sklar brothersTroy Conrad

Unless you’re a knowledgable comedy fan or watched a lot of Cheap Seatson ESPN Classic during the early 2000s, you may not recognize the Sklar brothers by name. But their faces and voices are a different story. The hilarious twins have made audiences around the country laugh with their unique, harmonious act while appearing in shows like Entourage, Better Call Saul and Curb Your Enthusiasm. Now, they’re showing off their stuff in an audio documentary.

In their new special on Audible, Sklars and Stripes, Randy and Jason Sklar visit ten different cities on tour with the help of HQ Trivia’s Scott Rogowsky, recording standup bits and traveling experiences along the way. The six-hour special includes more than forty minutes in Denver and Boulder, where the Sklars visited local landmarks like Casa Bonita, Comedy Works and Ballpark Holistic Dispensary.

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Hot on the heels of a groundbreaking lawsuit over Salmonella-tainted kratom that targeted a Colorado Springs store, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment has announced the recall of assorted products made from the popular but controversial pain-relieving herb. But while the ostensible reason for the recall involves the fear of Salmonella contamination, the CDPHE acknowledges that no illnesses have been reported in connection with the lot numbers in question, and the Food and Drug Administration statement highlighted in the CDPHE announcement focuses on the dangers of kratom in general, suggesting the possibility that broader seizures of the product might be in the offing.

Colorado wound up in the center of the kratom story last October, when the Denver Department of Public Health and Environment prohibited its sale for human consumption. A few months later, the federal Centers for Disease Control and the FDA warned about a “multi-state outbreak of Salmonella infections” that had sickened 28 people across twenty states nationwide.

marijuana fake newsWestword file photo

Last August, when veteran reporter Peter Marcus announced that he was leaving the ambitious ColoradoPolitics.com project he’d helped launch the previous year in favor of a communications-director position with the rapidly growing marijuana dispensary chain Terrapin Care Station, he stressed that he wasn’t leaving journalism behind, and that he planned to start a website that would mix original stories with posts intended to counter misinformation being spewed by pot enemies.

That site, TheNewsStation.com, is now live, and included among offerings that Marcus says “promote the positive business and economic impact of the cannabis industry” is a section in which he tears apart what he sees as marijuana “fake news.”

Herbert Fuego

Ahh, Opening Day in Denver. A land of happy drunks who are more excited to watch a good sunset than a good baseball team. Nothing against Nolan, Charlie and the boys on Blake Street, but this city will always be known more for Broncos, craft beer and blunts than peanuts and Cracker Jack. But who says they can’t all get along?

Baseball is increasingly being passed over for basketball, soccer and dadgum video games by younger generations. These young shitheads wouldn’t know a sac-fly from a sac-bunt, but tell them you have a sack of chronic, and they might be game to learn. To get your younger, woke friends (but still over 21) to shut the fuck up and enjoy the dusty, robotic classic that is baseball, give them a puff of one of these strains I’ve recently reviewed. They all hit for power.

autism for mmjJake Holschuh

Advocates pushing to include autism spectrum disorder in Colorado’s list of conditions that qualify for medical marijuana took a small but victorious step forward last night, April 5. But those who supported adding acute pain to the list weren’t as successful.

After over five hours of public testimony and deliberation, a House committee voted in favor of a bill that would add ASD to the state’s list of conditions treatable by medical marijuana. Introduced by Representative Edie Hooton, HB 1263 will now go in front of the entire House for consideration.

Jacqueline Collins

Cannabis enthusiasts aren’t top of mind when people think about scholarly go-getters, but the American Chemical Society doesn’t buy the stereotype. The nonprofit organization, which turns 141 years old today, April 6, founded its Cannabis Chemistry Subdivision in 2015. Now, it wants more brains to get in the mix.

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