Search Results: money/ (13)

Irvin Rosenfeld
Irv Rosenfeld, a 58-year-old stockbroker from Fort Lauderdale, Florida, doesn’t look like a record-setting pothead. But he’s smoked more than 120,000 U.S. government joints since 1982.

​On November 20, 1982, the United States federal government sent a Florida citizen 300 cannabis cigarettes in a shiny tin can. 
The U.S. government, known the world over as a champion of preying on the sick with a weapon they call the “War On Drugs,” continues to send that same man the same ration of joints 29 years later.
This delivery of medicine is part of a “Compassionate Investigative New Drug” Program that exists to study “new drugs”, in this case, marijuana.
Over that 29-year period the government has performed no such study.
Irvin Rosenfeld of Florida will begin his 30th year of smoking cannabis cigarettes on November 20, 2011 — and he feels great.

Robin Twomey
Irv Rosenfeld has received 300 joints a month from the U.S. federal government for 29 years.

​The federal government of the United States has been telling its citizens for years that marijuana has no medical value. And the federal government is lying — according to the federal government.

It’s enough to make your head explode, but that’s the way things are in Drug War America. A handful of seriously ill patients have received free medical marijuana from the U.S. federal government for almost 30 years, even as that same government says cannabis is a Schedule I drug with a high potential for abuse and no known medicinal applications.
The existence of Irvin Rosenfeld and the other three surviving federal medical marijuana patients in the U.S. puts the lie to the official government position. These patients are part of the Compassionate Investigative New Drug program, which unfortunately hasn’t accepted any new enrollees since the first Bush Administration, due to political pressure.
Portsmouth, Virginia native Rosenfeld, who now lives in Florida, has been smoking 10 to 12 joints of marijuana every day for more than 28 years — a grand total of more than 123,000 joints. But rather than adopting the attitude of “I got mine” and being afraid to speak out for the rights of other patients, Irv — who uses marijuana to treat severe bone disorder called multiple congenital cartilaginous exostosis — has bravely chosen the path of public advocacy.

Graphic: Adam Vieyra/SD City Beat
The future of marijuana retailing in America? We hope not.

​By Jack Rikess

Toke of the Town

Northern California Correspondent
It is 8:05, Pacific Standard Time and the TV is rehashing the morning news. I’ve already boogie-boarded the Net for the past couple of hours reading the wires, the tubes, The Times; NY and LA, the blogs and of course the RSS feeds I have from all cannabis-related well-springs.
While the real news should be all about what’s happening in the Mideast (over there) or the Midwest (over here), but as of a minute ago, some guy in New York on Good Morning, America has just pulled out this tease before going to commercial. “Up next, the Wal-Mart of Weed, to open today in Sacramento, California.”