Search Results: medical (3738)

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Publish an incorrect dispensary address, and you could go to jail.

You heard right: Under a proposed law, any local group or company who publishes an incorrect address for a dispensary would be guilty of a felony, and subject to a mandatory $10,000 for each violation.

That’s just one of several new ideas by a trio of prohibitionist Arizona lawmakers who want to tamper with the state’s medical-marijuana program and prevent an adult-use measure from ever making the ballot.

EXPAND Tomas Del Coro via Wikipedia

James Terry gave United Parcel Service 32 years of his life.

The company canned him in April the first time he failed a drug test.

Terry tested positive for marijuana and amphetamines. But, as he explained to his bosses, he has a valid Arizona medical-marijuana card and a doctor’s prescription for Adderall. They wouldn’t budge.

Now Terry, a 53-year-old African-American man from Buckeye, is taking on the parcel giant in federal court.

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Arizona residents on probation or parole would no longer be able to consume cannabis to relieve their pain or other ailments under a newly proposed law.

Arizona Republican Vince Leach, R-Saddlebrookeintroduced several anti-medical-marijuana bills last year that went nowhere, including one that would have stopped the state from offering registration discounts to food-stamp recipients. This time, he’s targeting people on probation…

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Stay strong, Arizona medical-marijuana patients.

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions and local authorities have little power to stop you from consuming, possessing, or even growing cannabis under state law.

The 2010 Arizona Medical Marijuana Act contains a sort of “Dracula clause“: If freedom-hating prohibitionists try to kill it, it will come back to life and bite them. Read it in the Phoenix New Times.

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United States Attorney General Jeff Sessions issued a memo rescinding the Cole Memorandum and other federal pot protections dating back to 2009 on January 4. Colorado’s elected officials — from Governor John Hickenlooper to Mayor Michael Hancock to the entire congressional delegation — were quick to condemn the move and vow to fight any attempt to prosecute law-abiding businesses in this state. But in the meantime, how does the Sessions memo affect you?

Ray Stern | Toke of the Town

Chris Martin is a medical-marijuana pioneer. He’s also a biker, ex-con, and father of five — a nice guy with a rough side, lots of tattoos, and a head full of business ideas. He got out of prison in February after serving a two-year sentence on a weapons violation related to a 2012 raid on his first medical-marijuana company, Zonka.

His Zonka chocolate bars and other edibles became popular for a while not long after Arizona voters passed the 2010 medical-marijuana law. But this was before state-authorized dispensaries; Martin sold the infused candy to unauthorized compassion clubs. Police raided the clubs and Martin’s home, finding guns (he says they belonged to his older sons) that he shouldn’t have had in the house because of a past felony conviction.

Now Martin, his family, and friends are back in the medical-marijuana business. And this time, they may have struck gold — or, rather, struck oil. CBD oil. Read Phoenix New Times in-depth article on the new oil boom.

Jacqueline Collis

The effects of legalized cannabis on Colorado are still being debated, but the state’s top health official believes that we’ve been pretty responsible about this pot thing. Dr. Larry Wolk has been the chief medical officer and executive director of the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment since 2013, a period that includes the state’s implementation of regulated adult-use cannabis in 2014, and he’s confident enough about the process that he’s telling other states and even countries that not only has the sky not fallen in Colorado, but we’re actually doing all right.

Nate Nichols

A Navajo County judge’s recent ruling about medical-marijuana extracts could lead to popular dispensary products like vape cartridges and edibles being taken off the shelves…

The problem is that the law, which was approved narrowly by voters in 2010, includes a definition for marijuana and “any mixture or preparation thereof.” Yet Arizona’s criminal code on pot, written prior to 1960, defines both marijuana and a strange substance called “cannabis,” which comes from marijuana resin but apparently isn’t marijuana. It’s officially a “narcotic” under this old law, carrying a stiffer felony designation and penalties.

See the story in the Phoenix New Times.

 

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