Search Results: bowel (19)

The league and the plant appear to be on a collision course. 

Here’s your daily round-up of pot-news, excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek

Buffalo Bills offensive lineman Seantrel Henderson will serve a four-game suspension after testing positive for marijuana. Seantrel suffers from Crohn’s Disease and had bowel surgery early this year.

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones is not happy that rookie running back Ezekiel Elliott visited a pot shop in Seattle. Elliott didn’t buy anything according to TMZ. The Cowboys start the season tomorrow with three players suspended for substance abuse violations.

Controversial cannabis researcher Sue Sisley is on her way back to Colorado today, after six months that have been a “pretty barbaric rollercoaster,” she says. “One injustice after another, and I suspect it will not slow down for quite a while.” But at the end of November, the Arizona-based researcher finally caught a break: Colorado’s Medical Marijuana Scientific Advisory Council chose eight research-grant proposals for the Board of Health to consider at its December 17 meeting — including Sisley’s proposal to study the effectiveness of using marijuana to treat veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder.

MartialBacquet/commons, edited by TokeoftheTown.com.

A New York and Netherlands-based biotechnology company focusing on medical cannabis research says they plan to start making pot-infused bubblegum in the Netherlands that they plan to sell internationally.
Axim Biotechnologies, which already makes a product called CanChew that contains CBD, say they will manufacture CanChew and a new product, MedChew, which will contain THC. Officials with the company tell in-PharmaTechnologist.com they are already conducting clinical trials on patients with Multiple Sclerosis as well as inflammatory bowel problems and Crohn’s disease in Amsterdam.

At precisely 2:51 a.m. on Friday, June 20, the New York State Assembly passed the Compassionate Care Act, which (when the bill passes the senate, as it is widely expected to, when it is taken up around 10 a.m.) will make New York the 23rd state in the union where medical marijuana is legal…as long as you don’t smoke it. Seriously: Patients will need to use a vaporizer, pills or other extraction method. The use of joints, bongs and pipes–anything you light up–is strictly verboten.
Under the new law, physicians will have to go through a certification and registration process before they can prescribe the drug legally. Patients, likewise, will need to be certified by a doctor, and they will have to register with the Department of Health, which will provide an ID card proving one’s certification, but they will be free to carry up to 30 days supply of medical pot.

Wikimedia commons/Mats Holmström
Beatrice Ask.

Apparently it’s somewhat well known political satire isn’t huge in Sweden. That was made painfully clear this week when Beatrice Ask, Sweden’s Justice Minister, posted a link to a satirical article claiming that 37 people had overdosed and died on the day Colorado legalized adult sales of cannabis.
“Stupid and sad,” she wrote after posting the article on line via Facebook. “My first bill in the youth wing was called Outfight the Drugs! In this matter I haven’t changed opinion at all.”

Tonya Davis/Facebook
Tonya Davis is a medical marijuana activist in Ohio

By Tonya Davis
This is an open letter to my Ohio legislators.
 
I have nowhere else to turn. I hope you hear my cries for help and I hope you stand up for me. Representative Bobby Hagan will be  Re introducing the Ohio medical compassion act which I hope you will consider cosponsoring  in January 2013.
 
It would merely allow Ohio’s doctors and patients to decide whether or not medical cannabis could benefit them or not. It would allow the department of health to keep an eye on the program and make sure there were no abuses. Anyone that is in the program would be in a database so that you can keep track of this act of compassion.
 
We also believe that it would save Ohio taxpayers millions of dollars by not arresting, incarcerating  and prosecuting folks for making a choice using cannabis as medicine. we also believe that the Obama administration would not bother our program because there would not be storefronts or dispensaries selling the product.

Sharon Letts
No different than most, Caitlin’s smoking tray held a hand-blown glass pipe, a small, round grinder made from redwood, a vintage model ashtray, a sage smudge stick and a lighter


“It’s Not WeedsIt’s Real.”


By Sharon Letts

Jake shut the bathroom door behind him, cracked the window, dropped his drawers and sat down on the toilet.
And so begins the morning ritual of medicating.
Removing his smoking tray from the cupboard under the sink, he rinsed the previous evening’s dirty bong water, filling it with fresh, wiping it down with a rag, and setting it aside. Next, he chooses his medicine from an assortment of small, glass Mason jars.
“Cat Piss,” he said, adding, “Where in the hell do they come up with these names?”
Breaking up the bud and filling the grinder, he thought, “Down to the last nug.” He filled the bowl with soft, gray-green goodness and inhaled, closing his eyes, “Doesn’t smell a thing like cat piss!”

UCSF
Hector Vizoso, RN, left, and Donald Abrams, MD, prepare a cannabis vaporizer for inpatient use at San Francisco General Hospital & Trauma Center’s Clinical Research Center.

​A medical study suggests patients with chronic pain could experience more relief if their doctors added cannabinoids — the main ingredients in cannabis or medical marijuana — to an opiates-only treatment. The findings, from a small-scale study at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF), also suggest that a combined therapy could result in reduced opiate dosages.

More than 76 million Americans suffer from chronic pain. That’s more people than have diabetes, heart disease and cancer combined, according to the National Centers for Health Statistics.

Toke of the Town editor Steve Elliott: You’ve come to the right place if you wanna talk about marijuana.

​Two years ago today — actually two years ago tonight, at 7:08 p.m. — fingers trembling with excitement, I hit the “Post” button for the first-ever story on Toke of the Town.

“The good thing about a free marketplace of ideas is,” I wrote, in the first sentence ever to appear on this site, “despite the best efforts of prohibitionists and their fear-mongering propaganda, the truth eventually prevails.”

Thousands of stories, joints, medibles, and bongloads later, I’m still loving this gig, and judging by pageviews, so are more than half a million of you every month.
Toke didn’t just happen. If it hadn’t been for Village Voice Media’s then-social media talent scout, John Boitnott, spotting my personal blog Reality Catcher making the front page of social news-sharing site Digg, I wouldn’t have had the chance, starting early in 2009, to write “Chronic City.” That was a twice-weekly cannabis column for S.F. Weekly‘s online blog, “The Snitch.”
And if it hadn’t been for Boitnoitt and Bill Jensen, then in charge of VVM’s web presence worldwide, that well-received column would not have opened the door for Toke of the Town about six months later.

Wish I Didn’t Know

​Cannabis may have a positive effect on disease activity in Crohn’s disease, a chronic inflammatory bowel disease, according to a new observational study at Tel Aviv University, Israel.

In the study, disease activity, use of medication, need for surgery, and hospitalization before and after cannabis use were examined in 30 patients, reports the International Association for Cannabis Medicines (IACM). Disease activity was assessed by the Harvey Bradshaw index for Crohn’s disease.
The indication for cannabis use was lack of response to conventional treatment in 21 patients and chronic intractable pain in six. Another four patients used cannabis for recreational purposes and continued as they observed an improvement in their medical condition.
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