Search Results: patients/ (17)

UMMP

​​James Shaw, director of the Los Angeles-based Union of Medical Marijuana patients, on Tuesday announced an alternative to a ban on nearly 400 local medicinal cannabis dispensaries which was proposed by City Councilman Jose Huizar last month.

“Councilman Huizar seems unaware that there is a reasonable way to regulate medical cannabis patient associations now using technology which we have developed in conjunction with AgSite Secure,” Shaw said.
If that sounds like Shaw is selling something, yes he is; however, keep an open mind, because third-party verification may be a way out of the conundrum in which California dispensaries find themselves.
According to Shaw, the recent Second Court of Appeals decision cited by the Councilman, known as Pack v. Long Beach, which rejected the ability of cities to issue paid permits to authorize dispensaries, did not mean a ban was the only alternative to a complete lack of regulation.

Legal Medical Marijuana States
The tax rate on that marijuana goes from 5 percent to 7 percent as soon as it’s poured in the brownie mix.

​How patients use their medical marijuana affects their tax rate, according to a recent opinion from Maine Revenue Services — and choosing the healthy option of smokeless edibles will result in higher taxes.

After Maine residents approved medical marijuana, lawmakers decided pot sold for medicinal purposes would be subject to the five percent sales tax. But now MRS has issued an opinion that prepared foods such as brownies that include cannabis will be taxed at a higher, seven percent rate, reports Mal Leary of Capitol News Service.
Many patients, advocates and others question the logic — and the legality — of the odd ruling.

RIPAC

​Medical marijuana advocates are calling on Rhode Island Governor Lincoln Chafee to open cannabis dispensaries allowed under state law. The governor blocked opening of the shops due to the threat of federal prosecution after receiving one of the threatening letters recently sent by U.S. Attorneys in medical marijuana states.

A Statehouse protest is planned for Tuesday by the Rhode Island Patient Advocacy Coalition (RIPAC) to urge Governor Chafee to allow three dispensaries to open, reports The Associated Press.
The state selected three shops to dispense cannabis under Rhode Island’s medical marijuana law. Chafee last spring suspended the plans to open the shops after federal prosecutors warned that dispensary personnel could face prosecution for violating federal marijuana laws.

Graphic: Nick Stokes Design/Willamette Week

​Tenants of two public-housing agencies in Oregon have been told they cannot smoke medical marijuana in their apartments and houses.

The warnings have drawn a line for the first time as the federal government continues to apply pressure against medical marijuana in Oregon, reports Corey Paul at Willamette Week.
The public-housing agencies involved in the warnings are REACH Community Development and Home Forward, formerly known as the Housing Authority of Portland.

Photo: Cancer Cure
A new medical cannabis section has been added to the government’s National Cancer Institute website.

​Welcome to Room 420, where your instructor is Mr. Ron Marczyk and your subjects are wellness, disease prevention, self actualization, and chillin’.


Worth Repeating
By Ron Marczyk, R.N.
Health Education Teacher (Retired)

What happened? A new medical cannabis section was added to the official National Cancer Institute website at www.cancer.gov on March 17.

Could this new development be used as a defense in any pending medical marijuana arrest cases, or for the defense of any medical cannabis care center threatened with closure?

Graphic: Secrets Of Vancouver

​Can marijuana actually make you smarter? Well, yeah, probably so, man. But if you’re bipolar, you now have some actual scientific research to back you up in that belief.

A recent study suggests that some patients with bipolar disorder who use marijuana actually performed better on certain tests involving cognitive functioning, reports Jessica Ward Jones, M.D., at PsychCentral.
Dr. Ole Andreassen of Oslo University Hospital in Norway studied 133 patients with bipolar disorder and 140 with schizophrenia. The patients were questioned about prior drug use; over the previous six months, 18 bipolar patients and 23 schizophrenia patients had used marijuana.
All of the participants then underwent several tests to assess neurocognitive function, including the logical memory test, the color-word interference set-shifting subset test, the digit span forward test, the verbal fluency test, and learning tests.

Graphic: TopNews

​It was an open and shut case — or at least, the police in a northern California town thought so when they confiscated more than two pounds of marijuana from a couple’s home, even though doctors authorized the pair to use cannabis for medical purposes.

San Francisco police evidently thought the same with a father and son they suspected of using the state’s medical marijuana law to operate what the cops claimed was an illegal trafficking organization, reports KTVQ.
But both those cases, along with possibly dozens of others, were tossed out in recent weeks because of a California Supreme Court ruling that struck down a seven-year-old state law that put an eight-ounce limit on the amount of marijuana that medical users are allowed to possess.