Search Results: erickson (6)

Politically Incorrect Conservative

In a cynical move, a Senate proposal which had been touted as protecting the email privacy of Americans has been rewritten — and it now gives government spooks even more power to spy on citizens than then already have under the execrable PATRIOT Act.

Patrick Leahy, the Democratic chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee who himself wrote significant portions of the PATRIOT Act, has “dramatically reshaped” his legislation in response to “law enforcement concerns,” reports Declan McCullagh at CNET. (If the “law enforcement concerns” were that they were allowed to spy, unrestrained, on citizens not suspected of any crimes, then, good job, Senator Leahy — asshole.)

NorCal Blogs

LEAP Cites Public Safety Concerns Created by Illegal Marketplace
A former narcotics cop on Tuesday morning delivered a letter signed by 73 current and former police officers, judges, prosecutors and federal agents to Attorney General Eric Holder urging him not to interfere with the wishes of the voters of Colorado and Washington State to legalize and regulate marijuana.
“We seem to be at a turning point in how our society deals with marijuana,” said Neill Franklin, executive director of Law Enforcement Against Prohibition (LEAP), the group that authored the letter. “The war on marijuana has funded the expansion of drug cartels, it has destroyed community-police relations and it has fostered teenage use by creating an unregulated market where anyone has easy access.

420 Studios
U.S. Attorney Laura Duffy’s pharmacy crackdown? Dueling press releases Friday morning

It was apparently an entirely new tactic representing an interesting change of pace from her usual war on medical marijuana dispensaries. United States Attorney Laura E. Duffy on Tuesday announced — or seemed to announce — enforcement actions against pharmacies in Southern California. The stores were targeted, Duffy said in a press release, because of “distribution of drugs for illegal purposes.”
According to the press release, which says it is from “Assistant U.S. Attorney Frank Shiner” at (619) 302-5235, “immediate enforcement” will target pharmacies in the Coastal areas of La Jolla, Carmel Valley, and Pacific Beach; chosen for both the high rates of pharmaceutical drug abuse and high property values of targeted pharmacies. Affected pharmacies will have 45 days to shutdown in order to avoid harsher penalties.
“The Pharmaceutical shutdown initiative is aimed at curtailing drug abuse and its associated societal problems in the Southern District of California,” Duffy’s office seemed to announce Tuesday morning.
But another, conflicting release sent just an hour later from Press Secretary Steven T. Frederickson at (619) 306-2854, claims that “unknown individuals have forged documents claiming that this office has initiated a shut down pharmacies [sic]in the coastal areas of San Diego County.
“Many in the community have expressed outrage over the perceived imposition of our department in the rights of San Diego patients to receive their medication,” the second release reads, in what — if it’s real — must be one of the most richly ironic statements in history.

Photo: Montana Legislature
Sen. Rowlie Hutton (R-Helena): This moron believes that God wants him to take medical marijuana away from patients. “Sometimes the most compassionate answer you can give is no, you don’t need this,” Hutton, a pastor, said of medical marijuana.

​The Montana Senate voted 29-21 on Thursday to repeal Montana’s medical marijuana law after an emotional debate marked by angry finger-pointing by senators from both sides.

After debating for more than an hour, the Senate finally gave preliminary approval to House Bill 161, by Speaker Mike Milburn (R-Cascade), to repeal the state’s medical marijuana law on July 1, reports Charles S. Johnson at the Helena Independent Record. The Senate will take a final vote on the bill Friday.
Earlier on Thursday, the Senate voted 36-14 to send SB 423, which would repeal and overhaul the medical marijuana law, to the House floor after it had stalled in the Senate on Wednesday. Because it missed a key deadline, SB 423 will now require a two-thirds majority in the House to s suspend the bil..
Montana’s medical marijuana law was approved by an overwhelming 62 percent of state voters in 2004.
Milburn said he was asking the House GOP to suspend the rules and take up SB 423 as a second option to the outright repeal bill, which he prefers.
During the debate on HB 161, Sen. Rowlie Hutton (R-Havre) claimed that, as a pastor, he has been asked to participate in “interventions” for people “addicted to marijuana.” He called for making medical marijuana illegal again.

Photo: Walter Hinick/Montana Standard
Glenn Erickson, MedMar: “We wanted to provide a safe, secure atmosphere”

​One of Montana’s largest single-location retailers of cigarettes is now selling something else to smoke. But you need to be a registered patient to buy it.

Glenn Erickson at Gilligan’s Tobacco Shop has opened MarMed of Montana on the second floor of his store in Butte, reports Tim Trainor at The Montana Standard.
Before adding marijuana to his smokables, Erickson, 55, met with Butte-Silver Bow law enforcement and the county attorney’s office, making sure he was doing nothing illegal and was operating within the law.
“From a business standpoint, there are a lot of unknowns,” said Erickson, who has operated the tobacco shop for 12 years. “Let’s be honest; there is a lot that still needs to be cleared up.”

Artwork: Jimmy Wheeler
The late Jimmy Wheeler, a medical marijuana patient in Washington, created this artwork. Now a proposed patient protection bill will be named in his honor.

​As most medical marijuana patients in the state already know, the current medical marijuana law in Washington doesn’t protect patients from search, arrest or prosecution.

The recent Washington Supreme Court ruling in State v. Fry further highlighted how little protection — as in almost none! — the current law gives “legal” patients.
Medical marijuana activists Ken Martin and Steve Sarich of patient advocacy group CannaCare contacted every Senator and Representative in Washington at the beginning of the current 2010 legislative session, attempting to find a sponsor for their new bill that would finally offer legal patients protection from arrest and prosecution.
“We could not find a single sponsor for this bill,” Sarich told Toke of the Town. “Those I actually spoke with told me they were ‘too busy’ this session.”
“This made us curious about what, exactly, these legislators were so busy working on (besides new taxes on just about everything),” Sarich said. “What we found amazed us.”