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Denver Ordinance 300, which is on the ballot this November, would allow businesses to opt into allowing marijuana on their premises. After proponents put up a billboard pointing out that allowing restaurants to have private consumption areas would keep tokers off the sidewalk, Westword sat down with Rachel O’Bryan, the campaign manager for Protect Denver’s Atmosphere, the group opposing the initiative. An attorney by trade, O’Bryan was part of a task force that addressed possible criminal-law issues after Amendment 64 passed, allowing recreational marijuana in Colorado. O’Bryan makes it clear that her group is not opposed to recreational marijuana or legalization per se, but opposes 300 specifically as a matter of public safety.

NORML
Bryan Epis has been silenced by the federal government as a condition of his sentencing agreement

Editor’s note: Recently, a remarkable resolution was reached on a federal medical marijuana case involving Bryan Epis, a California cannabis club operator, under which Epis had to agree not to be involved in marijuana activism. Epis’s attorney, John Balazs, has contributed his thoughts about the case below in a guest post which is reprinted here with his permission.

By John Balazs
Attorney
Bryan James Epis is a well-known medical marijuana activist who is believed to be the first person to be tried in federal court for cultivating marijuana for medical purposes after the 1996 ballot initiative that legalized medical marijuana in California. Although only 458 plants were found at his residence, the government extrapolated from a disputed spreadsheet to project that his “conspiracy” to grow marijuana was for at least 1,000 plants, the threshold to trigger a mandatory minimum 10-year sentence. 

Are stoners lazy? Not according to a recent University of Colorado Boulder study that questions the “lazy stoner” stereotype. Overseen by Angela Bryan, a professor in CU Boulder’s Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, as well as the Institute for Cognitive Science, the study looked at a possible link between cannabis use and exercise behaviors.

“If we think about the typical ways you think of cannabis, it’s making you more relaxed and maybe not as motivated to get out of the house, and as an exercise researcher, that’s concerning,” says Bryan. “On the other hand, there’s some really good longitudinal data that shows that long-term cannabis users have lower weight, lower risk of diabetes, better waist-to-hip ratio, and better insulin function. It’s kind of a scientific quandary, so we thought we should do investigations to see whether there really is a problem that might be happening, or if cannabis could even be a benefit to physical activity.”

A recent report from a Colorado organization devoted to keeping children away from marijuana advocates for potency limits on cannabis products, which continue to get stronger and stronger.

“This is very different from marijuana in the 1980s,” says Rachel O’Bryan, co-founder of Smart Colorado, whose mission statement notes that the outfit “engages and informs Coloradans on the risks that marijuana poses to youth.” As a result, she maintains, “it’s a fundamentally different game.”

Kobe Bryant chucked a lot of junk at the hoop and had poor stats in clutch moments, but his delusional fans still try to inject his name into conversations about LeBron and MJ. (Feel free to email me your hot takes that argue otherwise.) Needless to say, I’m not a fan. So when I saw a strain named Black Mamba — the nickname of the all-time clunker — I abstained. But then a plump, purple cut on display at Verde Natural persuaded me to give it a try.

Like most egotistical turds without any friends to give him one, Kobe had to adopt his own nickname, one that he thought signified how his superior competitive ability would finish his opponents with the venom-like ferocity of an African snake. The Black Mamba strain, however, is anything but forced, with at least three different variants all deserving of the moniker. 

Yesterday, proponents of Initiated Ordinance 300 declared victory for the measure,  which will create a pilot program to allow adults to consume cannabis in permitted private establishments such as bars and restaurants.

But Rachel O’Bryan, who served as campaign manager for Protect Denver’s Atmosphere, the main organization opposing 300, is much less enthusiastic about the proposal’s belated win, which was finally announced a full week after election day. Indeed, she predicts a slew of problems when it comes to implementing the ordinance.

There are still places in Colorado without dispensaries, believe it or not — but fewer of them every month. In October, a medical marijuana dispensary license was granted to a store in Tabernash, and several other licenses were allotted in municipalities that have established dispensaries — including recreational cannabis shops for those of you planning to visit the Mile High City and Colorado.

“Hi, we’re in Delaware.”


A University of Delaware poll released this week shows that 56 percent of Delawareans would support the legalizaiton and regulation of limited amounts of cannabis.
The poll, conducted on 902 adults in September, showed a meager 39 percent opposed marijuana – that group mostly populated by old conservative voters.


The girlfriend of a killer once housed inside the Orange County, California Jail testified Wednesday that a friendly sheriff’s deputy twice secretly tipped her to potential searches so she wouldn’t be caught smuggling contraband including drugs and weapons inside the facility. Prosecutor Aleta Bryant elicited the testimony from Ha Duc Nguyen who is hoping her statements in support of the government’s bribery case against now fired deputy David Lloyd Cass will result in her lenient punishment for the illegal, two-year smuggling operation.
Nguyen told the jury that on December 3, 2011–the day she was planning to smuggle marijuana, candy and a cell phone (plus charger and cord) to killer Stephenson Choi Kim–Cass contacted her with a warning. More over at the OC Weekly.

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