champs_collins20170920_024Jacqueline Collins

Hospitalizations from vaping have slowed significantly since the fall, when the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention officially linked vitamin E acetate, a vaping additive used to dilute nicotine and marijuana oils, to the vast majority of the illnesses reported. Although most of those cases stemmed from black market products, vaping liquid sold at regulated marijuana dispensaries has also been connected to several illnesses, with some THC vaping oils sold by dispensaries testing positive for vitamin E.

According to one cannabis laboratory, though, vitamin E acetate is a naturally occurring substance in virtually all plant products we use, which is why vaping oil manufacturers that don’t add the substance to their products have seen it show up in their test results. To learn more about naturally occurring vitamin E, we caught up with Frank Taylor, co-founder of cannabis testing facility AgriScience Labs.

socialimpactKicco Koffie

Kicco Koffie officially launched at the end of 2019, but the new CBD coffee company already wants to add something to its brand: global entrepreneurship.

“Our goal was to create a product that could service a need,” says Kicco co-founder Vincent Sarlos. “And that service would be a healthy coffee that tasted really good and can teach entrepreneurship all over the world.”

studio_420_xmas_collins20191214_025 (1)Jacqueline Collins

The seventh year of recreational marijuana sales in Colorado promises to be an interesting one, with new laws allowing social consumption establishments and weed delivery, as well as new industry rules mandating more product testing while restricting vaping ingredients.

Here are the six biggest rule changes that will take effect on Colorado’s marijuana landscape in 2020.

cbddog (1)Thomas Mitchell | Toke of the Town

About six months ago, a Reddit user posted a photo of a sign pretending to peddle fake CBD-infused firewood. The Internet reacted as you’d expect, shaking a collective fist and rabble-rousing over something that was clearly intended as funny commentary concerning exactly what the Reddit readers thought they were mad about: CBD is being used and abused.

Even if the Internet’s anger was misplaced (big surprise) and we haven’t reached the point of CBD-infused firewood yet — that we know of — there’s no dearth of dumb cash grabs by companies slapping some CBD on it. Earlier this year, we spotted a hot dog stand (at the Cherry Creek Arts Festival, of all places) advertising franks infused with 5 milligrams of the stuff. Carl’s Jr. did something similar as a 4/20 stunt in Denver, adding a whopping 4.2 milligrams into a special sauce for a special burger.

opener_hempJay Vollmar

Eric Jensen feels trapped. By now, the 43-year-old thought he’d be able to travel from his home in southeastern Colorado to see his son play college ball in the Midwest. But instead, he can’t cross the border into Kansas. He’s stuck hanging around his home town, where most of the residents have turned their backs on him, believing that he’s a hardened drug dealer. Instead, he’s facing criminal charges for something that’s completely legal in Colorado: hemp.

Eric and his brother, 39-year-old Ryan Jensen, grew up in the town of Holly, ten miles from the Kansas border. Early on, they started working on the family farm, the fourth generation to do so, and by 2007, they’d taken over for their father, Robert. They grew wheat and corn and onions and cabbage, which was harvested and shipped to grocery stores across the country. But their biggest crop was cantaloupe.

the_green_solution_collins20171215_008 (3)Jacqueline Collins

Colorado has somehow managed to survive six years of recreational cannabis sales without burning down. But even so, there were plenty of hot, skunky issues to cover in 2019.

This year, the Colorado Legislature further established this state as an epicenter of cannabis, passing laws that expanded medical marijuana access and legalized social use businesses, such as pot cafes and smoking lounges. The state also continued in its role as a guinea pig of regulation and cannabis culture, dealing with challenges ranging from moldy pot to equitable industry participation.

After trimming our way through the year’s stories, we landed on these as the ten biggest in 2019:

stoner (8)Westword

As America’s knowledge about the plant grows, the range of subjects our Stoner handles have expanded. While most of the questions we received in previous years asked such things as how to roll a joint or if it’s possible to boof marijuana (it is, but be careful), 2019 queries ventured into slightly more intellectual subjects, such as the recent vaping health crisis, or what the point of useless “indica” and “sativa” designations really is.

As we enter a new year full of unknown and new mysteries, here are five of our most interesting and popular Ask a Stoner questions in 2019.

den_011217_veritas_grow_slentz006 (1)Scott Lentz

Remember 2012? Peyton Manning had started his first season with the Broncos, and none of us knew jack about CBD. Seven years later, most of us still know jack about CBD, but at least we recognize how ignorant we are about that and other cannabis compounds.

The letters CBC, CBG and CBN probably look like acronyms for Canadian broadcasting entities to anyone outside of scientists and pot nerds, but they’re actually lesser-known molecular fruits of the cannabis plant. And with hemp’s recent legalization, we’re hearing a lot more about these “new” cannabinoids and their medical and wellness potential. We recently caught up with scientist and former hemp grower Devin Alvarez, CEO of CBD company Straight Hemp, to learn more about this alphabet soup of cannabis.

hemlockHerbert Fuego

We all have weird personal connections to certain words that cause us to hate them. I’m not talking about squirming when you hear “moist,” but about opinions that date from childhood, like my dislike for “hemlock.” Even before I knew the word’s definition, hemlock sounded like some fatal coughing disease from the 1600s, or a foreboding local swamp in which Timmy Flanagan drowned.

I wasn’t terribly off: Hemlock is a poisonous plant, notorious for being brewed into tea that was used to execute Socrates. It’s also the name of a shitty horror show on Netflix, the first (and last) heavy-metal band I saw live, and a popular weed strain in Colorado. As a result, my relationship with “hemlock” has gone from blocked to online lurking through dispensary menus.

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