Search Results: clothing (65)

Two of the three 30lb parcels of pot that showed up at City Blue this week

Founded on 13th and market Street in downtown Philadelphia in 1981, the high styled retail outlet City Blue now has 25 locations across Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey, and Ohio.
Touting themselves as “a leader and innovator in urban fashion”, managers in all City Blue locations are likely very busy these days ordering in new items to be sure that their shelves are fully stocked for the holiday rush. With so many packages in transit during this time of year, mistakes certainly do happen, but when the manager of the City Blue store in Upper Darby, PA sliced into an unknown package delivered to his store earlier this week, he was greeted by a box full of product that he simply could not sell…at least, not legally.

Ana Izquierdo, better known as La Reina de Mota (“the queen of marijuana” in Spanish) has been a longtime advocate for cannabis as a remedy for certain forms of trauma and other mental health diagnoses. Izquierdo herself has survived her own struggles, such as drug addiction in her early adult life and fighting homelessness for five years. After seeing how cannabis positively impacted her own life and personal battles, she decided to dive head-first into different avenues in Colorado’s new industry, from cannabis fashion to social responsibility with other cannabis industry leaders.

Izquierdo has used her role in cannabis to organize clothing kits for the homeless and provide aid to Puerto Rico with other cannabis leaders after the region was struck by hurricanes Maria and Irma. Now a YouTube channel host who gives advice to others struggling with addiction, Izquierdo hopes her story will inspire people who faced the same battles that she did while considering cannabis as a way to heal and find new communities of friends. We caught up with Izquierdo to learn more about what pulled her into the cannabis space, the challenges she’s faced as a woman in the industry, and how she’s used the plant to propel herself forward.

Hemp, marijuana’s non-psychoactive counterpart, can be turned into a large variety of products. And in 2016, Colorado farmers produced half of the hemp grown in the United States. Even after more states started growing the crop in 2017, Colorado still planted over three times more of it than any other state in the country, with North Dakota and Kentucky following next, according to the Colorado Department of Agriculture.

But Colorado’s ability to process the plant is limited, because it doesn’t have a decorticator, a machine that separates hemp’s stringy outer layer, called the baste, from its woody core, known as the hurd. Traditional farming equipment and wood chippers get jammed up by the fibers, a kink that Cuno Hansen, head of clothing company All Seeing Colorado LLC, aims to fix by bringing in the state’s first decorticator.

High Times magazine launched in the summer of 1974 and has documented the evolution of the marijuana industry though the decades. Now, in partnership with Emerald Brand Solutions, the magazine has created a clothing line to honor the industry and how far it’s come.

“The fashion trend in general is about retro and vintage…. You can see it at any show you go to. At the same time, what you’re seeing is this recognition of the legalization of cannabis,” says Larry Linietsky, COO of High Times. “It’s a way to support the movement by wearing the clothing. We think it’s well-timed. [It’s] vintage, counterculture and authentic.”

They may have been the first weed dealers.

The following is excerpted from the newsletter WeedWeek. Get your free and confidential subscription at WeedWeek.net.

Evidence suggests that Bronze Age Yamnaya tribespeople established a cannabis trade between Europe and Asia 5,000 years ago. Native to the Caucasus Mountains (roughly), the Yamnaya were horse-riding, cattle-herding nomads who traveled along what later became the Silk Road.

While neighbors Indonesia and the Philippines escalate their wars on drugs, Thailand may reform its famously harsh laws.

Can you find weed growing in the wild? Green Rush Daily investigates.

The Cannabist interviews joint rolling artist Tony Greenhand.

Eugene Monroe, who got cut from the Baltimore Ravens this year after he became the first active NFL player to call for MED use, has retired from the league. He’s one of jocks included on the Men’s Journal list of 18 cannabis activists in sports. The only woman is mixed martial artist Ronda Rousey. Earlier this year The New Yorker discussed “ The athlete’s case for cannabis.”

Tabloid stories about the dangers of drugs appear to fuel greater drug use. Gatherings where everyone stays sober are becoming trendy.

Agneya Singh, director of “ M Cream,” a movie billed as Bollywood’s first stoner flick, says India should decriminalize.

This weekend’s Enchanted Forest Gathering, a rave in northern California, was among the first U.S. festivals to have a MED dispensary on site. Alcohol was not sold.

Clothing company Patagonia, has made a short film ”Harvesting Liberty” to support industrial hemp legalization.

Michael “Dooma” Wendschuh, the central figure in my story “ Ebbu and the rise and fall of a modern weed dealer” has a new cannabis company. According to its LinkedIn page, Toronto-based Province Brands is a “global luxury brand” creating products “which do not feel like marijuana products.”

Some schoolchildren in the U.K. are gardening with cannabis compost.

Kríttik’l Kápchər/Flickr


For over two hundred years, farmers in the state of Connecticut legally grew and harvested hemp for use in sails, ropes, and clothing. In fact, the value of hemp in colonial-era Connecticut was so high that it was actually illegal for farmers to not grow hemp. That sentiment continued all the way through World War II, when the U.S. government was distributing propaganda films urging farmers to plant hemp crops for the good of the nation.
In the 1950’s however, the hemp plant got caught up in the misguided reefer madness over marijuana, and has not been grown in Connecticut ever since.
But as cannabis acceptance grows in the state, so too does the demand for the right to grow the incredibly useful and perpetually renewable resource of hemp.

Photo by Timothy Norris.

Now that the era of cannabis prohibition is finally coming to a close, the famous stoners of bygone eras are stepping away from their bongs, wandering out of their man caves and looking to cash in. Bob Marley’s descendants may be trying to brand a strain of weed named after the famed reggae singer, but L.A.’s own Tommy Chong is thinking a big more broadly.
Yes, his own strain — “Chong Star” — is in the works. But more importantly, the 76-year-old is making a play for a lucrative comeback with a recent stint on the hit show Dancing With the Stars and endorsements of everything from fertilizer and joint-rolling machines to pipe necklaces and Smoke Swipes, a product that supposedly removes unwanted smells from clothing and hair. Amanda Lewis at the LA Weekly has more.

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