Search Results: confiscated (112)

Jack Daniel.

In 1996, California voters legalized medical marijuana for qualified patients and caregivers. Nearly two decades have passed, and the city of San Diego has yet to enact an ordinance which would regulate medical marijuana dispensaries, and provide the guidelines by which they could legally open.

In nearly four hours of testimonies
given by dozens of San Diego citizens on Monday, the eight sitting City Council members heard arguments given both in favor of, and against, Mayor Bob Filner’s new proposed ordinance to allow for the legal and regulated re-opening of medical marijuana dispensaries in America’s Finest City.

Wikipedia commons.

With April 20th, or 4/20, falling on a Saturday this year, the annual pot smokers’ holiday saw events, festivals, and concerts crop up in cities and states across the country in celebration of all things cannabis.
With a recent Pew Research Center poll showing a 52% majority of Americans polled being in favor of legalizing pot, and with new medical marijuana legalization bills underway in ten states, a lot of critical eyes were on the weed scene this past weekend.

Cannabis users across the state of Washington sparked up to celebrate the passage of Initiative 502 last year, which legalized the personal use and possession of up to one ounce of marijuana for anyone over the age of 21. I-502 still prohibits the consumption of marijuana in public places, and driving under the influence of marijuana, but along with the state of Colorado, Washington seems poised to blaze a new trail for marijuana legalization.

TokeoftheTown.com
Artist rendition of weed cannon.

It’s almost something out of an old Wile E. Coyote cartoon. But unlike Acme cannons this one worked, and it was launching cannabis instead of a cartoon carnivore. The Mexicali Public Safety Department Tuesday say they confiscated a pneumatic gun used to shoot bales of herb and other drugs into the United States.
And they’ve been doing it for some time.

Dr. Dennis Clark is a 40-year physician in private practice and longtime resident of Long Beach, CA but on April 12, 2012, he got no respect from OCSD. Deputy Michael Thalken and five other deputies raided Clark’s home and allegedly told him to “shut up and sit down” when he asked to see if his name was on the warrant. During a two-hour search, the officers confiscated the doctor’s laptop containing patient information, copies of his tax returns and his 2011 Hyundai Sonata, and they questioned him about his views on medical marijuana.
Last November, Clark sued OCSD and Thalken at the Ronald Reagan Federal Courthouse, claiming that the deputies violated his constitutional rights. According to Clark, deputies obtained the search warrant by tricking Superior Court Judge Andre Manssourian, a former prosecutor, into granting the raid. It’s true that Thalken failed to tell Manssourian the home belonged to a licensed physician or that there was no evidence the doctor violated any state law. OC Weekly has the full story.

Free Chris Williams/Facebook
Chris Williams faces a mandatory minimum sentence of more than 90 years in federal prison

Courageous Caregiver Refuses Constitutional ‘Compromise’
By Kari Boiter
“I have decided to fight the federal government because for me, not defending the things that I know are right is dishonorable,” writes Chris Williams from his cell at Crossroads Correctional Center, a for-profit prison in Shelby, Montana. “Every citizen has a responsibility to fight for what is right, even if it seems like the struggle will be lost.”
 
Williams’ words are particularly poignant. As he writes from prison, he faces the near-certainty that he will spend the rest of his life locked away in an industrial-size cage. His crime? Providing medical marijuana to terminally ill and disabled patients authorized to use cannabis under Montana law. 
Williams co-owned Montana Cannabis, along with Tom Daubert, Chris Lindsey and Richard Flor. Daubert was a lobbyist who helped write Montana’s medical marijuana law; Lindsey was a former public defender; Flor was the first registered caregiver in Montana; and Williams was the consummate farmer. Together, these men established a “gold standard” for strict compliance with Montana law. 

Sharon Letts
Dr. Marion Fry believes that cannabis is good medicine, and that God will save her.

Exclusive Prison Interview:
Dr. Mollie Fry
Story and Photos
by Sharon Letts
It’s been one year and five months since Dr. Marion “Mollie” Fry and her husband, Civil Attorney, Dale Schafer, surrendered to Federal prison for manufacturing and distributing Medical Cannabis in California.
More than six years of litigation and three years of appeals rendered “no defense,” insuring mandatory five year Federal prison terms, respectively.
In 2001 the Fry/Schafer family home located in the hills just north of Sacramento was raided by Federal authority under then President George W. Bush, Jr. during the failed “War on Drugs.” 
Thirty-four plants were confiscated – 20 were infested with spider mites, sitting near a compost pile. 
44 Plants in a Pile
According to Schafer, the couple had never grown more than 44 plants in a given year – well below the 99 plant limit set forth by the State of California for medical use – and never sold a leaf.

City of Carrollton, Texas
Carrollton Police Officer Jeremy Sanchez, left, and K-9 “Bosko”: A Texas court accepted police claims that Bosko smelled marijuana on money, under a bed, in a gym bag, in a back room of the house — from under the garage door

Fort Worth, Texas attorney David Sloane occasionally happens across appellate cases where the court’s blind acceptance of the police account of events surrounding a marijuana arrest is astounding — even for a seasoned trial lawyer like himself. A case from Dallas suburb Carrollton certainly fits this description, according to Sloane.

In $27,877.00 Current Money of the United States v. The State of Texas, an asset forfeiture case, the Carrollton Police Department alleged their dog “Bosko” was able to “sniff” and “alert” — from under a garage door — on the mere scent of marijuana on currency concealed in a gym bag under a bed in a back room of the defendant’s parent’s home.
The trial court accepted this, and the appellate court agreed!
1 2 3 4 5 12