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“Joe is a freshman legislator in a Republican-controlled house, so he’s got zero juice to get anything done.” So says John Morgan, an Orlando-based attorney and cannabis reform advocate.
The “Joe” he is referring to is Florida state congressman Joe Saunders (D- Orlando), who recently filed House Bill 859, which if passed, would skip right past the voters in Florida, making legal medical marijuana the law of the land.


Morgan, who has personally raised $4,000,000 in an effort to get a similar piece of legislation before Florida voters this November, calls Saunders’ plan nothing more than a publicity stunt.

VH1

​Twenty-five years after crack cocaine ravaged American cities, a new VH1 Rock Doc explores how the drug also transformed popular culture, especially hip-hop. The latest addition to the Emmy-winning franchise, “Planet Rock: The Story of Hip Hop and the Crack Generation” premieres Sunday, September 18 at 10 p.m. ET/PT on VH1.

Narrated and executive produced by Ice-T, “Planet Rock” is the first documentary to focus specifically on the connections between crack and hip-hop. Based primarily on the first-person accounts of four famous dealers turned rappers, the film also widens its lens at times to show how crack changed America culturally, socially and politically.

Photo: TMZ
“Charlie Sheen” weed will run you $70 an eighth, $400 an ounce at many Los Angeles dispensaries.

​Medical marijuana dispensaries in California are selling cannabis with the strain name “Charlie Sheen” in a tribute to the headline-grabbing star.

The Charlie Sheen marijuana, reportedly with a THC content of 23 percent, was flying off the shelves at several shops last week, reports TMZ.
Demand for the new strain was so high that growers were being asked to put in more crops to keep up with the demand, the celebrity website reported.
In a move that couldn’t have hurt sales of Charlie Sheen the marijuana strain, Charlie Sheen the actor defended his increasingly erratic behavior by saying last week, “I am on a drug. It’s called Charlie Sheen.”

A marijuana speakeasy is on the verge of opening in Denver.

At first, the Bodega sign offering color TVs, VCRs, blunts and joint papers looks like old-school homage to an East Coast corner market, with shelves of snacks, Latin food, piñatas and a random assortment of goods and electronics for sale inside. But while we couldn’t take pictures inside, trust that there’s more than just soft drinks behind the old Squirt soda machine on the wall: It’s actually a secret door leading to a glossy, marijuana-friendly lounge boasting booths, flatscreen TVs and a coffee bar.

Denver recently conducted random tests of more than two dozen local dispensaries to learn more about potential yeast and mold issues with marijuana, and the results weren’t good.

On August 19, the City of Denver sent a notice to every licensed marijuana dispensary in the city, warning that investigators would be conducting random assessments at about 25 stores in the coming weeks “to evaluate contaminants in products on store shelves.”

“Each sample will be tested for pesticides and total yeast and mold by a state- and ISO-certified marijuana testing facility. Results of their respective testing will be shared with each facility and will also be shared broadly within a write-up of results,” the announcement read.

As the winter holidays approach, retail companies routinely find themselves needing extra seasonal help for the extra business. But rather than working inside an Amazon warehouse, you could trim weed instead.

“They call it Crop-tober, and it primarily affects outdoor grows in southern Colorado and northern California, around mid-September through October,” explains Karson Humiston, founder of cannabis employment recruiter Vangst.

Travis Howard launched Shift, his cannabis company, back in 2010, but didn’t put weed on the shelves until this summer. The Boulder attorney originally established Shift as a consulting firm, acquiring cannabis business licenses while helping other potrepreneurs manage their own green dreams.

Now he wants to put his own mark on your lungs, with Shift Genuine Cannabis available in dispensaries throughout Colorado. We spoke with Howard to learn more about his journey through legal cannabis and why he chose to start a flower-focused company.

Ever hear the saying “Rappers want to be ball players, and ball players want to be rappers”? In the business of getting us fucked up, cannabis and alcohol companies appear to go through similar yearnings.

Dispensary shelves already feature beers, hard seltzers and wines infused with pot instead of alcohol, while liquor stores hope that CBD-containing, rebranded non-alcoholic beers will appeal to increasing numbers of canna-curious customers.

Now a cannabis concentrate company wants to zig where drink makers have been zagging, releasing a hash pen cartridge that is supposed to taste like an India Pale Ale — or as my Midwestern uncle likes to call them, “pine cone beers.”

Cannabis legalization has not only spurred a wide variety of new industries, but it’s reinvigorating some old business models. Noticing the growing interest around terpenes — plant compounds found in cannabis and hops (and fruits, flowers, coffee and pretty much anything else grown on Earth) — Niki Sawni decided to start a line of non-alcoholic beverages geared toward cannabis users.

Using terpenes to make non-alcoholic IPAs, sours and even wines, Sawni’s beverage company, Gruvi, has been able to breathe new life into sober drinks; Gruvi products are now on the shelves of 45 liquor stores and craft breweries around Colorado. We recently sat down with Sawni to learn more about how drinking terpenes without the booze can affect our experiences with cannabis.

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