Search Results: confiscated (112)

Here’s a lesson for you: if you want to get away with marijuana posesion, be a cop.
A Richmond, California police officer busted with about five pounds of pot he picked up at a UPS store won’t face any charges, even though he failed to follow even the most basic protocol.
K-9 Cop Joe Avila picked up the pot at the UPS store on Nov. 25 and radioed in to dispatch that he was going to file an incident report. He never did that, though. Instead, he took the pot home with him instead of to a station to lock up as evidence. It’s not the first time Avila hasn’t written a report, either. In fact, it’s his complete lack of competency and failure to write reports for more than 36 incidents that led to his bust.

Wikipedia commons.
Meadow Lane stadium.

The oldest soccer club in the world apparently has some problems growing grass (the legal kind) on their field during the winter.
League One Notts County F.C. was founded in 1862 and has been playing at the Meadow Lane stadium since 1910. Apparently, the technology at the stadium isn’t very new either and keeping the pitch green has been a challenge for some time.

Singapore executed Chijioke Stephen Obioha by hanging. A Nigerian national and football player, Obioha was found with 2.5 kg (5.5 pounds) of marijuana in 2007. According to Singapore law, anyone with more than 500 g is presumed to be trafficking.

Philippine president Rodrigo Duterte, known as “The Punisher” for his advocacy of vigilante murders,threatened his human rights activist critics.

A Florida county sheriff’s office may have trained drug sniffing dogs with material other than drugs, according to ProPublica. Another ProPublica report led Portland, Ore. to change its policy for the drug tests used in many arrests.

The U.S. Supreme Court won’t take up the case of a Native American church in Hawaii that wants to be exempt for marijuana laws.

A college student who had $11,000 confiscated at the Cincinnati airport after his checked bag smelled of pot, challenged the forfeiture and got his money back.

Seantrel Henderson, a Buffalo Bills offensive lineman, may sue the NFL over his second cannabis suspension of the season. Henderson’s Crohn’s disease forced him to have two and a half feet of his colon removed.

The Bay Area has the country’s highest concentration of cannabis users in the country.

My friend Reilly Capps wrote a story for The Rooster about “ Stoners anonymous.

A survey found that cannabis is attracting an increasingly upscale clientele.

Anita Thompson, widow of Hunter S. Thompson, wants to market the gonzo journalist’s personal cannabis strains. Skepticism abounds.

The founder of Healing Church, a Catholicism-inflected pot “ministry” in Rhode Island, is involved in abizarre legal situation. If I’m reading this correctly, Anne Armstrong had a vision of cannabis leaves on a six-foot replica of the Virgin of Guadeloupe – an image said to have appeared on a Mexican peasant’s poncho in 1531. Armstrong later obtained and then lost custody of the replica. She also faces a possession charge.

The Stranger put together a cannabis gift guide. It includes weed filled advent calendars and Christmas ornaments. The piece also cites scripture to prove Jesus was a stoner.

Country music legend Loretta Lynn smoked pot for the first time at 84, for her glaucoma. She didn’t like it, but defended Willie Nelson and the right to do it.

A woman in Greensboro, N.C., was “shocked,” in a bad way, when someone mistakenly mailed her four pounds of weed.

Earlier this year, High Times announced that it would move its annual Cannabis Cup to Pueblo after it was forced to relocate the event from Denver. And while the plan subsequently fell apart (and the Cup headed to California, at least temporarily), the idea of the Cup in Pueblo made sense since the community has been viewed as one of the more marijuana-friendly in Colorado.

But that reputation appears to be changing in a big way.

The number of busts aimed at allegedly illegal marijuana growshas skyrocketed in the city, with another one taking place this week. Since mid-March, the Pueblo County Sheriff’s Office has reportedly confiscated 5,900 marijuana plans and arrested 35 people in 25 homes.

Meanwhile, the PCSO has announced the breakup of a drug-trafficking operation with alleged links to a Mexican cartel — the conclusion of a months-long investigation that led to multiple seizures of methamphetamine, plus cocaine and heroin.

“People in the state of California unfortunately have to be aware of the inherent risk that the feds may come in and shut you down.” – Nathan Shaman, CA-based Attorney


Earlier this year, 25-year old Zack Curcie was at work as a gardener on a 10-acre parcel of land being used to cultivate medical marijuana in the foothills of southern California.
Though the grow site was legal under California state law, and the people behind it went to great lengths to follow the state’s 18-year old pot laws as best they could, on September 24th Curcie, an Iraq War vet, found out what it is like to be on the other side of a military-style raid as aggressive San Diego-based Narcotics Task Force (NTF) agents stormed the property with weapons raised.

Two of the three 30lb parcels of pot that showed up at City Blue this week

Founded on 13th and market Street in downtown Philadelphia in 1981, the high styled retail outlet City Blue now has 25 locations across Pennsylvania, Delaware, New Jersey, and Ohio.
Touting themselves as “a leader and innovator in urban fashion”, managers in all City Blue locations are likely very busy these days ordering in new items to be sure that their shelves are fully stocked for the holiday rush. With so many packages in transit during this time of year, mistakes certainly do happen, but when the manager of the City Blue store in Upper Darby, PA sliced into an unknown package delivered to his store earlier this week, he was greeted by a box full of product that he simply could not sell…at least, not legally.

Back in June of 2013, local law enforcement officers in Junction City, Kansas stopped a 2002 GMC Sierra pickup truck for speeding.
Approaching the vehicle, the officers noted that the bed of the truck was full of junk and debris, including an old fridge. But once they identified the elderly driver behind the wheel, they quickly realized that there might be more to the old rambling man than meets the eye.

The DEA assumed a suspect’s Facebook profile in an attempt to lure her friends into admissions of guilt


Ever since Notre Dame University star football player Manti Te’o was caught up in a lie about a relationship with a girl who never existed, the word “catfished” has become more and more of a household term.
There was a movie in 2010 by the name of Catfish, which spawned the MTV show of the same name, which has somehow made it through three seasons on the culturally bankrupt cable television station. Even the Urban Dictionary has the phrase listed, defining it as: “Being deceived over Facebook as the deceiver professed their romantic feelings to his/her victim, but isn’t who they say they are.”
Well, it turns out that the DEA may be the hipsters of catfishing online, since they’ve been doing it since way before the mainstream caught on. But a new lawsuit by an admitted drug dealer may cause your Facebook “Friends” list to get pared down a bit.

Bobby Earle
Deborah & Dennis Little had their home raided in 2012, now they’re fighting back


Two years ago, in September of 2012, a law enforcement helicopter buzzed over the top of Dennis Little’s land in the quiet country town of Ramona, California. One month later, a joint task force comprised of local law enforcement officers and DEA agents kicked down Mr. Little’s door and arrested him and his wife on suspicion of cultivating illegal amounts of marijuana.
In March of 2013, San Diego District Attorney Bonnie Dumanis took them to court on the charges, and one full year later, in March of this year, they beat her at her own game and were fully acquitted of all charges by a jury of their peers.
With two years of their lives turned upside down, thousands of dollars lost to lawyers and courts, and a hard reputation to shake in a small town, one might think that the Little’s would be happy to put it all behind them. But they have some justice of their own to attend to first.

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