full melt hashWilliam Breathes

As the author of Cannabis for Chronic Pain, Boulder-based Dr. Rav Ivker is among the country’s best-known and most respected advocates on behalf of medical marijuana. But he’s wary about weed consumption in a number of circumstances, warns that pot addiction is real, and is so against the consumption of powerful concentrates that he supports banning them.

marijuana.billboard.pesky.hangoverPhoto courtesy of the RAND Corporation

The National Association of Cannabis Businesses’ draft guidelines to establish a country-wide advertising standard for the marijuana industry was the subject of a months-long comment period and is expected to be finalized this summer. Doug Fischer, chief legal officer for the NACB, believes such a criterion is needed as soon as possible, even though cannabis remains illegal on a federal level.

In his words, “The time to do this is now.”

flr_nr_ww_s_s_5Courtesy of Native Roots

Although most of us think of marijuana as just a plant, it’s actually sold in many different varieties, including flower and extracted concentrates for smoking or vaping, edibles, drinks, lotions and a myriad of other infused products.

The companies that grow the plant and produce these products are strictly regulated, however, and must track every step of the process. So what all goes into this seed-to-sale system? We asked Native Roots, Colorado’s largest dispensary chain, to show us.

sour tangieHerbert Fuego

Summer in Denver is lovely — not too hot and not too humid — but we can still have bad days. An extended period of high temperatures with no rain or cloud coverage might force those of us with no air conditioning out of the house; fortunately, Denver is surrounded by beautiful parks and trails.

If used moderately, cannabis can be both a motivation and a reward for hikes, bike rides, fishing, runs or even simple walks through the park. Some of us need a jolt and want a sativa to pump up before scaling a fourteener, while others already run too hot and require a hybrid or indica to cool down. Here are ten recently reviewed strains that can do a little of both.

Jacqueline Collins

What a difference four years makes. In 2014, Oklahoma and Nebraska were suing Colorado in federal court for this state’s decision to legalize recreational marijuana, but now the Sooner State is starting to catch up to Colorado’s affinity for the plant — and in some cases, even surpass it.

On Tuesday, June 26, voters approved Question 788, making Oklahoma the thirtieth state in the country to legalize marijuana for medical purposes. The measure passed with 57 percent approval, and is being lauded by MMJ advocates for its broad-reaching nature. Unlike the large majority of states with MMJ programs (including Colorado), Oklahoma would allow doctors to prescribe marijuana for any condition they see fit.

citrus sapThomas Mitchell | Toke of the Town

The cannabis qualities that we’ve grown to love don’t always make a good first impression. The skunky smells and earthy flavors of Diesels and Kushes take time to understand, much less covet. And I have yet to appreciate one popular characteristic of “good” weed: sticky buds. Anyone who’s ever rolled a joint, let alone trimmed a harvest, knows how sticky pot can get (don’t even think about rubbing your hands around your eyes afterward), so a strain called Citrus Sap sounded like too much for my fingers to bear.

 

420_civic_center_den_april202017_64_of_66_Brandon Marshall

Using cannabis isn’t considered much of an environmental danger, but there are still ways we can improve consumption as legalization becomes more mainstream. As reports of illegal cannabis grows in national parks harming the environment and the legal industry’s thirst for renewable energy continue to surface, it’s becoming clear that both consumers and cannabis-industry reps will have to push together for better environmental stoner habits.

To help make sure your cannabis carbon footprint is nothing more than the smoke you’re blowing in the air, here are five ways to be a more eco-friendly stoner.

420 gamesNick Maahs

Former NFL running back Reuben Droughns spent eight years avoiding tackles from some of the strongest, meanest men in sports. But on Saturday, June 25, hits were exactly what he was looking for. “We are here to win,” he said to his teammates before playing kickball at the 4/20 Games. “And after that, smoke a couple joints!”

The 4/20 Games at Infinity Park, an annual event to raise money and awareness for cannabis-infused healthy living, were in full swing by mid-morning on Saturday. The event’s second go-round in Denver aimed to combat the plant’s stigma by promoting an active and healthy cannabis lifestyle, partnering with Athletes for Care, or A4C — a nonprofit simultaneously raising awareness about health issues faced by professional athletes, de-stigmatizing cannabis use and helping retired jocks transition into new lives.

anonymous-8468Maria Levitov

Trail Blazers is a series of portraits by photographer Maria Levitov spotlighting cannabis consumers from all walks of life.

Although cannabis is legally sold in Colorado, that doesn’t mean everyone can use it freely. Some people, whether because of their families, jobs or religions, still have to hide their pot consumption — but that doesn’t stop them from toking up. This young scientist, who uses cannabis to curb her anxiety, used the plant to help her calm down before one of the biggest days of her life: her wedding day.

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