Search Results: censorship (18)


Dope! That’s what comic books are! Dope! And those dirty books should be scrubbed, put through the wringer and have the dirt squeezed from them!
At least, that’s the gist of this December 30, 1948 column in the Steamboat (Colorado) Pilot by George Bowra, an (at the time) relatively well-known figure in the American West. The tone of the article is over the top, bordering on satire — which might make sense considering Bowra’s history as a colorful character. But we’re not so sure he was joking.

Bodhi Group
Canadian farmer harvests a bountiful hemp crop. He could be joined by his U.S. neighbors if Sen. Ron Wyden’s amendment to the Farm Bill is successful

Vote Hemp Encourages Support for Proposed Amendment by Senator Wyden on Industrial Hemp in the Farm Bill
Amendment Would Exclude Industrial Hemp From the Definition of Marijuana
Vote Hemp released an action alert on Thursday encouraging support for Senator Ron Wyden’s submitted last-minute amendment to the Farm Bill, S. 3240, the Agriculture Reform, Food, and Jobs Act of 2012, which would exclude industrial hemp from the definition of “marihuana.”

Hemp History Week


Public Education Campaign to Bring Back Industrial Hemp Farming will Feature More Than 800 Grassroots Events and Retail Store Promotions Throughout All 50 States
 
Monday, June 4 marks the start of the third annual Hemp History Week, June 4-10, 2012. The national grassroots education campaign organized by Vote Hemp and The Hemp Industries Association is designed to renew strong support for the return of hemp farming to the U.S.
Hemp History Week 2012 will feature more than 800 events in cities and towns throughout all 50 states. The multifaceted campaign will feature more than 100 grassroots volunteer-led events; more than 700 retail promotions; a restaurant program; and a letter writing and email campaign to encourage Congress to change federal policy and allow American farmers to once again grow industrial hemp.
A new Web site, along with a promotional video for the 2012 campaign, is viewable at www.HempHistoryWeek.com.
 
The theme of the 2012 campaign is Hemp for a Healthy Future: Healthy Lifestyles, Healthy Economy, Healthy Planet.

The World Through My Specs
Peter Reynolds of CLEAR is engaged in a tug-of-war with ex-members of the organization’s Executive Committee

By Denzil White
Special to Toke of the Town
In suit and tie, Peter Reynolds looks more like an extra from the set of Mad Men than like the hairy-headed hippie stereotype of a cannabis activist. He’s definitely not hairy-headed, but when he promised to clean up the image of cannabis campaigning in the UK, few people expected the makeover to result in a beauty only skin deep.
Claiming a background in advertising and public relations, Peter Reynolds won leadership of the Legalise Cannabis Alliance, a small, single-issue political party, then set about changing the name of the party to CLEAR (Cannabis Law Reform) and brought on help to spruce up the party’s website and logo.
Reynolds wrote at the time, “We will build a new and effective brand and campaign. We are reasonable, responsible, respectable members of society from all walks of life and professions.” 
Things were looking good; MPs hit Reynolds’ “Friend” button on Facebook and the CLEAR “Comment Warriors” plagued the popular press with pro-cannabis comments on any article reporting a factory raid or medicinal marijuana critique.

Pulsamerica
The groundbreaking meeting — the first time sitting presidents are seriously debating alternatives to drug prohibition — was initiated by and will be hosted by Guatemalan President Otto Pérez Molina.

Saturday: Presidents To Hold Historic Meeting To Discuss Strategies To Reduce Prohibition-Related Crime, Violence and Corruption
 
First Time Ever That Sitting Presidents Are Calling For All Options, Including Legalization And Decriminalization, To Be Put On The Table
 
Momentum Builds for Unprecedented Debate at Summit of The Americas in Colombia in April
 
This Saturday, March 24, a historic meeting will take place when presidents from Central America come together in Guatemala to discuss legalization, decriminalization and other strategies for reducing the region’s prohibition-related violence, crime and corruption.
The meeting, initiated and hosted by Guatemalan President Otto Pérez Molina, represents the first time ever that sitting presidents are seriously debating alternatives to drug prohibition – and it comes just weeks before the topic will be considered for the first time at the Summit of the Americas meeting in Colombia in mid-April.

Electronic Frontier Foundation

███ ██ █ ████ the Drug War ███ █████ is █████ ████ ████ good ████ and you ███ █should ██████ trust █████ ██████ ███ your █████ ████ government.

(Parts of this comment have been found in violation of H.R. 3261, S.O.P.A and Senate Bill 968, P.I.P.A. and has been censored for your benefit.)

Graphic: Peter Pauper Press
It’s “too controversial” for the uptight Chinese, but ready for you on September 15

​Communist Bosses Won’t Even Allow Book Inside The Country

The worldwide release of an American book on cannabis has been delayed, due to the refusal of the communist government of China to allow its binding on Chinese soil, according to the publisher.

The Little Black Book of Marijuana, by yours truly, Toke of the Town editor Steve Elliott, was scheduled for availability on August 1, but that printing schedule was thrown off after the totalitarian Chinese government decided the book was “too controversial” to even allow the printed pages inside the tightly-run dictatorship.
“Our printer is located in Hong Kong, with binderies in mainland China,” production manager Ginny Reynolds of Peter Pauper Press explained to me Friday morning. “Usually it’s no problem to move printed books from Hong Kong to China for binding.
“However, Chinese censorship is extremely tight,” Reynolds told Toke of the Town. “Any content deemed ‘sensitive’ or ‘controversial’ by their standards is banned.”

Graphic: NORML Stash Blog
Fuck censorship.

​​In March, the National Cancer Institute (NCI), a component agency of the National Institutes of Health, acknowledged the medicinal benefits of marijuana in its online treatment database. But the information only stayed up a few days, before it was scrubbed from the site.

Now, newly obtained documents reveal not only how NCI database contributors arrived at their March 17 summary of marijuana’s medical uses, but also the furious politicking that went into quickly scrubbing that summary of information regarding the potential tumor-fighting effects of cannabis, reports Kyle Daly at the Washington Independent.
Phil Mocek, a civil liberties activist with the Seattle-based Cannabis Defense Coalition, obtained the documents as a result of a Freedom Of Information Act (FOIA) request he filed in March after reading coverage of the NCI’s action. Mocek has made some of the hundreds of pages of at-times heated email exchanges and summary alterations available on MuckRock, a website devoted to FOIA requests and government documents.

Graphic: NORML Stash Blog
“NCI apparently got a talking to from someone” ~ Radical Russ Belville, NORML


Welcome to Room 420, where your instructor is Mr. Ron Marczyk and your subjects are wellness, disease prevention, self actualization, and chillin’.

Worth Repeating

By Ron Marczyk, R.N.
Health Education Teacher (Retired)

You are witnessing cannabis history in the making.
You can clearly see what happened, in the illustration above. The government has changed the verbiage regarding cannabis on the National Cancer Institute’s cancer.gov website, only 11 days after it was added.

We demand that the original statement be re-posted as it was, and for the National Cancer Institute to stand by its original research statement.

This was a naked political move. Please call the NCI public inquiry phone line at 301-435-3848 or email them at http://www.cancer.gov/global/contact/email-us.

Photo: We Must Know

​Welcome to Room 420, where your instructor is Mr. Ron Marczyk and your subjects are wellness, disease prevention, self actualization, and chillin’.


Worth Repeating

By Ron Marczyk, R.N.
Health Education Teacher (Retired)

In 1974 researchers learned that THC, an active chemical in marijuana, shrank or destroyed brain tumors in test mice.

But the Drug Enforcement Administration quickly shut down the study and destroyed its results, which were never replicated — until now.
Here is the study the DEA funded, then tried to destroy and remove from universities across the United States — and the first redo study that proved it correct.

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