Search Results: dry (128)

CannabisCulture/FlickrCommons


After spending five years in six different prisons across six different states, Canada’s Marc Emery has been scheduled for release and is due back in Canada between August 10th and the 25th.
He recently gave his first interview to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) since earning that release, and if authorities in either country thought he may just silently go about his business after being caged up with thieves and killers for a half a decade, they have sorely underestimated the self-proclaimed “Prince of Pot”.

REDDIT NAME…
The tiny confines of the Space Bucket.


Editor’s note: We realize the vast majority of marijuana users are living in places where growing cannabis is legal and people don’t have to hide. That in mind, we wanted to highlight a home-spun, stealth growing operation we thought was perfect for those of you who wanted to grow small amounts in places where cannabis cultivation is still frowned upon.
All you need to grow your own weed is a bucket and a dream. That’s the message behind “Space Buckets,” an innovative marijuana growing method designed with a tiny circular footprint. For about a hundred bucks, and a weeekend’s worth of work, you can build a microfarm that yields up to two ounces of herb at a time.

Freddie Alexander Smoke III.


A man with the unfortunately ironic last name of “Smoke” was arrested this week, charged with starting a wildfire near an illegal pot grow in Northern California that is forcing people from their homes.
Freddie Alexander Smoke was arrested over the weekend, accused of starting a fire after a spark from his truck exhaust set the dry grass near his illegal pot grow on fire. Smoke was also charged with illegal marijuana cultivation for the 180 plants investigators found on site.


Life’s a beach, and then you’re high. This was perhaps the credo of a group of young New York City lifeguards who were busted smoking weed over the Independence Day holiday while they sat in a car during their lunch break.
Reports indicate that six city beach attendants had apparently gone off on a Fourth of July safety meeting when a nosey officer with the New York City Police Department swooped in and caught them giving a demonstration on how to resuscitate a drowning joint – just in case it gets fish lipped, we suppose.


In January of this year, The Washington Post conducted a poll of Washington D.C. residents which found that 8 in 10 polled said they were in favor of either decriminalization, or straight up legalization, of weed in the nation’s capital.

In March, the City Council voted to decriminalize cannabis possession, knocking the punishment down from a year in jail, to a $25 fine. The District’s medical marijuana program is expanding, and much like in Colorado, none of these things are leading to the reefer madness we’ve been warned about for decades.
But with legalization talk being passed around the tightest circles in the nation’s capital, leave it to local Congressional Republicans to try to halt the inevitable progress of reform.


The exact cost of a marijuana raid in America is hard to put an accurate estimate on. The first, and most important, question is, “the cost to whom?” Besides their livelihood, their reputation in the community, and even one’s freedom, the financial costs of a marijuana raid can be overwhelming to the suspect – whether they are ultimately found guilty, or not.
As marijuana goes more mainstream, however, state and local law enforcement officials are looking to revise their own decades-old procedures when it comes to busting weed growers, before their own departments’ budgets get flipped upside down by pot cultivation cases gone bad.

Pat Arnow/Flickr.


The New York State Legislature has just more than three days to approve a bill that would legalize medical marijuana across the state, before the legislative session ends on Thursday, June 19. If it doesn’t pass–and it hasn’t passed the last sixteen times it has been introduced–it will be back to the drawing board.
Activists who have pushed to pass the bill, known as the Compassionate Care Act, remain stubbornly confident this will be the year–it is, after all, the furthest the bill has made it through the legislature since it was initially introduced in 1997. But Governor Andrew Cuomo is not bending over backwards to help move the legislation along. To the contrary, on Monday, Cuomo enumerated a laundry list of changes he wants to see implemented before he will support the bill to the Daily News.
The Village Voice has more of the local angle.

USDOJ


Update – 10:00 a.m. 5/21/2014: FBI Director James Comey has pulled a 180 today, announcing that he is in no way loosening the agency policy on marijuana use. Comey has indicated that his comments were a joke (an unfunny joke that basically stereotypes all young people and computer hackers as pot users). Comey retracted his comments today at a Senate Judiciary Committee meeting after being grilled by Alabama Republican Sen. Jeff Sessions.
“I am absolutely dead-set against using marijuana,” Comey said today. “I did not say that I am going to change that ban.” Original story below.

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