Search Results: capecchi (19)


Earlier this month, high-ranking folks from the health department staffers gave an all-day presentation about pot. They urged the public to take a look at the first draft of rules governing the program, as well as the application for growers, and be honest.
In response, the DC-based Marijuana Policy Project, whose lobbyists played a key role in getting legislation passed here, submitted a six-page critique. The goal, writes Robert Capecchi, a deputy director, should be to avoid regulating the growers out of business while offering protections for patients and the facilities that produce the medicine.

For almost two years now, medical marijuana patients the state of Delaware have been sitting in limbo waiting on their state to enact medical marijuana dispensary laws passed in May of 2011.
Thankfully, they won’t have to wait much longer as Gov. Jack Markell announced last week that lawmakers will establish the rules and implement the program soon.

Tyler Drumm/The New Maine Times

At least four state legislatures will consider replacing marijuana prohibition with regulation
 
On Election Day, voters in the states of Colorado and Washington approved ballot initiatives to remove criminal penalties for adult marijuana use and regulate the substance in a manner similar to alcohol. State legislators from Rhode Island and Maine on Thursday will join the Marijuana Policy Project on a teleconference press call to announce that they are introducing similar bills to tax and regulate marijuana in their state legislatures.

StoptheDrugWar.org

Gov. Chafee Signs Bill Making Rhode Island the 15th State to Remove Criminal Penalties for Small Amounts of Marijuana
 
Governor Lincoln Chafee of Rhode Island on Wednesday signed legislation that will reduce the penalty for possession of marijuana to a $150 civil fine for most offenses.
Last week, the Rhode Island General Assembly voted in support of the two identical bills that will make possession of up to an ounce of marijuana a civil infraction, similar to a parking ticket, and will remove the criminal penalties that currently exist. Minors found with marijuana, in addition to the civil fine, will be sentenced to drug education courses and community service.
Marijuana possession is now punishable in Rhode Island by up to a $500 fine and up to a year in jail. The new law will go into effect on April 1, 2013.

Reason

Bills Would Replace Criminal Penalties for Possession of Small Amounts of Marijuana with a Fine
 
The Rhode Island House and Senate on Tuesday voted in favor of twin bills that would reduce the penalty for possession of marijuana to a $150 civil fine for most offenses.
H 7092 and its companion bill, S 2253, would make possession of up to an ounce of marijuana a civil infraction — similar in seriousness to a parking ticket — and would remove the criminal penalties that currently exist.
Marijuana possession is now punishable in Rhode Island by up to a $500 fine and up to a year in jail.
These bills received overwhelming support in both chambers, passing with a vote of 50 to 24 in the House and 28 to 6 in the Senate.  

Reality Catcher

Bills Would Replace Criminal Penalties for Possession of Small Amounts of Marijuana with a Fine
The Rhode Island House and Senate Judiciary Committees on Tuesday voted in favor of two bills that would reduce the penalty for possession of marijuana to a $150 civil fine for most offenses.
H 7092 and its companion bill, S 2253, would make possession of less than an ounce of marijuana a civil infraction, similar to a parking ticket, and would remove the criminal penalties that currently exist. Marijuana possession is now punishable in Rhode Island by up to a $500 fine and up to a year in jail.
The bills will now go to their respective floors for a full vote.

Zazzle

​A January 25-26 Public Policy Polling survey found strong support for marijuana policy reform, including more than two-to-one support for reducing the penalty for possession of marijuana to a $150 civil fine. Marijuana possession is now punishable in Rhode Island by a $500 fine and up to a year in jail.
 
Of those polled, an overwhelming 65 percent supported decreasing the penalties for simple possession of less than an ounce of marijuana by removing the possibility of jail time and making the offense a civil citation. Such a change received support from across the political spectrum, with 73 percent of Democrats, 64 percent of Republicans, and 60 percent of independents in favor of the measure.
Two bills, H 7092 and S 2253, have been introduced in the Rhode Island House and Senate to remove the threat of arrest and jail for personal possession of less than an ounce of marijuana.

San Francisco Sentinel
California State Senator Mark Leno has been a consistent champion for medical marijuana patients’ rights

​Despite hundreds of letters urging California lawmakers to support legislation to improve California’s marijuana policies, two bills that would have done just that failed to advance out of their respective chambers by Tuesday’s deadline.
Although both proposals enjoy strong public support, both were pulled prior to a vote by their sponsors due to a lack of majority support in their respective chambers.
The first bill was AB 1017, introduced by Assemblymember Tom Ammiano. This bill proposed changing the penalty for marijuana cultivation from an automatic felony to a “wobbler” that could be charged as a misdemeanor. AB 1017 received a vote last spring, when it lost 24-36, but it did not garner enough support to pass if it was voted on again.

HempNews

​On January 1, 2011, a law passed by the California State Legislature and signed by then-Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger went into effect that removed criminal penalties for possession of up to an ounce of marijuana, making the violation a civil citation similar to a parking ticket. Supporters of the law argued that it would remove some of the financial burden associated with arresting people for marijuana possession, while lessening the damage done by having a criminal record.
Advocates now eagerly await the release of arrest data, as well as state expenditures on marijuana enforcement and prosecution, to determine if the state is adequately following the law.
 
“Serious unintended consequences have surfaced as a result of this mischaracterization [marijuana possession being a misdemeanor as opposed to a civil infraction],” said Sen. Mark Leno, the bill’s sponsor, during debate on the bill in 2010.

Medical Marijuana Blog

​The “Jacki Rickert Medical Marijuana Act,” which would let seriously ill Wisconsin residents use marijuana to treat their illnesses, has again been introduced to the state Legislature.

The bill, LRB-2466/1,  introduced at a Wednesday press conference by sponsor Rep. Mark Pocan (D-Madison), would allow patients to grow small amounts of marijuana to treat specific conditions, as well as permit the establishment of regulated and licensed cultivation and distribution centers within the state.
Sen. Jon Erpenbach (D-Waunakee) is co-sponsoring the bill in the Wisconsin Senate. A similar bill was introduced last session but did not pass. Now Republicans control both the Senate and the Assembly and political observers say it’s unlikely to pass this time, either.
Rep. Pocan was joined on Wednesday by patients and medical professionals who support the right to have safe access to medicinal cannabis.
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