img_2508Nina Petrovic

Cannabis continues to gain influence, not only in new business ventures, but in college education, too. Just take a peak inside professor Paul Seaborn’s Business of Marijuana course, where students at the Daniels College of Business at the University of Denver took part in a potrepreneur pitch competition June 4.

Five teams of undergraduate and graduate DU students proposed new business ideas to a panel of cannabis industry judges comprised of Julie Berliner, founder and CEO of edible company Sweet Grass Kitchen, Mark Grindeland, CEO and co-founder of Coda Signature edibles and Carter Davidson, an executive at Vangst recruiting and staffing.

tetra_lounge_glitter_bong_collins2018 (1)Jacqueline Collins

The conversations around social equity in the Colorado cannabis industry may have started late, but a new category of business licenses could help expand diversity in this state’s pot industry.

When Governor Jared Polis signed Senate Bill 224 last month, he approved a long list of updated cannabis-industry regulations. Among SB 224’s many changes to the commercial pot industry was its creation of accelerator business licenses, reserved for people from low-income areas of Colorado who want to start their own cannabis business but don’t have industry connections or access to funding. Known as micro licenses around the industry, they would allow startup businesses to use the facilities of established pot companies as they research and create their own cannabis products, which they would completely own.

lilac_dieselHerbert Fuego

Just about every time I get cocky enough to assume I can guess a strain’s effects based on its name, I always get brought back down to earth — or shot out to space, depending on the strain. But a Diesel had never done me wrong…until I got seduced by a bouquet of lilacs.

Aromatically alluring and extremely dangerous, Lilac Diesel is a sedative cross of several strains, including Citral Glue, Forbidden Fruit, New York City Diesel, Cherry Pie and Super Lemon Haze. The combination results in an intoxicating odor that somehow showcases a slice of each parent strain. Sweet, tropical notes of berries and fruit as well as sour, rubbery hints of gas are blanketed by calming yet zesty floral notes of lavender — or lilac, if you really want to go there.

04202018_bruce_polis_420_0040 (1)Kenzie Bruce

With a few strokes of his pen, Governor Jared Polis ushered in the most change to Colorado’s marijuana landscape in a single day since voters approved recreational pot in 2012.

Inside a sweaty, packed governor’s office at the Capitol on Wednesday, May 29, Polis approved bills that legalized social marijuana consumption, commercial delivery and opened the state’s pot industry up to public investors, as well as measures that significantly overhauled and expanded both the medical and recreational marijuana sectors.

michael-25100-trailblazer-levitov-2019 (1)Maria Levitov

Colorado has some music venues that are notorious for ignoring cannabis use, but most of those places aren’t booking classical music. Groupmuse, a network of event organizers and musicians, has been setting up small and large classical music shows in both private homes and public venues across the country for over five years, but now it wants to expand accessibility. So last month, Groupmuse began hosting cannabis-friendly shindigs, or “groupmuses,” in Boulder and Denver, setting up private parties with local musicians so that attendees could enjoy their tunes at a new, higher level.

We caught up with Groupmuse founder Sam Bodkin to learn more about these new, intimate music sessions, and how consuming cannabis can further connect both listeners and performers to the classical canon.

img-0727 (1)Thomas Mitchell | Toke of the Town

Marijuana cafes, lounges, dispensary tasting rooms and other social-use businesses will soon be legal in Colorado, now that Governor Jared Polis has signed a bill that regulates social pot consumption.

“Colorado has many tourists and residents who choose to participate [in legal cannabis use]. Up until this bill, there’s been no way to have safe public consumption,” Polis said before signing the bill on May 29. “I’ve smelled it walking my dog. For many of us with kids, we want to make sure we don’t have that in our neighborhoods.”

420-fest-marijuana-smokeJacqueline Collins

Are stoners lazy? Not according to a recent University of Colorado Boulder study that questions the “lazy stoner” stereotype. Overseen by Angela Bryan, a professor in CU Boulder’s Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, as well as the Institute for Cognitive Science, the study looked at a possible link between cannabis use and exercise behaviors.

“If we think about the typical ways you think of cannabis, it’s making you more relaxed and maybe not as motivated to get out of the house, and as an exercise researcher, that’s concerning,” says Bryan. “On the other hand, there’s some really good longitudinal data that shows that long-term cannabis users have lower weight, lower risk of diabetes, better waist-to-hip ratio, and better insulin function. It’s kind of a scientific quandary, so we thought we should do investigations to see whether there really is a problem that might be happening, or if cannabis could even be a benefit to physical activity.”

jason-dunn-us-attorney-mitchell-2019 (1)Thomas Mitchell | Toke of the Town

Colorado law enforcement officers, district attorneys and federal authorities collaborated on what they describe as the largest collective marijuana bust in the state’s history.

During a press conference on May 24, Jason Dunn, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Colorado, discussed the two-year investigation that included nearly 250 location searches in eight counties across the state and led to 42 arrests after raids over the last three days.

20180918_leiffa-lab-arcpress-22 (1)Courtesy of Leiffa/Hillary Rowe

After medical marijuana was legalized in California over two decades ago, the technology behind cannabis consumption started taking off, and it’s truly exploded since 2014, when Colorado became the first state to legalize the plant for recreational purposes. The innovations took the industry from older, water-based extractions, like bubble hash, to advanced methods using solvents such as butane and CO2 to create wax and shatter.

But hash makers didn’t stop there. They soon figured out that freezing cannabis flower immediately after harvest preserves terpenes and plant oils before extraction, leading to the rise in “live” concentrates, like live resin. The newer, stankier product became the preferred dab for connoisseurs, further pushing back solventless and water-based extraction. But the progression of cannabis concentrates continues at a quick pace as newer extraction methods using rounds of ice-water extraction, heat and pressure produce concentrates that easily stack up with their solvent counterparts.

Cannabis extraction companies like Leiffa produce rosin and ice-water hash that looks, smells, tastes and lifts us to the moon like more traditional concentrates — and with the peace of mind that comes from knowing that no butane or ethanol stuck around. Although Leiffa’s Lakewood dispensary is only for medical marijuana patients, the brand’s wholesale concentrates are a growing and popular presence in recreational stores around Colorado.

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