marijuana adsElizabeth D'Amico

Marijuana advertising works on kids whether they’re the intended audience or not, a new study maintains.

According to “Planting the Seeds of Marijuana Use,” assembled under the auspices of Elizabeth D’Amico, a licensed clinical psychologist and senior behavioral scientist with the RAND Corporation, the more medical cannabis ads an adolescent sees, the more likely he or she is to use or express an interest in consuming the substance and to view it in a positive light.

cannabis advocateBrandon Marshall

Most people thought the fight was over when Colorado voters legalized commercial cannabis in 2012, but that victory led to a series of smaller battles over such issues as social consumption, home-grow limitations and industry expansion. Proposals continue to pop up on both the local and state level that could advance or limit your rights as a cannabis consumer, patient, grower or business owner. Want to make sure things go in the right direction? Here’s how to become a cannabis advocate:

donald.trump.bongWestword photo-illustration

Of the 33 state legislators from Colorado who signed a recent letter to U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions calling for congressional action “to protect the sovereignty of states like Colorado and ensure that marijuana businesses and consumers will be free from undue federal interference,” none were Republicans.

Given that Republican U.S. Senator Cory Gardner was among the document’s original signatories and is currently working with the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, aka NORML, to prepare legislation on the subject, the reticence of GOP state reps and senators seems surprising. But while Republican state senator Tim Neville says he agrees with the letter’s ultimate goal, he doesn’t see the need for such a measure.

colorado dispensary Jacqueline Collins

As expected, Colorado’s legal marijuana revenue rose from February to March, according to the Colorado Department of Revenue, with one of the sharpest monthly increases seen yet. After seeing the lowest overall revenue in a year in February, pot sales set a record for retail earnings the next month, bringing in nearly $106 million to top the previous record of $101.5 million in August 2017.

img_4445_1_Courtesy of Athletes for Care

Ryan Kingsbury admits that he used to be that guy yelling at the TV during a football game, complaining that professional athletes were underperforming or overpaid. But after befriending a few of them and noticing a pattern of anxiety, depression and even suicidal thoughts once they left the game, he became familiar with the lonely corners in which former athletes sometimes find themselves.

“It’s much darker and uglier than we as a society want to admit,” Kingsbury says. “We [like to]cheer for them and root for them when they’re on the field — and then we couldn’t give two shits for them when they’re not.”

allister-6521Thomas Mitchell | Toke of the Town

Trail Blazers is a series of portraits by photographer Maria Levitov, spotlighting cannabis consumers from all walks of life.

Allister Auguste started experimenting with cannabis at a young age. A child of separated parents, he started smoking pot early and hasn’t stopped. Despite the daily habit, Auguste earned an academic scholarship to the Indiana Institute of Technology, and continues to use the plant as he finds meaning.

colorado.legalization.of.marijuana.police.images.800PoliceFoundation.org

Even as the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws, or NORML, is working with the office of Colorado Senator Cory Gardner to craft legislation designed to protect states that have legalized cannabis sales from federal interference, the organization is making a new push to have marijuana removed from the Controlled Substances Act, a process known as de-scheduling.

Exhibit A: In recent weeks, NORML submitted over 10,000 written requests that marijuana be de-scheduled to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which had asked for comments in conjunction with a review of cannabis’s international classification currently being conducted by the World Health Organization.

grinder-joint-rolling-joints-women-grow-collins-2.6.18Jacqueline Collins

An undercover study conducted by Denver Health found that a majority of Colorado dispensary employees — 69 percent — recommended that a pregnant woman use cannabis, Denver Health officials revealed today, May 9.

Researchers had two women conduct “mystery caller” phone conversations with employees at 400 dispensaries across the state, telling them that they were eight weeks pregnant and suffering from morning sickness. During the majority of those calls, the employees recommended the women use cannabis products.

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