Search Results: 2012/ (1135)

Rick Scott can’t stop thinking about pee.

A federal judge told him to drop the plan. The 11th Circuit Court of Appeals told him it was illegal. Then the U.S. Supreme Court refused to listen to his arguments. Even the facts are against him (the program wastes more money than it would ever “save”).
But despite losing over and over in every court around, Gov. Rick Scott is still fighting for the right to force state employees to pee in a cup. And the legal bills for his quixotic quest are now inching toward a cool million bucks — funded, of course, by taxpayers.

“Who’s got the lighter?! Let’s spark the fire!”

There are states with medical and recreational marijuana laws on the books where a person can adhere to all of their specific state laws, pay all applicable local tax and licensing fees, and conduct a safe and honest business in the cannabis industry. But, in many cases, they still cannot get a company credit card with which to conduct the day-to-day merchant services that are essential to any type of business.
So it is pretty interesting to see singer Gwen Stefani, no stranger to some weed, featured in a new MasterCard television ad. It is even more interesting when you hear the song that MasterCard marketing execs chose to represent their multibillion dollar brand.

Massachusetts U.S, Attorney Carmen Ortiz says her office is debating whether or not to weigh in on how close Massachusetts dispensaries can be to schools and considering shutting down shops within 1,000 feet of schools, playgrounds our housing.
According to the Boston Globe, six of the 15 dispensary proposals given initial go-ahead from state officials would fall within the 1,000 feet radius.

By allowing Colorado, Washington, Alaska, Oregon and Washington D.C. voters to legalize limited amounts of cannabis for personal use, the United States has violated United Nations conventions. That’s the gripe from the head of the U.N. director of the Office on Drugs and Crime, Yury Fedotov, who says he plans to take official actions.
“I don’t see how (the new laws) can be compatible with existing conventions,” Fedotov told reporters this week.

INCB.org
Wayne Hall.


Professor Wayne Hall dislikes drugs. So much so, he advises the World Health Organization on drug issues and teaches “addiction policy” at the King’s College in London. According to Hall, he’s gone through 20 years of research and can show that marijuana leads to mental illness, sick babies and car crashes.
His findings are based on government-funded (anti-cannabis) reports from the last 20 years that he hand-selected. Basically, he’s parroting other, old reports and passing it off as something new.

The president of the Louisiana State Fair got a ticket and a ride from local police


Every fall in Shreveport, folks travel from far and wide to attend the annual Louisiana State Fair. Besides the carnival games, rickety rides, and overripe port-a-potties, fair-goers to this southern affair can drop their hard-earned dollars on such heart-stopping treats as bacon-covered caramel apples and deep fried watermelons. Not only is this carb-filled-cardiac-arrest-inducing fair food totally legal, it is one of the main attractions.
Chris Giordano runs the Louisiana State Fair, and he says, “Every year we bring new foods and try to mix things up with the attractions and rides to keep the fair fresh for everybody and I think it’s something that some people look forward to all year long.”
Giordano, 43, was arrested this past Saturday and was promptly taken to jail when local cops busted him with pot in his car after pulling him over to ticket him for rolling through a stop sign.


The Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment isn’t known as the biggest booster of medical marijuana. Nonetheless, the CDPHE has been tasked by the state legislature with overseeing $10 million worth of grants intended to fund “objective scientific research regarding the efficacy of marijuana and its component parts as part of medical treatment.”


As summer break winds to an end, and another school year begins, many unsuspecting 5th graders and junior high students across the country will get their first introduction to drugs. No, it won’t be on the playground or the back of the bus, but as a part of their classroom curriculum, as the Drug Abuse Resistance Education program (DARE) kicks off its 31st year in existence.
Over three decades of War on Drugs propaganda comes at a cost, however. “Just Say No” coloring books and foil badge stickers ain’t free you know! With schools in disrepair, teachers being laid off, and art, music, and extra-curricular activities being defunded, many schools are deciding that their books may be more easily balanced without DARE in the budget.

Commons/Iris Ventura Crosby.
A baby nursing, from WikiMedia Commons.


Despite the overwhelming evidence to suggest that breastfeeding a baby within the first few days of life greatly improve their health over time, a hospital in Portland, Oregon refused to allow Crystal Cain to nurse her premature newborn.
Their reason? She used medical cannabis occasionally during her pregnancy as a natural alternative to pharmaceutical drugs to help deal with her nausea and anxiety at the suggestion of her midwife.

FlickrCommons/stockmonkeys.com


Behavioral Health Services of Pickens County, South Carolina is the location of the latest in a growing list of regional centers receiving federal funding to study cannabis. They are actively seeking local marijuana users who are interested in being compensated for their time in exchange for participating in their research.
Perhaps it should be clarified, these studies only have one purpose in mind, and that is to discover and patent a pill-poppable form of relief from cannabis addiction. Let’s keep it real, many people still love the herb, but for any number of reasons may have a need to cut back for a while, or to put it away altogether.

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