Search Results: cooking (65)

Love, romance and smoke were in the air for the Simply Cooking class with Scott Durrah.Lindsey Bartlett

Love, romance and smoke were in the air for the Simply Cooking class with Scott Durrah.

Longtime chef Scott Durrah has a strong restaurant personality — and a strong tolerance for cannabis. He showed off both at last Saturday’s Simply Cooking demonstration that combined his love of food with his love of cannabis — and his love for partner Wanda James, with whom he runs Jezebel’s Southern Bistro as well as theirdispensary, Simply Pure. The theme of the day’s cooking demonstration was love and romance — and the pop-up kitchen definitely got hot.

Durrah prepared two dishes that morning: pan-seared scallops salad with grapefruit and cannabis-infused olive oil, and a lamb chop preparation that incorporated his homemade cannabis-infused coconut oil, mint tincture as a mint sauce, bok choy and brown rice. Pro tip: Store your cannabis-infused coconut oil in a hollowed-out coconut. Not only does it improve the flavor, Durrah says, but “It just looks so cool.”


This is exactly what marijuana cooking needed: a 91-year-old Italian grandmother that knows how to throw down in the kitchen teaching her skills to the masses via the internet.
For what it’s worth, Aurora Leveroni, star of Vice’s “Munchies” series doesn’t partake in the pot she cooks — but she knows it can help and wants to share her love of healing through food with the world.

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Medicated Chef/Facebook

Online voting has started for what is being called the first worldwide cannabis cooking contest, the 2013 Medicated Chef Contest, hosted by iBAKE TV.

Contest videos will stay up on YouTube at www.youtube.com/medicatedchefcontest until January 10. The top three videos with the most YouTube “Likes” will joint contestants Slick Chef of Nebraska and Trang Ngo of Denver on Saturday, February 16, at the contest finale in Denver at The Oriental Theater.
All of the final videos from contestants are uploaded and are live for voting. The videos will stay online until January 10 at 11:59 p.m. Mountain Time. The top three videos, as measured by YouTube “Likes,” will compete in an “Iron Chef”-style contest.

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Your Expert Nation
Greg Mowery: “As someone who’s eaten plenty of pot-laced brownies, pot tastes awful”

Now that marijuana’s entering the mainstream, we get pot culture articles even from right-wing propaganda factories like Fox News. A culinary expert offers his negative opinions of marijuana’s taste in the latest cannabis coverage from Fox.

“StoveTop Readings” blogger and cookbook publicist Greg Mowery, Fox News tells us, has “worked with the country’s top cookbook authors and chefs for 25 years,” and in his opinion, pot is bitter, acrid and unpalatable Nothing in the taste of marijuana, according to Mowery, makes food taste better.

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Graphic: Cafe Press

​Law enforcement in some Washington towns still haven’t really come to terms with the state’s medical marijuana law. Voters almost 13 years ago approved the initiative legalizing medicinal use of cannabis, but that doesn’t seem to be long enough for some localities to get the idea.

Case in point: Medical marijuana patient Forrest Amos, whose cannabis and cannabis-infused cooking oil were seized by police in Centralia, Washington last month, reports Adam Pearson at the Lewis County Chronicle.
Amos said he was told by Police Chief Bob Berg and Lewis County Prosecutor Jonathan Meyer that the cup of cooking oil was being tested and weighed to determine if it exceeded his authorized possession limit of 24 ounces of dried marijuana.

About 20 people showed up to voice support for Amos at the Centralia City Council meeting on Tuesday night. Although the City Council did not address Amos’s complaint of police harassment, it did agree to send a $400 damage claim he filed on January 24 to the city’s insurance pool to reimbursement him for his marijuana.
01252019_bruce_cbd_peanut_butter_0066Kenzie Bruce

Cooking with cannabis has never been more mainstream, and it’s no longer limited to just THC. You can infuse food with CBD in the same way, and the cannabinoid’s accessibility and lack of psychoactive effects have made this a popular option.

Anyone who’s made edibles before knows that high fat content is key for maximum cannabinoid infusion, as cannabinoids bind to fat cells. One of the easiest, fattiest foods for creating edibles is peanut butter (or almond butter, cashew butter or sunflower seed butter, if you’re allergic to peanuts). It infuses quickly, and unlike butter or vegetable oil, can be added to foods without further cooking.

veganillegalCourtesy of Illegal Burger

A Denver burger company is about to help you get a dose of cannabis with your lunch.

West Coast Ventures Group Corp., the parent company of Illegal Burger, which has two Denver locations (as well as outposts in Evergreen, Glendale and Arvada), has teamed up with a California company named Biolog, Inc., to test out a method of infusing cannabinoids directly into food.

The product they’ll be using is called CannaStix, a solid spice pack containing cannabis extracts that can be inserted into food — ground beef, for example — before cooking. The CannaStix pack liquefies and spreads its goodness into the food being cooked, giving it what the company describes as “a very accurate dose of fast onset, highly bioavailable cannabinoids.”

simply_cooking_lindsey_bartlett_01_Lindsey Bartlett

Once a rare treat, cannabis-infused edibles ain’t no longer a thang here in Colorado. In fact, they’re a large and growing presence in the legal pot industry, now accounting for around 15 percent of the recreational market share…and that’s still rising, according to several industry studies. Infused-product companies are using tasteless distillate, isolates and water-infusing powders to cook with cannabis, making the possibilities virtually limitless.

Today you can find anything from coffee to beef jerky and Dutch stroopwafels infused with THC and CBD on dispensary shelves in Colorado, and making pot-infused dishes at home has never been more popular. So what’s still sexy about old-school edibles, such as chocolates? We asked Lauren Gockley, chef for award-winning edibles company Coda Signature, about the evolving art of cooking with cannabinoids.

qweeeeeedLindsey Bartlett

The Marijuana Industry Group has helped the Colorado cannabis business develop into an awesome revenue machine that generates sales measured in the billions. But behind the scenes, MIG is embroiled in dueling Denver District Court lawsuits that pit the organization against Michael Elliott, its former executive director, in a fight that’s witheringly nasty.

Elliot’s complaint maintains that he was fired from his gig in June 2016 due largely to fallout from his rejection of sexual advances from a contract employee with the group. A few months later, he filed discrimination charges against the group with the Colorado Civil Rights Division — a prerequisite to a lawsuit, which was eventually filed in September 2017. But by then, MIG had already sued Elliott, arguing that he’d been sacked for misappropriating funds, among other things, and later retaliated by cooking up a fictional sexual harassment story that he then used in an unsuccessful effort to extort as much as $300,000.

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