Author Toke of the Town

DNC tokeLindsey Bartlett

Democrats have adopted a platform that their members are trumpeting as the “most progressive platform in party history” — and when it comes to marijuana, Dems aren’t just blowing smoke. The Party of the Donkey has taken a position on marijuana that no major political party in the United States has taken before.

The preliminary draft of the platform, released on July 1 by theDemocratic National Convention Committee, asserts that states should be “laboratories of democracy on the issue of marijuana.”

It goes on to say states that wish to decriminalize marijuana should be allowed to do so.

 

ask_a_stonerWestword

Dear Stoner: I’ll be visiting Colorado this summer, and everyone is telling me I can only buy a quarter-ounce. Is that true? If so, is that for every shop, or can I buy more at another?

Dear Based: It used to be that way, but not any longer! In June, Governor John Hickenlooper signed a law bumping up the out-of-stater limit to an ounce, so you don’t have to limit yourself to a quarter-ounce at each shop you visit. Not that I’ve met many people who go through a quarter in a day — but they’re out there.

Yogi D and his dog want to teach you a thing or two about cannabis and yoga practice.420 Yoga Retreats

Yogi D and his dog want to teach you a thing or two about cannabis and yoga practice.

Yogi D has a solution to the nation’s “stress epidemic”: a weed-and-yoga retreat in Aspen from September 30 through October 2 called the 420 Yoga Retreat. A 25-year yoga veteran who was dubbed “America’s relaxation expert” by CNN, Yogi D has just recently come out of the dark as a cannabis user. All stereotypes of the “lazy stoner” went up in smoke as the influential and respected yoga instructor admitted to the world that he has been pairing yoga and cannabis for the past twenty years.

“For this retreat, we want to reach the state of our dogs. Be in the moment, love unconditionally, playful, no judgment, love and care,” says Yogi D. “The crazy thing about yoga is, I’ve been doing it for 25 years, and I feel like a total beginner. I get more than my students. I get a state of bliss from teaching. I am a yoga addict, that’s for sure.”

interpening_lindsey_bartlett_22_Lindsey Bartlett

Want to take your weed-snob knowledge to the next level? Under president Max Montrose and CEO Jim Nathanson, theTrichome Institute offers a series of cannabis courses, culminating with the “weed sommelier,” or interpening, class.

In his interpening — technically “interpreting terpenes” — class, Montrose regularly guides cannabis enthusiasts through the ins and outs of cannabis. For four solid hours, everyone from managers of dispensaries to growers, budtenders and owners learns how to pick up a plant and detect everything they need to know about the cannabis from its smell, bud structure and leaves. If you pay attention and pass a test at the end of the class, you’ll win official certification as a weed sommelier.

David Schubert, the senior author of the Salk Institute study on THC and Alzheimer's disease.Courtesy of the Salk Institute

David Schubert, the senior author of the Salk Institute study on THC and Alzheimer’s disease.

A new study suggests that marijuana may have potential for protecting brain cells against Alzheimer’s disease.

Published in the June 2016 issue of Nature, the study found that tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive compound in marijuana, and other active cannabis compounds could block the progression of the disease.

Lab tests by the Salk Institute, a Southern California, non-profit research organization, showed that marijuana compounds could remove harmful amyloid beta proteins, the plaque that accumulates on brain cells, which is a hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease. The compounds in the study also significantly reduced cellular inflammation, a major contributor to the onset of the disease.

For more on the study, read L.A. Weekly‘s article on the effect of marijuana on Alzheimer’s disease.

BuzzFeed reporter Amanda Chicago Lewis on Merry Jane's show, Highly Productive.Courtesy of Merry Jane.

BuzzFeed reporter Amanda Chicago Lewis on Merry Jane’s show, Highly Productive.

Housed in a nondescript brick building in West Los Angeles, there’s a revolution brewing in marijuana media.

And Snoop Dogg is at the helm.

In late 2015, with the help of media entrepreneur Ted Chung, the hip-hop star launched Merry Jane, an entertainment company that creates pot-centric editorial and videos extolling the positive benefits of cannabis. Other big-name partners on board include Seth Rogen, Guy Oseary and Miley Cyrus, who haven’t been shy about their love of pot.

For more, read L.A. Weekly’s full story about Snoop Dogg.

Mary Jane’s Medicinals is one of a few cannabis companies that offer "hash baths."Andrea Berry

Mary Jane’s Medicinals is one of a few cannabis companies that offer “hash baths.”

The night Dahlia Mertens first dropped some marijuana leaves in her bath was a revelation. “I couldn’t believe how relaxed it made me feel,” Mertens says. Soon after she created her signature “hash bath” mixture. “It’s essentially a big tea bag of cannabis mixed with lavender, chamomile and peppermint and some bath salts,” Mertens explains.

The “hash bath” is part of Mertens’ Colorado-based Mary Jane’s Medicinals topical product line, which she founded in 2010. Mertens currently works with a growing number of Los Angeles dispensaries that offer her non-psychoactive, marijuana-infused massage oil, lip balms, salve and bath products.

For more, read L.A. Weekly’s story about pot’s role at the spa.

ask_a_stonerWestword

Dear Stoner: Read your answer about smoking without the smell last week, but what can I do about removing the smell from my car? I don’t smoke in it, but it reeks every time I leave weed in there for more than thirty minutes.
TC

Dear TC: You don’t like the smell of skunky jet fuel after a long day? I suppose it can be quite a tease if you have a long drive ahead of you. Still, I’d love to have Durban Poison or Texas Hash Plant air fresheners — but that’s just me.

If you don’t want your friends, family, dates, Uber passengers, etc., smelling your stoner habits when they’re in your ride, throw your weed bottles in a Mason jar — and throw that jar in the trunk. Even if you were already keeping your stash locked in a childproof container, it’s still better to keep it in the back in case an overzealous cop pulls you over and notices it. (Think of it as an open container of beer.) If you’re too lazy to walk to your trunk, leave some fast food on the front seat for a half-hour or so. You could also smoke a cigarette, but I like the smell of french fries more.

KIND Financial's CEO, David Dinenberg, at the company's headquarters in HollywoodDan Smarg

KIND Financial’s CEO, David Dinenberg, at the company’s headquarters in Hollywood

When KIND Financial began in 2014, it was supposed to be the Wells Fargo for weed growers and dispensaries.

“I was initially going to be KIND Banking,” CEO David Dinenberg says. “I was going to be the marijuana bank.”

He says the idea struck when he was watching a 60 Minutes segment on marijuana businesses, which mentioned that the industry had no banking, credit cards or financial services. “If you had sneezed or coughed during the 15 seconds that this information was presented, you’d have missed it,” the impeccably dressed Dinenberg says, sitting in an airy conference room of his Hollywood office. Soon thereafter, he began learning about the cannabis industry. “The research evolved into a business plan,” he says. “I gravitate toward a problem and not the story.”

To learn more, read L.A. Weekly‘s full story about KIND Financial.

Thinkstock

How important is pot to Colorado tourism? “It is the elephant in the room,” said Cathy Ritter, the new state tourism head, who moved here from Illinois, shortly after she started in January. “Everyone does want to know about the impact of marijuana in Colorado.”

Author Mindy Sink wrote her first Moon Denver guide back in 2008, when the green rush to Colorado was just beginning. The third edition came out last month, and the fact that Moon Denverhas expanded to include Boulder, Colorado Springs and Fort Collins isn’t the only new twist. The subjects covered have expanded, too, with dispensaries added to the more standard tourist recommendations for sights, restaurants, nightlife and accommodations. That makes it the “first general-interest travel guide to be published with marijuana tourism included,” according to the publisher, Avalon Travel.