Search Results: cultivation (693)

Growing cannabis at home is legal in Colorado, but some of the weed we’ve seen harvested from basements should be outlawed. Seeds, pests, mold and larf are all common challenges faced by inexperienced cultivators, and can result in poor smell and taste, as well as waste a lot of time and money most of us don’t have.

Tyler Morley and Jeremy Deale, two commercial cannabis cultivators in Colorado, believe they’ve created an online cannabis curriculum, the Chronic Method, that will help home growers avoid those costly, buzz-killing issues. Similar to the Three a Light method, the course gives growers step-by-step instructions from seed to harvest, and the duo makes pretty bold claims on the strategy’s success rate.

We recently sat down with Morley and Deale to learn more about the Chronic Method, and how growers can maximize their yields.

Next year’s Harvest promises to be quite a bounty.

Harvest of Arizona, the Tempe-based medical-marijuana dispensary company with retail shops in Tempe and Scottsdale, announced a merger Tuesday that would make it one of the largest players in the growing industry.

In theory, the deal could benefit to the state’s 115,000 registered patients by lowering prices.

Harvest has merged with Arizona cultivator Modern Flower, currently the state’s “leading wholesale supplier,” the company said in a news release, adding that the company will soon become “the largest medical marijuana operator in Arizona.” Phoenix New Times has the story…

With the looming November 2 vote on Amendment 2, which would expand medical marijuana in Florida for specific diseases and conditions, one thing is clear: Weed is a polarizing topic. As New Times reported in August, according to one of the most respected marijuana-usage surveys in America, roughly half the residents in Miami-Dade and Monroe Counties think smoking weed once a month is “harmful” and should be avoided. The other half rallied for legalization in our Facebook comments.

Although voters disagree, businesses are preparing for a yes vote on Amendment 2. Surterra Therapeutics, a hybrid company, works hand-in-hand with longtime Homestead nursery Alpha Foliage. (Disclosure: Reporter Stacey Russell is related to Surterra’s director of public relations.) Together with Alpha, Surterra cultivates, extracts, packages, markets, and dispenses medical marijuana. (Surterra cannot distribute medical cannabis without a nursery partner because of Florida law.) It’s one of just two dispensaries authorized by the state. Surterra is based in Georgia, but because of the legalization of medical marijuana in Florida, the company has set up camp in Tampa and Tallahassee. New Times toured the Tallahassee cultivation center.


Barbara Hoppe, council member from Columbia’s Sixth Ward, introduced legislation earlier this year that would allow people to grow up to six plants at home. Those without a medical recommendation from a doctor would face a $250 fine and the confiscation of their plants if busted. Medical patients wouldn’t face any penalties. That plan saw a lot of scrutiny, so Hoppe has rewritten her bill.
Her new plan, introduced this week and set for a hearing at the October 20 council meeting, allows for only two plants to be grown in a locked area and would allow medical patients to designate growing to a caregiver.

Arlin Trout.


When Arlin Troutt was sentenced in February 1996 for a marijuana-selling conspiracy, a crowd of supporters came to the Minneapolis federal courtroom to cheer him on.
The Arizona resident and former frontman for a line of hempwear affiliated with country singer Willie Nelson had been convicted of conspiring to transport and sell about 250 pounds of marijuana. Then 46, Troutt railed against the government’s anti-marijuana policies to the judge, extolling the plant’s value as “food, fuel, fiber, and medicine.”
His lawyer told the press the speech probably added 19 months to Troutt’s sentence of eight years, one month. Troutt, now 64 and living in Gold Canyon, is still fighting the Man in the name of cannabis. He vows to appeal an administrative law judge’s August 12 ruling that upholds a state rule prohibiting medical-marijuana patients from growing marijuana within 25 miles of a dispensary.

Keith Bacongo-Flickr edited by Toke of the Town.


Washington D.C. voters will have the chance to legalize limited amounts of cannabis for recreational use for adults 21 and up this November. The D.C. board of elections today announced that a measure legalizing up to two ounces of pot as well as limited home cultivation will be up to voters.

Flickr Commons
Homegrown Lemon Kush


Stretching from the eastern edge of Los Angeles County, all the way to the western Arizona border, Riverside County in California’s Inland Empire has been rapidly rising in the ranks of the most populous counties in the entire nation.
In an almost synchronized timeline of events, the population explosion in Riverside County coincided with the massive growth of medical marijuana demand in the region, and local growers soon found the Mediterranean-esque climate to be more than adequate for growing their own crops. However, a newly proposed county-wide ordinance would put an outright ban on outdoor cultivation of cannabis.

Jason Andrews.


Jason Andrews, the outspoken marijuana activist whose previous pot case led to a hung jury, is behind bars awaiting trial for a brand new marijuana caper.
As the Weekly previously reported, Orange County sheriff’s detectives followed Andrews from a Lake Forest pot dispensary in Oct. 2010 and busted him with two 8-ounce sacks of marijuana, as well as $5,800 in cash. Prosecutors charged him with possession of marijuana with the intent to sell. Andrews refused to accept a plea agreement; his case went to trial. A lone juror refused to find him guilty, citing the fact that Andrews had a state-issued medical marijuana card allowing him to possess and cultivate the plant.

Medical marijuana patients in Fresno County, Calif. are not happy with a recent decision by the county’s board of supervisors. They banned all marijuana cultivation in the county’s unincorporated areas with a unanimous 5-0 vote on Tuesday.
The public nuisance ordinance will take effect next month, and will make Fresno County the first county to ban cultivation since medical marijuana was legalized in 1996 with Proposition 215. It will be upheld with fines of $1,000 per plant and an additional $100 per day for each plant that is not removed.

Eighteen Wisconsin lawmakers have signed on to a medical marijuana bill introduced yesterday, raising the hopes of medical marijuana activists in the Badger state.
State Rep. Chris Taylor and state Sen. Jon Erpenbach were joined by 16 other lawmakers introduced Senate Bill 363, which would allow medical marijuana patients to and grow their own supply up to twelve plants and keep up to three ounces of herb on them at a time.

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