Search Results: demonstration (45)

For legal cannabis to spread across the country, people need to speak up in more ways than with Facebook comments and on Gallup polls. Lucky for cannabis users, Wanda James can be loud enough for all of us. The pot entrepreneur and activist was the first black woman to open a dispensary in Colorado, and was honored with a lifetime achievement award at the 2017 Cannabis Business Awards for her role in the commercial rise of the plant.

But even with all her success in pushing cannabis forward, James still has an ax to grind with state regulators and corporate interests. She’s frequently at government hearings speaking up for consumers’ rights, social consumption and fair pot policy, and is a regular presence at public demonstrations criticizing law enforcement or elected officials for anti-cannabis actions. Westword recently caught up with James to see what she’s been up to.

Dezy Saint-Nolde, better known by her activism name, Queen Phoenix, has emerged as a prominent organizer of protests and demonstrations in recent months. These included the thousands-strong November 10 protest against Donald Trump’s election, the February 18 Defend our Constitution march, a health-care rally on February 25, and a Demand Russia-Trump Ties Investigation march on March 18.

But Phoenix also believes that her activism made her the target of an undercover Denver Police Department investigation in which she was arrested and charged for offenses related to marijuana.

In a January cover story in Westword concerning DPD’s social-media surveillance and how it related to the department’s old “Spy Files” program, Phoenix shared her experience of having her house raided by cops in December on charges that she was distributing marijuana without a license.

Love, romance and smoke were in the air for the Simply Cooking class with Scott Durrah.

Longtime chef Scott Durrah has a strong restaurant personality — and a strong tolerance for cannabis. He showed off both at last Saturday’s Simply Cooking demonstration that combined his love of food with his love of cannabis — and his love for partner Wanda James, with whom he runs Jezebel’s Southern Bistro as well as theirdispensary, Simply Pure. The theme of the day’s cooking demonstration was love and romance — and the pop-up kitchen definitely got hot.

Durrah prepared two dishes that morning: pan-seared scallops salad with grapefruit and cannabis-infused olive oil, and a lamb chop preparation that incorporated his homemade cannabis-infused coconut oil, mint tincture as a mint sauce, bok choy and brown rice. Pro tip: Store your cannabis-infused coconut oil in a hollowed-out coconut. Not only does it improve the flavor, Durrah says, but “It just looks so cool.”

Dallasboy/WikiCommons.

Until the very end, last Tuesday night’s demonstration in Dallas against the grand jury’s decision in the Ferguson case was uneventful. Marchers congregated at Dallas Police Department headquarters in the Cedars then walked through downtown to protest the grand jury’s decision not to indict Ferguson, Missouri, police officer Darren Wilson for killing unarmed teenager Mike Brown.
“Tonight I’m somewhat numb, but I’m also saddened,” Michael Bowie Jr., new senior pastor of St. Luke Community United Methodist Church in Dallas told The Dallas Morning News at the protest. “First it was Trayvon [Martin], now it’s Michael Brown. And it’s sad that killing of black males is justified and legal.”


Life’s a beach, and then you’re high. This was perhaps the credo of a group of young New York City lifeguards who were busted smoking weed over the Independence Day holiday while they sat in a car during their lunch break.
Reports indicate that six city beach attendants had apparently gone off on a Fourth of July safety meeting when a nosey officer with the New York City Police Department swooped in and caught them giving a demonstration on how to resuscitate a drowning joint – just in case it gets fish lipped, we suppose.


Demonstrators descended on the state capitol rotunda Wednesday thrusting fists and signs into the air with chants of “yes, we cannabis!”
For two hours, the hallways echoed with the voices of cops, writers, pols, and lawyers invited by Minnesota NORML, which lobbies for marijuana reform. They rubbed elbows with both jean jackets and blazers, showing the disparate makeup of a group that is often typecast and dismissed as burnouts.
“This movement is about people who like drugs, people who hate drugs, and people who just don’t give a damn about drugs,” says Neill Franklin, a former narcotics officer, from the podium. “It’s about everyone who is concerned about cannabis prohibition in the United States today.”
In the crowd, Grassroots Party founder Oliver Steinberg smiles when asked about how pot reform has gone mainstream. He attended his first demonstration back in the early 90s with some of the same people who showed up here.
“The only difference now are those cameras,” he says, pointing to the TV crews.
Read the entire story over at the Minneapolis City Pages.

USC/Retronaut.com

Retronaut.com is a seriously cool site for fans of quirky, odd historical photos as evidenced by these three strangely hysterical shots of cops and a scraggly little pot plant.
We don’t have much information on these photos, other than they are from the Van Nuys police department from 1951 and somehow wound up as part of the University of Southern California. Apparently someone sent a pot plant to the jail without any explanation and the cops had no idea what to do with it, or themselves.

Hemp advocate Jason Lauve has a new endeavor: Team Hemp House, the goal of which is to build a hemp demonstration house in Colorado. “The intent is to show that we can use hemp to build the foundation and the walls and the tiles, but also the furnishings in the house, including the food in the fridge,” says Lauve, who’s helped legalize the crop.
There’s a bigger goal, too, he adds: “The Team Hemp House project is the foundation that we need to get the whole industry excited and get it off the ground.” Denver Westword has the full story.

Gambling was legalized in Nevada in 1931, with the Sal Sagev Hotel becoming the state’s first legal casino. Fast forward 82 years, and quite a bit has changed, not just in Las Vegas, but across the state.
In the home of Sin City, it’s hard to imagine being the “first” to do anything. But last weekend, Robert Calkin and the California-based Cannabis Career Institute did just that, when they hosted nearly 70 students for Nevada’s first-ever medical marijuana school.

LAist

After a years-long demonstration of apparently bottomless ineptitude when it comes to effectively addressing safe access to medical marijuana for patients, the Los Angeles City Council on Tuesday repealed its own July dispensary ban with an 11 to 2 vote.

The action once again leaves L.A. with no laws regulating the city’s numerous dispensaries, but some council members were openly wishing for an expanded federal crackdown on the shops.

Tuesday’s vote followed years of attempts by the hapless council to regulate the medical marijuana dispensary scene in Los Angeles, with more than 400 dispensaries located in the L.A. metro area. The city claimed its own count revealed more than 1,000 such shops.
Council members said it was time to go back to the drawing board, saying they’d ask state legislators to “clarify” state law on how cities can regulate dispensaries.
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