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Marijuana’s future in the United States remains a hot topic as Super Tuesday approaches. Formerly dismissed by virtually every presidential candidate, supporting pot legalization now seems a prerequisite for any
Democratic hopeful. The level of support varies, however, with some candidates preferring giving states the right to choose, while others are pledging to legalize marijuana through executive action if need be.

Before you submit your ballot for the March 3 count, read the past and present pot opinions of the eight Democratic contenders below.

As we’ve reported, George Brauchler, 18th Judicial District DA and candidate for Colorado Attorney General, opposed Amendment 64, the 2012 measure that legalized limited recreational marijuana sales in the state, and he doesn’t think its passage has done anything to eliminate violent crime associated with pot. As AG, however, Brauchler says he would defend the state’s cannabis laws against threats from the likes of Attorney General Jeff Sessions while at the same time using a new strategy to attack the proliferation of illegal grows across Colorado, many of them allegedly associated with foreign drug cartels.

On January 19, over 1,000 people attended the Vangst Cannabis Career Fair, where they got some face time with some of the largest cannabis companies in Colorado. Vangst, a job-placement company, aims to make it easier for new-to-cannabis job seekers to explore opportunities, and this third fair provided more opportunities than ever to look at the legal cannabis industry, At the same time, vendors got a chance to size up the candidates.

Big-name brands such as Native Roots and Leafly lined the walls of the fair. Native Roots is one of the major employers of Colorado’s cannabis space, with close to 700 employees. Now it’s trying to fill corporate positions in its marketing and IT departments.  “We are looking for talented individuals to work sales in two future stores,” said one Native Roots rep. “I’ve also seen some good corporate candidates here, too.”

It’s a sign of the times.

What public statements have Colorado’s candidates for the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives made about marijuana, rescheduling and research? Here’s our rundown.

U.S. Senate Candidates

Michael Bennet (D)
Incumbent Michael Bennet faces challenges from seven nominees from a variety of parties. Along with 27 other senators, Bennet wrote a letter to President Barack Obama asking for his assistance in removing the administrative barriers to scientific research on medical marijuana. “As states have attempted to expand access to medical treatments for their citizens, the federal government has a responsibility to act in a manner that allows patients to benefit from research on those treatments,” the senators said. “Until we have comprehensive scientific research on the medical risks and benefits of cannabis and its derivatives, we will continue to debate this issue on the basis of outdated ideology instead of modern science.”


Yesterday on Israeli national television, a prominent Israeli political figure announced that he had recently taken a toke or two of cannabis. Of course, had he been caught doing it in his homeland, without the proper medical permit to be doing so, he would be breaking the law.
So seeing a conservative member of Israel’s Home Party just blurt out a confession to the world may have been surprising to some, but only if they haven’t been paying attention to Yinon Magal and his rise in national politics.

Adrian Wyllie.


When Adrian Wyllie is elected the next governor of Florida, he’s going to legalize all marijuana and have it regulated like alcohol. That’s just one of a plethora of libertarian ideas from the Libertarian candidate, who is looking to take down establishment candidates Rick Scott and Charlie Crist.
Like any Libertarian, he believes government should mind its own damned business and stop meddling in people’s lives. That includes same-sex marriage, taxes, Medicare, and, yep, weed. But no one knows this. Because he’s not even getting an opportunity to debate it with Scott or Crist directly, which is significant. Because while Wyllie’s chances of actually winning this thing are slim to none, he might just tip the scales one way or the other for those other two guys. More at the Broward-Palm Beach New Times.

Gunnar Ries Amphibol/Commons edited by Toke of the Town.


Don Willis wants to kill wolves. He also wants to be governor, but right now he’s all about killing him some wolves. So much so, that he’s made it a part of his gubernatorial campaign strategy. See, Wyomong has permitted wolf hunts in the past but this year a federal judge put the animals – a key component to the western ecosystem – on a protected list. That pisses off Willis, who (as previously noted) just wants wolves to die. Now Willis is saying the state should allow the hunt despite the federal protection because Colorado has legal weed.


Two-time Miami Beach mayoral candidate Steve Berke had himself a pro-medical marijuana parody hit on YouTube with “You’re the Law that I Want (Yes on 2).” Set to the song “You’re the One That I Want” from the musical Grease, Berke and his crew dance and sing while urging Florida voters to yes on Amendment 2, which would legalize medical marijuana.
The four-minute parody racked up 300,000 views and was featured on Comedy Central, Buzzfeed, and the Huffington Post, according to its producers. But it’s been pulled by the site, after the Warner/Chappell music company claimed it violated its copyright. Apparently nobody told Warner/Chappell that satire and parody are fair use in the United States.


The Democratic candidate challenging Vicky Hartzler for her seat in the U.S. Congress is calling on Governor Jay Nixon to grant clemency to Jeff Mizanskey, the man serving a life sentence for non-violent marijuana offenses.
Nate Irvin, 25, kicked off his support with a press conference Monday on the capitol lawn, where Mizanskey’s brother Mike gave an emotional plea. Mizanskey, whose story is detailed in a Riverfront Times cover story, has been in jail for 21 years and has no possibility of parole. After learning about Mizanskey’s plight from Aaron Malin, the director of research for Show-Me Cannabis, Irvin said he wanted to use his race for Congress to shed light on Mizanskey’s sentence, which he calls “excessive to the point of absurdity.”

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