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While the cannabis industry’s appetite for energy use is already widely documented, we’re still learning more about other forms of legal pot’s impact on the environment, such as packaging and extraction waste, as well as how growing nutrients affect soil.

One environmental factor we didn’t see coming? Terpenes.

Terpenes are molecules responsible for the smells and flavors of cannabis, hops, pine trees and every other plant aroma. As growers began to breed cannabis to achieve flavor profiles that taste more like oranges, grapes or pine than weed, terpenes quickly became all the rage in legal cannabis — to the point that they’re now extracted and mixed with THC concentrate for a more flavorful dab.

Legal marijuana’s place in college education is still limited, but it’s starting to pay off for some University of Denver graduates.

The university’s Sturm College of Law and its media and journalism programs have offered classes centered on legal weed since 2015, with the Daniels School of Business following suit in 2017. And now, alumni are beginning to make their marks on the nation’s burgeoning industry.

Driving around the residential streets of Colorado, you might see signs that look like they’re about to announce a garage sale but instead are advertising hemp or CBD oil. Like the homemade one pictured here, on Iliff Avenue in Aurora, hawking 1,444 milligrams of CBD oil for $60.

“There’s a lot of concern, or growing concern, as we see a lot of the CBD market grow and grow,” says Hollis Glenn, director of the Colorado Department of Agriculture’s inspection and consumer services. “You see CBD being sold in places like gas stations, and the industry is so new that there’s no directive on how it should be manufactured.”

On July 15, 2015, the Colorado Board of Health rejected a petition to add post-traumatic stress disorder as a medical marijuana condition, to the vocal dismay of a packed room of veterans and medical marijuana patients. Fast forward four years, and not only is PTSD now an approved medical condition, but the board is preparing to usher in one of the most expansive sets of MMJ rules that Colorado has seen in over a decade.

Curtis Powell and Rebecca Goss loved to venture out to infusion events (where cannabis is infused in food), but their options as vegans were extremely limited. So they decided to start their own dinner club, which they called Vegan Stoner Club.

The couple partnered with a close friend from Rob the Art Museum in June to start creating THC-infused dinners and pairings. “We want to spread veganism and cannabis in our own unique way,” Powell says.

Commercial marijuana products sold in Colorado may have to start undergoing heavy-metals testing as soon as 2019, according to the state Marijuana Enforcement Division.

Although not as intimidating as Slayer and Megadeath, heavy metals such as cadmium, arsenic and nickel can be harmful if inhaled, ingested or applied to the skin regularly. According to the National Institutes of Health, long-term exposure to heavy metals can lead to liver or kidney damage, abdominal pain, nausea and vomiting, diarrhea, heart abnormalities, a disrupted nervous system, anemia and more.

But what do heavy metals have to do with legal pot?

America’s history of being wrong-headed about cannabis is well-documented on a variety of platforms, but the funniest way to examine it today is on YouTube. Host to a wide range of entertaining lunacy, YouTube’s rabbit holes can lead down some weird paths, including flat-earth theories, ’80s hair metal or videos that end in some asshole yelling “WORLD STAR!”

One of my favorite dens of nostalgic stupidity is anti-marijuana commercials and public service announcements from yesteryear. While a few carry messages that make some sense, such as the dangers of youth use or smoking and driving, many of them carry the same Reefer Madness rhetoric we make fun of today. Don’t believe it? Check out these ten commercials and PSAs from past decades and see for yourself.

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