Search Results: activists (424)

Convention-goers and Philadelphia residents witnessed two 51-foot inflatable¬†joints being marched up Broad Street yesterday in celebration of the Democratic National Committee’s progressive platform on marijuana.

The Philadelphia branch of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws and DCMJ, the outfit that helped legalize marijuana in Washington., D.C., organized a group of about two dozen members to carry the blow-up joints about 3.5 miles from Philadelphia City Hall to the Wells Fargo Center, where the convention is being held.

The Missouri marijuana-legalization activists who filed an initiative petition to get legal weed on the 2016 ballot are re-filing their paperwork after the secretary of state’s office rejected it for minor form issues. So if you were looking to comment on or sign the petition, you’ll have to wait a little longer.
Before a new ballot initiative is approved by the secretary of state’s office, the attorney general takes a look-see to make sure the language conforms to legal style, which can be tricky. After KC NORML submitted its proposal to regulate marijuana like food — meaning no age restrictions, no DUI risk, no taxes for medical product — the attorney general’s office rejected it for minor style issues, including incorrect underlining and brackets.

Our sister paper, The Denver Westword, had a post earlier this week about a Denver Police Department campaign focusing on trick-or-treaters and the possibility they might be given pot edibles for Halloween sparked fresh accusations of fear-mongering. But this reader suggests that something like this could actually happen — although not for the reasons hyped by the DPD.

Colorado Supreme Court chambers.


The Colorado Supreme Court will hear arguments tomorrow on whether or not employers should be able to fire employees for using cannabis off-work. The case stems from Brandon Coats, a former DISH Network phone operator who was fired from his job in 2010 after he failed a test for marijuana. Coates, who was left in a wheelchair for life after a car accident as a teen, says he only uses the cannabis off work and that his employer fired him inappropriately.
Colorado business officials and the state Attorney General’s office have come out in support of DISH’s decision, but a group of vocal Colorado advocates have jumped in on Coates’ side and are imploring the courts to decide for patients and not for big business interests.


Anti-pot activists have embraced a survey showing that the majority of Coloradans are unhappy with marijuana legalization even though other analyses find exactly the opposite. The latest poll to address this issue comes from Suffolk University. The results are synopsized like so: Colorado voters may be having second thoughts about the legalization of marijuana. A slight majority of voters (50.2 percent) say they do not agree with the decision to legalize recreational marijuana in that state — a decision made by voters in 2012 — while 46 percent continue to support the decision. Nearly 49 percent do not approve of how the state is managing legalized pot, compared to 42 percent who approve.
Approximately four seconds after these results were made public, the folks from Project SAM, a group that opposes cannabis legalization, weighed in.


A Colorado lawsuit filed this past June contends that special taxes placed on recreational marijuana sales are illegal and unconstitutional. Today, the group filing the lawsuit, No Over Taxation, has a hearing in the case. Cannabis advocates encouraging attendance contend that should the suit be successful, it could spell the end for marijuana licensing and registration regulations statewide.
Plaintiffs in the suit include marijuana activist Kathleen Chippi and Miguel Lopez, founder of the Denver 4/20 rally. Read the full breakdown as well as the official complaint at the Denver Westword.


A proposed law that would have established policing of marijuana dispensaries statewide was essentially killed in the California legislature last week.
Dale Gieringer, state coordinator of California NORML, says it’s now time to take the matter directly to voters. He envisions the possibility, in 2016, of an initiative that would ask you to approve both the legalization of recreational marijuana and the creation of a regulatory framework for all pot retailers. That could mean having the California Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control act as police for medical and recreational shops. More at the LA Weekly.

Bud Green.


A man who once told Wally George in his Anaheim TV studio that Nancy Reagan smoked pot is now telling a whopper on the East Coast: that he was the one who replaced American flags with bleached white versions of Old Glory.
The Reverend Bud Green of the People Opposing Tyranny Party (POT Party … get it?) makes the claim on his blog:

Ron Reiring/Flickr.
ABQNM.


Backers of a proposal that would make the maximum penalty for an ounce of marijuana a $25 fine in Albuquerque, New Mexico submitted signatures Monday hoping to get their proposal on the November ballot.
But even they admit it could be a long shot. Supporters turned in 16,000 signatures, hoping that 11,203 are actually valid. That seems like it would be a given, but verification of the first set of signatures showed that only 57 percent were valid.

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