Search Results: collective (481)

About six months ago, a Reddit user posted a photo of a sign pretending to peddle fake CBD-infused firewood. The Internet reacted as you’d expect, shaking a collective fist and rabble-rousing over something that was clearly intended as funny commentary concerning exactly what the Reddit readers thought they were mad about: CBD is being used and abused.

Even if the Internet’s anger was misplaced (big surprise) and we haven’t reached the point of CBD-infused firewood yet — that we know of — there’s no dearth of dumb cash grabs by companies slapping some CBD on it. Earlier this year, we spotted a hot dog stand (at the Cherry Creek Arts Festival, of all places) advertising franks infused with 5 milligrams of the stuff. Carl’s Jr. did something similar as a 4/20 stunt in Denver, adding a whopping 4.2 milligrams into a special sauce for a special burger.

Colorado law enforcement officers, district attorneys and federal authorities collaborated on what they describe as the largest collective marijuana bust in the state’s history.

During a press conference on May 24, Jason Dunn, the U.S. Attorney for the District of Colorado, discussed the two-year investigation that included nearly 250 location searches in eight counties across the state and led to 42 arrests after raids over the last three days.

The City of Denver’s marijuana conviction expungement program is online and ready to roll, according to the mayor’s office as well as the district and city attorneys, who collectively announced the news today, January 9.

Dubbed “Turn Over a New Leaf,” the campaign took a year and multiple city departments to implement and aims to dismiss and expunge thousands of convictions for marijuana crimes that are no longer illegal as of 2012, when Coloradans approved recreational marijuana.

A collective effort by several marijuana business groups could help bring social pot use to Colorado dispensaries, hotels, music venues and dozens of other types of businesses — if the concept makes it through the state legislature.

Marijuana industry lobbyists, tourism companies, lounge owners and dispensary representatives are planning to submit a marijuana hospitality bill to lawmakers that will propose creating two new business licenses that would allow social marijuana use in a manner similar to alcohol use.

Denver could get the nation’s first legal pot-infused music venue, and it’d come with one helluva house band. A group working with alternative-rock star Dean Ween says that it will apply for a social cannabis consumption permit in Denver, which would be the first of its kind if approved.

Backers of Dean Ween’s Honey Pot Lounge spoke of their plans at a Denver City Council meeting regarding the city’s social consumption licensing program on Monday, November 19. They plan to apply within a month in hopes of licensing a pot-infused music venue at the Circus Collective, an alternative fitness and training center at 2041 Lawrence Street in the Ballpark neighborhood.

April 4, 2016, was a big day for Matt Hobson — and it was very nearly a big day for Colorado’s cannabis industry.

That was the day that 29-year-old Hobson and other employees at Pueblo West Organics, a medical and recreational marijuana dispensary in Pueblo West, a municipal district just outside of Pueblo, presented their manager with a request for collective bargaining at their morning staff meeting.

Entrepreneurs and consumers have been holding their collective breath as California readies itself for retail cannabis sales, which that state’s voters approved in November 2016. California expects to have regulations and license programs in place for retail cannabis businesses by early next year, although the exact date that stores will open is still unknown.

Despite the lack of retail presence, California’s medical marijuana industry is spurring one of the largest legal pot markets in the country, medical or recreational. Several cannabis industry studies have shown that California’s market is already larger than in Colorado or Washington, which both opened retail pot businesses in 2014. And even though they’re in a medical-only market, California’s cannabis consumers already display strong similarities to their Colorado counterparts, according to data from BDS Analytics – but on the recreational side.

In a proposal that was widely panned by pot shops and legalization advocates, the city in June revealed possible regulations for Los Angeles cannabis businesses that would have continued the problematic policy of treating even the most legit enterprises with “limited legal immunity.”

Many cannabis folks were up in arms. Voters in March approved Proposition M, which was pitched as an initiative that would finally grant licenses to weed sellers and producers. But the measure ultimately left the fine print up to City Hall. The groups representing collectives in town opposed the limited-immunity approach in proposed regulations forwarded as a way to implement M. This week, City Council president Herb Wesson submitted additions to those regulations that would endorse full licenses for pot businesses.

Colorado’s cannabis industry has been holding its collective breath ever since President Donald Trump nominated Jeff Sessions for attorney general. And since he was sworn in, Sessions, a proponent of the war on drugs, hasn’t been shy about saying that marijuana should remain illegal federally.

In a proactive move, on April 3 the governors of four states with recreational cannabis businesses up and running at the time — Alaska, Colorado, Oregon and Washington — sent a letter to Sessions and Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, urging that federal officials “engage with us before embarking on any changes to regulatory and enforcement systems.”

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