Search Results: cbs (169)

A screen capture from the CBS report about Operation Grow4Vets, on view below.

Back in May, we told you about Operation Grow4Vets, an organization dedicated to providing free cannabis to veterans who may be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder.
Now, founder Roger Martin’s brainchild has gotten its biggest boost yet: a CBS profile on view below. And he hopes the exposure will help bring the project to the next level.


More than 20 percent of all vets coming home from the Middle East report at least some symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. For some, it shows in depression and anxiety or an inability to function normally in day-to-day civilian life. For others, it’s more grave.
After two tours in Afghanistan, Matt Kahl says the only way out he saw after returning home was through suicide. He tried and failed, and likely would have tried again if it wasn’t for one thing: cannabis.

While every Colorado town has a story, most are – in some way or another – related to the state’s rich mining history. Not Garden City, however. That town was founded on alcohol. Specifically: booze was outlawed in Greeley, Colorado even after prohibition, so in 1935 town founders created a four block by five block devoted to bars and liquor sales.
In a case of history repeating itself, Greeley has banned recreational pot sales, but not Garden City.

Another year, another well-respected national poll confirms that a majority of Americans think that marijuana should be legal under federal law.
In April 2013, Pew Research found that for the first time since it began polling people back in the 1970s, most Americans thought pot should be legal. Now, CBS News has found that a majority of respondents favor marijuana legalization. It’s a view shared by 51 percent of those polled versus just 44 percent who still oppose legal weed.
But what else did the poll find? OC Weekly has the breakdown.

Saja Forum
The home of new parents Priya David and Alex Clemens was raided by FBI agents looking for marijuana Wednesday morning.

​A team of heavily armed Federal Bureau of Investigation agents looking for marijuana on Wednesday morning wrongly raided the home of new parents Alex Clemens and Priya David in Alameda, California.

David, a CBS News correspondent, and her husband Clemens were at home with their newborn child when they heard a banging on the door just after 7 a.m., reports KCBS.
“Our first thought was the neighborhood is on fire,” Clemens said. “I see what turns out to be eight uniformed, armored, armed officers — four of which are pointing guns through the window at my face.”

Graphic: NORML

​The fight around CBS’s initial refusal to run a pro-legalization ad from the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) ended in victory Wednesday afternoon, reports Te-Ping Chen at Change.org.

Last month, CBS denied NORML’s request to place an ad in Times Square that featured the potential billions of dollars in tax revenue that would result from legalizing marijuana.
Remember, this is the network that runs stoner-friendly ads for their Showtime Network show, Weeds. CBS is also the network that had no problem running an extremely controversial anti-abortion ad aimed at peak viewership during the Super Bowl.

Graphic: NORML
Neutron Media to NORML: “If CBS changes their morals we will let you know.” (See the rejected ad below.)

CBS and Neutron Media Screen Marketing have rejected a paid marijuana legalization advertisement from NORML that was intended to appear on the CBS Super Screen billboard in New York City’s Time Square.
The 15-second ad, which asserts that taxing and regulating the adult use and sale of marijuana would raise billions of dollars in national revenue, was scheduled to appear on CBS’s 42nd Street digital billboard beginning February 1.
According to NORML, representatives from Neutron Media approached the pro-pot organization in mid-January about placing the ad, which was scheduled to air 18 times per day for a two-month period. The NORML Foundation entered into a contractual agreement with Neutron Media to air two separate NORML advertisements, and produced an initial ad exclusively for broadcast on the CBS digital billboard.

During a recent interview with Westword, Smart Approaches to Marijuana President and CEO Kevin Sabet, one of America’s most influential critics of cannabis legalization, offered an unexpected observation about his visits to Denver. According to Sabet, a number of vehicles provided to him by Denver International Airport rental-car businesses over the past few years have smelled strongly of pot. He added that he’s had to exchange rentals multiple times at DIA before he’s been given one that didn’t reek of weed, giving him numerous opportunities to “educate” personnel at the agencies about the scope of a problem he views as positively chronic.

He’s 50 and a father of seven.
Here’s your daily dose of pot news from the newsletter WeedWeek.
Bernard Noble, a Louisiana man serving 13 years for possessing two joints had his sentence reduced to eight years. He may be out in two.

In Michigan, MED patient fees fund marijuana enforcement including raid equipment.

Outgoing Vermont governor Peter Shumlin (D) offered to pardon anyone convicted for possessing up to an ounce. He supported an unsuccessful effort to legalize REC through the state legislature.

In Rolling Stone, the activist and rapper Killer Mike writes on how to bring more African-Americans into the industry. For more, see my story in California Sunday.

The NFL may be warming to MED. Switzerland too may be loosening up.

Ozy talks to a combat veteran who now grows cannabis. A dispensary in Massachusetts is giving away free seeds.

Joe Dolce’s new book “ Brave New Weed” gets a fond review by Matt Taibbi in the New York Times.

Boulder Weekly published a piece called “ Marijuana and the Thinking Teenager.

Canadian dispensary chain Cannabis Culture opened an illegal store in Montreal and gave away “ free nugs” to an approving crowd.

The L.A. Times went to the Emerald Cup in Sonoma County. It contrasts the revelers against, “a panel of entirely sober government officials [who]discussed the ramifications of marijuana legalization, California’s complex and evolving regulatory structure, and tried to answer questions about the future of the cannabis industry that seem, at this point, unanswerable.” The piece has many more great descriptions. Read the whole thing.

Some parents are upset that Amazon is sells children’s pot-leaf leggings. (I recently saw a pair, for adults, on sale in Aspen for $75.)

Now there’s CBD-infused water.

Social network MassRoots acquired online ordering platform Whaxy.

Mic put out an update on the state of cannabis investing.

It also said other drug problems are more pressing.
Here’s your daily dose of pot news from the newsletter WeedWeek.
In a report, the DEA said media attention is making it more difficult to prosecute marijuana offenders.
Ferrell Scott, sentenced to life without parole for possession and conspiracy to sell marijuana, was denied clemency by President Obama.

Charles “Eddy” Lepp, “a defiant 64-year-old Vietnam vet and ordained Rastafarian minister” was released after serving eight years in federal prison for growing.

Two pieces in The Guardian examine the human toll of Mexico’s decade-old, U.S. supported drug war

A New York Times photojournalist documented dozens of homicide victims of Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte’s drug war. The Duterte administration defended its record to Reuters.

Big deal political thinker Ian Bremmer tweeted that Duterte wants to advise Trump on drug policy.

The activist New Jersey Weedman, who faces cannabis charges, compared himself to a “ prisoner at Guantanamo.

Leafly tells the stories of Sam Caldwell and Moses Baca, “ drug war prisoners 1 & 2,” in 1937. Both were apprehended in Denver. It also cites the work of a “48-year old drug felon and autodidactic cannabis historian who goes by the pen name “Uncle Mike,” maintains a site at UncleMikesResearch.com.

Steve Kerr, coach of the Golden State Warriors, said he tried MED for his back pain. It didn’t help him but he took a strong stand in favor of it for athletes:

“If you’re an NFL player, in particular, and you got lot of pain, I don’t think there’s any question that pot is better for your body than Vicodin,” Kerr, 51, said. “And yet, athletes everywhere are prescribed Vicodin like it’s Vitamin C, like it’s no big deal. And there’s like this perception in our country that over-the-counter drugs are fine but pot is bad. Now, I think that’s changing.”

The comment got attention and he later added to his remarks. Kerr said the NBA should explore MED for pain relief. New York Knicks president and celebrated coach Phil Jackson said he’d also used MED for pain adding, “I don’t think we have been able to stop it in the NBA. I think it still goes on and is still a part of the culture in the NBA. I think it is something that we either have to accommodate or figure out another way to deal with it.”

Forbes has more on the science of athletes and MED.

Vice asked budtenders about their worst customers. They’re not fond of weed snobs and scary types. The Cannabist serves up 10 budtender commandments, including “Thou Shalt Not Be Too High.”

The Pantone Color Institute, picked Greenery as the color of 2017.

The AP visits Malana, India, a Himalayan village that depends on cannabis. Uruguay will host a cannabis museum.

A bestseller in Germany and the U.K. says the Nazis ingested huge amounts of meth, and that Hitler was an opiate addict. “Blitzed,” will be published here in April.

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