Search Results: electricity (47)

Forty-three-year-old Alex Sanchez spent just one night in jail last October after he was arrested for growing weed at his house in Kendall. When he returned home, the electricity wasn’t on. Sanchez called to figure out what was up and stumbled upon a little-known county ordinance that prevented him from taking a hot shower or cooking himself dinner unless he forked over what amounted to his life savings.

That day, Sanchez learned he was on the hook for thousands of dollars in fees, inspection costs, permits, repairs, and, eventually, once all of that was paid off and completed, a four-figure deposit payable to Florida Power & Light.

​​Indoor cannabis cultivation may be trendy, but it’s also costly. Marijuana grown inside accounts for one percent of the annual electricity use in the United States, according to a new study.

That’s $5 billion worth of energy, equivalent to the energy use of two million homes for a year, reports Ariel Schwartz at Fast Company. The news comes from a report by Evan Mills, a veteran energy analyst at Lawrence Berkeley National Labs, who said the problem can be traced back to the high-intensity lighting, dehumidification, air conditioning, irrigation, heating, and ventilation systems used in modern indoor grows.

Legal cannabis is growing fast. Since November 2012, when voters in Colorado and Washington approved legalizing the plant, seven more states followed suit, and two more have legalization measures on the ballot next month. And don’t forget Canada, where marijuana became officially legal in mid-October.

All that growth brings a growing demand for energy and other resources, however. Cannabis business analytics firm New Frontier Data recently released a report showing that electricity consumption by America’s pot industry will increase by 162 percent by 2020, with the industry currently consuming 1.1 million megawatt hours of electricity annually, or enough to power 92,500 homes for a year.

The cannabis industry’s thirst for energy has been well documented, with a majority of commercial cultivations burning electricity indoors because of local laws banning outdoor grows…and also because it’s easier to control growing environments indoors. With over 591 active cultivation licenses operating out of 295 locations in Denver, the city is a fitting host for the hundred-plus cannabis growers, energy consultants and waste experts attending the Cannabis Sustainability Symposium, a two-day conference geared towards increasing efficiency and sustainability in commercial pot.

KeoniCabral/FlickrCommons


In February of this year, local pro-cannabis activists in Kern County in Southern California concocted a defense of pot dispensaries that you have to be toking on some top shelf herbs to come up with.
Their argument was that by forcing the closure or re-location of the vast majority of local medical marijuana storefronts, they would be violating the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) by making the region’s cannabis consumers drive their pollution-spewing cars even further to get their medication.
Half-baked or not, the defense stood up in court and the de facto ban on medical marijuana in Kern County was delayed. As we reported at the time, the court’s decision set a potential landmark precedent for other counties or cities on the verge on instituting their own crackdowns on the chron. The example we used was San Diego, and sure enough, America’s Finest City has become the new proving ground.


As we predicted when we reported on San Diego’s restrictive new medical marijuana ordinance that was passed back in February of this year, pro-cannabis advocates in the city filed a lawsuit late last week to attempt to stop the new proposal in its tracks.
Earlier in the month of February, Toke of the Town reported that a California judge in Kern County had ruled in favor of cannabis activists who argued that a recently approved and highly restrictive ordinance had created a de facto ban on storefront medical marijuana dispensaries in the region.
Those activists then took it a step further, citing the California Environmental Quality Act, arguing that the new ordinance was literally making people drive too far to get their weed, in turn creating undue amounts of air pollution. Lo and behold, the judge bought it and the ban was lifted.

TexTexin/Flickr


Two former Los Angeles County Sherriff’s deputies were charged, booked, and released this week on $50,000 bail a piece, stemming from accusations that they had illegally planted firearms during an alleged bust at a southern California medical marijuana dispensary back in 2011.
Facing charges ranging from obstruction of justice and altering evidence, to perjury and filing false police reports, Julio Cesar Martinez (39) and Anthony Manuel Paez (32) are scheduled to be arraigned later this year, on June 17th. If convicted, they could face up to seven years in state prison.

Ryan Lackey/Flickr


After a “month-long” investigation that included stake-outs, digging through garbage, and comparing neighbors’ electricity bills, DEA agents and Shorewood (Illinois) Police kicked down the door of a suspected pot grower at 5am on October 11th, 2013.
The suspect was 46-year-old Angela Kirking, who says she awoke to 4 DEA agents and 5 cops screaming at her with guns drawn. Kirking does admit to being a proud grower … of Hibiscus flowers, which she actually eats. It was her search for all-organic solutions for that part of her diet that brought the wrath of the federal government and local law enforcement down on her door on that October morning.

Legend has it this was actually a poorly-run BHO extraction.

There was a whole lot of shaking going on in northwest Denver last Sunday, when an attempt to make hash oil exploded in a rental duplex in the 2900 block of Julian Street. Denver District Attorney Mitch Morrissey formally charged 40-year-old Jeff Garbarek, 39-year-old Steve Donnel and and 43-year-old Scott Mitchell with fourth-degree arson in connection with their cannabis-cooking incident; they are scheduled to appear in Denver County Court on April 9. In the meantime, hands off the butane! This was just the latest in a string of hash-oil disasters in the Mile High City; keep reading for our top six.

Wikimedia Commons


If, for some reason, you did not believe that there really is a War on Drugs underway in America, two top-ranking U.S. military generals admitted as much earlier this week in testimony before the Congressional House Armed Services Committee in Washington D.C.
Army General Charles Jacoby and Marine General John Kelly sat Tuesday before the pasty white panel of entitled U.S. Congressmen, begging the government’s purse-holders for a few more bucks, and warning that more budget cuts will translate directly into violent drug sales here at home.

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