Search Results: books (216)

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Dope! That’s what comic books are! Dope! And those dirty books should be scrubbed, put through the wringer and have the dirt squeezed from them!
At least, that’s the gist of this December 30, 1948 column in the Steamboat (Colorado) Pilot by George Bowra, an (at the time) relatively well-known figure in the American West. The tone of the article is over the top, bordering on satire — which might make sense considering Bowra’s history as a colorful character. But we’re not so sure he was joking.

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The Sentence Salvo

​There are so many books relating, directly and indirectly, to the world of cannabis that it can be tough to know which ones to buy.

With a plethora of volumes on growing, using, concentrating, and cooking with cannabis, as well as tomes related to the culture and lifestyle associated with it, the reader with an adventurous streak can stock a library or fill an e-reader.
But beyond the grow books (I recommend Rosenthal, Cervantes and West) and the basic histories of marijuana (I recommend mine), books which are more about the (counter-) culture surrounding weed rather than weed itself are harder to pigeonhole and, thus, often harder to find.

Here are five of the best books on the culture of marijuana that came to our attention this year.
The Audacity of Dope by sports writer Monte Dutton is unusual in that Dutton has, until now, been well known and celebrated for his spin on NASCAR racing. Dutton’s controversial new novel features a man who becomes a hero against his own wishes.
Riley Mansfield, the lead character, isn’t a conventional hero. He writes songs for a living, smokes pot for recreation and basically just wants to live and let live. But when he foils an apparent terrorist plot he is thrust into the spotlight, which is exactly where he doesn’t want to be.
Suddenly, everyone wants a piece of the marketable new “hero,” including both major political parties. They aren’t willing to take no for an answer, partly because it’s an election year and partly because what happened on the plane may be more complicated than it appears.
Mansfield and his girl Friday, Melissa Franklin, lead the government and the Republicans on a sometimes merry, sometimes painful, sometimes lucky chase. Along the way, they stumble across some unlikely friends — a Democrat strategist, a Rolling Stone writer, a pair of sympathetic FBI agents — and also some ruthless enemies.
Theirs is a love affair of sex, drugs and country-folk set against a backdrop of political scheming, hidden agendas and an unraveling plan to keep control of the government.
The Audacity of Dope by Monte Dutton, Neverland Publishing Company LLC [2011], $16.95
strawberry dieselHerbert Fuego

I’ve accumulated a pile of at least twelve unread books over the past few years. I still intend to read them, but that stack is more likely to grow than shrink anytime soon. Japan has a word for lazy book collectors like me: tsundoku. That term very much applies to cannabis, as well. Dozens of strains have piqued my interest while I’ve been out shopping, only to be pushed down the queue by a sexier, stankier bud that catches my attention. Finally, though, after months of passing it over, I gave Strawberry Diesel a shot, and it made me wonder the same thing I thought after reading Friday Night Lights: What took me so long?

sour_ogHerbert Fuego

I’m not going to waste time complaining about my life — everyone has to eat shit sometimes, and my diet is relatively free from that substance — but the tidal wave of feces lapping on my shores last week broke records. Financial, medical and relationship issues all culminated in one massive dump, and just like that, I was officially over being an adult. I needed an age-cation.

Shopping for a strain to help me escape into a land of Nickelodeon cartoons, comic books and ice cream sandwiches for a weekend, I came upon Sour OG. A product of San Fernando Valley OG Kush (SFV OG) and Sour Diesel, Sour OG has been bypassed by Girl Scout Cookies as everyone’s favorite OG-sativa blend, but the fifty-fifty hybrid’s presence in Denver dispensaries should still be respected.

marijuana Stocking StuffersShutterstock.com/ElRoi

If there’s one part about Christmas that I don’t like, it’s the shopping. The mall might as well be one giant, burning dumpster during December, and you can count me as one of the flaming jamokes running around to each retailer in a hopeless quest to buy something other than golf balls and books for my parents. There is one small part of the shopping I do enjoy, though, and that’s filling the stockings.

Shopping for stocking stuffers doesn’t have to take you to the crowded stores and boutiques in Cherry Creek or downtown. You’ll make your brother’s day with a couple bags of beef jerky, some new toothbrushes and a Chik-fil-A gift card, all of which you can buy at a grocery store. But since we’re in Colorado, why not include something infused with cannabis in your loved one’s stocking this year?

Shutterstock.com/Canna Obscura

Shopping for retail marijuana in Denver is like time-traveling both into the future and back to the past. You can buy products here that aren’t available anywhere else in the world, and that includes on the Internet. Unlike clothes, electronics, books and even groceries, you can’t order cannabis delivered to your door in Colorado (although legal states Nevada and Oregon allow it, our state currently bans that option). And while the consistency of infused products’ effects has greatly improved since required potency and homogeneity tests began, it’s just as hard to keep up with cannabis trends today as it was when this all began in January 2014.

Newer, stronger forms of concentrates, more refined edibles brands and innovative infusion techniques are improving at a rate that’s tough for industry insiders to track, much less the average consumer. Just when you think you’ve figured out live resin and pressed rosin, distillate and isolate show up. Think lotions, patches and balms are the only topicals out there? Think again. These days, picking out the right product can feel more like spinning a roulette wheel of pre-filled vaporizers and CBD/THC mixtures than making an educated choice. To help you catch up, we’ve picked out our favorite cannabis products for the season, choosing edibles, drinks, concentrates and accessories that go exceptionally with hoodie weather and pumpkin-patch vibes.

lit_on_lit_3_lindsey_bartlettLindsey Bartlett

“Be a crazy, dumb saint of the mind…,” proclaims Daniel Landes, standing in a third-floor attic space in south Denver that feels nice, warm and present.

At first glance, this class may look like your average creative-writing workshop, with pens sprinkled across two tables in the center of the room, alongside desk lamps and composition notebooks. But Lit on Lit is a new kind of creative-writing class, one that puts something different on those tables: a bowl of cannabis and rolling papers to help spark creativity.

This is the first writing class in the country that invites attendees to smoke legal cannabis during the brainstorming session and the prompts.

He’s 50 and a father of seven.
Here’s your daily dose of pot news from the newsletter WeedWeek.
Bernard Noble, a Louisiana man serving 13 years for possessing two joints had his sentence reduced to eight years. He may be out in two.

In Michigan, MED patient fees fund marijuana enforcement including raid equipment.

Outgoing Vermont governor Peter Shumlin (D) offered to pardon anyone convicted for possessing up to an ounce. He supported an unsuccessful effort to legalize REC through the state legislature.

In Rolling Stone, the activist and rapper Killer Mike writes on how to bring more African-Americans into the industry. For more, see my story in California Sunday.

The NFL may be warming to MED. Switzerland too may be loosening up.

Ozy talks to a combat veteran who now grows cannabis. A dispensary in Massachusetts is giving away free seeds.

Joe Dolce’s new book “ Brave New Weed” gets a fond review by Matt Taibbi in the New York Times.

Boulder Weekly published a piece called “ Marijuana and the Thinking Teenager.

Canadian dispensary chain Cannabis Culture opened an illegal store in Montreal and gave away “ free nugs” to an approving crowd.

The L.A. Times went to the Emerald Cup in Sonoma County. It contrasts the revelers against, “a panel of entirely sober government officials [who]discussed the ramifications of marijuana legalization, California’s complex and evolving regulatory structure, and tried to answer questions about the future of the cannabis industry that seem, at this point, unanswerable.” The piece has many more great descriptions. Read the whole thing.

Some parents are upset that Amazon is sells children’s pot-leaf leggings. (I recently saw a pair, for adults, on sale in Aspen for $75.)

Now there’s CBD-infused water.

Social network MassRoots acquired online ordering platform Whaxy.

Mic put out an update on the state of cannabis investing.

It also said other drug problems are more pressing.
Here’s your daily dose of pot news from the newsletter WeedWeek.
In a report, the DEA said media attention is making it more difficult to prosecute marijuana offenders.
Ferrell Scott, sentenced to life without parole for possession and conspiracy to sell marijuana, was denied clemency by President Obama.

Charles “Eddy” Lepp, “a defiant 64-year-old Vietnam vet and ordained Rastafarian minister” was released after serving eight years in federal prison for growing.

Two pieces in The Guardian examine the human toll of Mexico’s decade-old, U.S. supported drug war

A New York Times photojournalist documented dozens of homicide victims of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s drug war. The Duterte administration defended its record to Reuters.

Big deal political thinker Ian Bremmer tweeted that Duterte wants to advise Trump on drug policy.

The activist New Jersey Weedman, who faces cannabis charges, compared himself to a “ prisoner at Guantanamo.

Leafly tells the stories of Sam Caldwell and Moses Baca, “ drug war prisoners 1 & 2,” in 1937. Both were apprehended in Denver. It also cites the work of a “48-year old drug felon and autodidactic cannabis historian who goes by the pen name “Uncle Mike,” maintains a site at UncleMikesResearch.com.

Steve Kerr, coach of the Golden State Warriors, said he tried MED for his back pain. It didn’t help him but he took a strong stand in favor of it for athletes:

“If you’re an NFL player, in particular, and you got lot of pain, I don’t think there’s any question that pot is better for your body than Vicodin,” Kerr, 51, said. “And yet, athletes everywhere are prescribed Vicodin like it’s Vitamin C, like it’s no big deal. And there’s like this perception in our country that over-the-counter drugs are fine but pot is bad. Now, I think that’s changing.”

The comment got attention and he later added to his remarks. Kerr said the NBA should explore MED for pain relief. New York Knicks president and celebrated coach Phil Jackson said he’d also used MED for pain adding, “I don’t think we have been able to stop it in the NBA. I think it still goes on and is still a part of the culture in the NBA. I think it is something that we either have to accommodate or figure out another way to deal with it.”

Forbes has more on the science of athletes and MED.

Vice asked budtenders about their worst customers. They’re not fond of weed snobs and scary types. The Cannabist serves up 10 budtender commandments, including “Thou Shalt Not Be Too High.”

The Pantone Color Institute, picked Greenery as the color of 2017.

The AP visits Malana, India, a Himalayan village that depends on cannabis. Uruguay will host a cannabis museum.

A bestseller in Germany and the U.K. says the Nazis ingested huge amounts of meth, and that Hitler was an opiate addict. “Blitzed,” will be published here in April.

vape_comic_den_20nov_19_of_50_Brandon Marshall

Cannabis and comic-book culture collided at the third annual Chromic Con. On Saturday, November 19, the Speakeasy Vape Lounge and Cannabis Club in Colorado Springs hosted the original marijuana-friendly comic-book convention. People came dressed as their favorite fantasy characters, studied comic books and graphic novels, and socialized while smoking their favorite herb. Here are five of our favorite things about Chromic Con:

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