Search Results: fire it up (557)


Toke of the Town’s Song of the Day, “Fire It Up,” was written by Don Ray and guitarist Billy Smart at the request of the Florida Cannabis Freedom Festival, which took place last weekend.

The song has also gotten the attention of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) and the Don Ray Band will be performing at the NORML Southeastern Conference concert on December 15 at the Douglas Corner Cafe in Nashville, Tennessee.
You can buy “Fire It Up” on ReverbNation by clicking here.
EXPAND Tomas Del Coro via Wikipedia

James Terry gave United Parcel Service 32 years of his life.

The company canned him in April the first time he failed a drug test.

Terry tested positive for marijuana and amphetamines. But, as he explained to his bosses, he has a valid Arizona medical-marijuana card and a doctor’s prescription for Adderall. They wouldn’t budge.

Now Terry, a 53-year-old African-American man from Buckeye, is taking on the parcel giant in federal court.

There’s a reason your cousins in the Midwest can pound more Coors Lights than you: For five months out of the year, it’s too fucking cold to do anything else in Minnesota, Wisconsin or anywhere else that calls a soft drink “pop” instead of “soda.” Luckily for us in Colorado, most of our winter days are spent on the slopes or enjoying a sunny day in Denver. And even when we do get stuck inside, keeping out of the cold, we have better options for inebriation.

Because of the body high and relaxing effects they tend to give, indicas and indica-leaning hybrids of cannabis strains are your best choice for warming up after a few hours in frigid temperatures. They relax rigid joints, warm up the chest and get your stomach ready for a hot meal. Don’t believe me? Try any one of these ten winter indicas by the fire and see for yourself.

Thumbnail image for Nesletter-cover-1.jpg


Enjoying its sixth year of showcasing the hottest innovations, and innovators, in the deeply talented glassblowing industry, the Degenerate Flame Off (or DFO) kicks off today in Eugene, Oregon.
Hosted annually since its inception by the beloved local glass supercenter, Cornerstone Glass, along with Northstar Glassworks, the DFO brings together the cream of the crop in the functional glassblowing world, along with mobs of their fans, for a scene that is equal parts competition and celebration.

Bryan-Gonzalez.jpeg
Rose Law Group
Border Patrol Agent Bryan Gonzalez was fired merely for verbally expressing frustration with the war on marijuana and voicing support for LEAP

Maybe Frank Zappa was right to ask, “Who are the Brain Police?” Remarks from a Border Patrol agent expressing dissatisfaction with the Drug War — made on the job to a fellow agent, a few feet from the Mexican border — later resulted in the agent’s firing after his remarks were passed along to headquarters.

Bryan Gonzalez, a young agent stationed in Deming, New Mexico, was in his Border Patrol vehicle next to the border when he pulled up to a fellow agent to chat about the frustrations of the job, reports Marc Lacey at The New York Times.
If marijuana were legalized, Gonzalez told the other agent, the drug-related violence across the border in Mexico would cease. He then mentioned an organization called Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), consisting of former cops, judges and prosecutors who favor ending the War On Drugs.
“Now that The New York Times has featured LEAP and the emerging debate in the law enforcement community about ending the ‘war on drugs,’ hopefully this will lead to more sympathetic cops getting in touch with us and joining the movement,” LEAP’s media relations director, Tom Angell, told Toke of the Town on Monday morning.
“I’m already hearing from a lot of news outlets that don’t normally cover LEAP that the Times story caught their attention,” Angell said.

joint.jpeg
Photo: LawyersandSettlements.com
If you live in Washington state, it doesn’t even matter if medical marijuana is legal. You can be fired for using it — even legally — even if only if your off hours.

​Employers in Washington state are allowed to fire employees who fail a drug test, even if they have a valid medical marijuana authorization, the state Supreme Court ruled on Thursday.

The court ruled that TeleTech Customer Care, a Colorado-based company that handles customer service for Sprint from its facility in Bremerton, Washington, was allowed to fire a woman for failing its required drug test, even though she is a legal medical marijuana patient, reports J.B. Wogan at the Seattle Times.
The plaintiff was pulled out of her training class after just a week and fired on the spot on October 18, 2006, because she failed a pre-employment drug screen. She had a valid medical marijuana authorization from her doctor, and sued under the name Jane Roe.

iStock_000011849735XSmall.jpeg
Photo: Stoel Rives World of Employment

​Can medical marijuana patients be fired from their jobs for legally using cannabis with a doctor’s authorization? That’s the question before the Washington Supreme Court, which heard arguments Tuesday from attorneys in the case of a medical marijuana patient fired by a telemarketing firm for failing a drug test in 2006.

Voters in 1998 would be “flabbergasted” to hear someone could be fired for legally using medical marijuana away from work, in this case to alleviate migraine headaches, argued Michael Subit, attorney for the woman called “Jane Roe” in court proceedings to protect her identity, reports Josh Farley at the Kitsap Sun.

“The Legislature understood (voters) were giving broad permission” to use marijuana medicinally, argued Subit, “…and that’s why they [legal medical marijuana patients]can’t be fired.”
But James Shore, attorney representing Teletech, claimed the law passed by voters provides only a defense in court to patients who have a doctor’s recommendation to use marijuana. Shore said Washington’s medical cannabis law does not offer employment protection.
“An employer could permit it in the workplace if they want to,” Shore said of medical marijuana. “But they don’t have to.”

zach.jpg.jpeg
Photo: YouTube
Burn that thing down, Zach!

​Actor Zach Galifianakis blazed new trails on late-night TV Friday as he produced and lit a joint on HBO’s Real Time with Bill Maher.

Maher, a longtime supporter of marijuana law reform, welcomed Galifianakis to his talk show, where a panel discussion ensued about California’s upcoming Proposition 19 vote on whether to legalize, tax and regulate cannabis, reports PopEater.
“It’s a tricky thing politically to jump on that bandwagon [and vote for the legalization of marijuana]because I think that maybe people still see it as taboo,” Galifianakis, the star of Hangover, said.
Pulling a joint and lighter from his coat pocket, Galifianakis fired up and started puffing, pausing to allow conservative reporter and fellow guest Margaret Hoover to sniff the joint, confirming it was the real thing.

Screen shot 2010-07-16 at 12.28.10 PM.png
Graphic: Medical Marijuana & Hemp Expo

​A three-day expo which starts Friday in Toronto is being called the first convention ever held in Canada to promote the use of medical marijuana. Organizers said they expect as many as 30,000 attendees from around the world.

The Medical Marijuana and Hemp Show is being held at the Metro Convention Centre, the same downtown location where G20 leaders met three weeks ago, reports Linda Nguyen at The Vancouver Sun.
The event will feature exhibitors from around the planet, educational seminars with doctors and a hemp fashion and cooking show.
Courtesy of Alertmeter.com

Today, February 21, as we’ve reported, Denver’s National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws branch is taking part in a lobbying day at the Colorado State Capitol during which lawmakers will get the chance to learn about a major element in the group’s attempt to fix drug-testing laws that put cannabis users at risk of being fired for lawful use. Specifically, they’ll be able to try out Alert Meter, which tests for impairment rather than relying on blood or fluid draws that Denver NORML sees as undependable and unfair.

1 2 3 56