Results: cbd/ (6)

Shutterstock.com/Canna Obscura

Shopping for retail marijuana in Denver is like time-traveling both into the future and back to the past. You can buy products here that aren’t available anywhere else in the world, and that includes on the Internet. Unlike clothes, electronics, books and even groceries, you can’t order cannabis delivered to your door in Colorado (although legal states Nevada and Oregon allow it, our state currently bans that option). And while the consistency of infused products’ effects has greatly improved since required potency and homogeneity tests began, it’s just as hard to keep up with cannabis trends today as it was when this all began in January 2014.

Newer, stronger forms of concentrates, more refined edibles brands and innovative infusion techniques are improving at a rate that’s tough for industry insiders to track, much less the average consumer. Just when you think you’ve figured out live resin and pressed rosin, distillate and isolate show up. Think lotions, patches and balms are the only topicals out there? Think again. These days, picking out the right product can feel more like spinning a roulette wheel of pre-filled vaporizers and CBD/THC mixtures than making an educated choice. To help you catch up, we’ve picked out our favorite cannabis products for the season, choosing edibles, drinks, concentrates and accessories that go exceptionally with hoodie weather and pumpkin-patch vibes.

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Denver Westword.


Editor’s note: Our sister paper, the Denver Westword, runs a weekly marijuana advice column, Ask a Stoner. Today, we bring you one of the more frequently-asked questions:
Dear Stoner: My dad lives in Aurora, and we’re coming out for his 75th birthday party. My wife has never smoked pot (or anything, not even cigarettes) but suffers from chronic migraines. She wants to try a pot edible, but I heard that pot can only be purchased by non-residents in smokable form. Can non-residents buy edibles? –Randy

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New Jersey State Senate Bill 2842 and Assembly Bill 4241 were passed in the final week of June and were rushed immediately to Governor Chris Christie’s desk to sign into law. Passing by a lopsided 25-13 margin in the Senate, and an uneventful amendment process in the General Assembly, the bill is intended to ease dogmatic restrictions on what many consider to be a farce of a medical marijuana program.
Early last month, on July 9th, the bill was still sitting, unsigned, on Gov. Christie’s desk as he partied with Bon frickin’ Jovi. Unconcerned, Governor Christie has repeatedly stated that there is “no crisis” in the state’s medical marijuana program, even though the state’s only dispensary has been closed since June due to a “lack of inventory”.

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Jason David
Jayden David’s father Jason reports that his walking is better — Jayden was previously non-ambulatory. He can now swim, an activity he adores, without having a seizure

“But, what about the children?!” 
Why children with Dravet syndrome are using cannabis and why consistent access to their medicine is important
By Sarah Russo
CannCast.com
Parents of some children with Dravet syndrome, a rare and severe type of epilepsy, are using CBD-rich cannabis to treat their condition. Finding this medicine is difficult and getting consistent access to quality medicine is even more so.
Dravet syndrome is a severe myoclonic epilepsy whose onset occurs in infancy. Those with Dravet may have upwards of 100 seizures per day. The most intense episodes can last for 15 minutes to up to an hour. There is no known cure. The best available treatment is to minimize seizures, which are precipitated by environmental stress.
The longer a person has an epileptic attack, the higher the likelihood that prolonged damage could occur. Dravet seizures are so intense and long that brain development is delayed. In severe cases, a seizure may cause cardiac arrest. Each day can vary drastically for those with Dravet. There are a variety of pharmaceutical anticonvulsants available, but none of them eliminate seizures, and all have side effects.
Recently, a group of families affected by Dravet have turned to CBD-rich cannabis as a treatment for their children. These families have formed a Facebook group that allows members to provide support, compare notes, and to share experiences.

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Photo: CBD Science
The new Alta California line of tinctures includes high CBD (Healing), balanced CBD/THC (Tranquility), and high THC (Euphoria).

​A California-based company has introduced three cannabis based medicinal extracts (CBMEs), also known as tinctures, derived from organic plant material. They offer patients a choice of low, medium or high euphoric component THC, balanced with the healing cannabinoid CBD.

According to CBD Science LLC, based in San Francisco, “These are the first CBME products on the market with certified potency and purity, scientifically calibrated and documented.”
Steep Hill Lab certifies the propylene glycol (“double alcohol”) CBMEs as Safe Cannabis™, free of pesticides and mold. The lab also documents potency through THC and CBD levels.
The CMBE products, branded Alta California, are so far available to patients with valid recommendations at the following nonprofit dispensaries: Medithrive in San Francisco; Crème De Canna in Santa Cruz; and Magnolia Wellness in Orangevale, California.